News or feature reports on Red-tagging, other forms of hate speech (advance notice of bonuses, Media Monitor)

News or feature reports on Red-tagging, other forms of hate speech (advance notice of bonuses, Media Monitor)

      A review of news stories or feature reports on Red-tagging and other forms of hate speech or verbal attacks (whether as jokes, speeches, interpersonal communication) based on gender or gender identity, race, religion, ethnic origin, national origin, disability, physical appearance, etc.

     An example is the following news feature (a GOOD EXAMPLE) on Philippine Star:
From Philippine Star “For Lumad schools, even holding class is a struggle” by Jonathan de Santos (philstar.com) – July 11, 2018 – 11:33am at

https://www.philstar.com/headlines/2018/07/11/1831716/lumad-schools-even-holding-class-struggle

is a news report on Red-tagging by President Duterte against the Lumads. The news feature is a GOOD EXAMPLE and illustrates the following SPJ provisions:
“-Be vigilant and courageous about holding those with power accountable. Give voice to the voiceless.” (SPJ 2014)
“– Boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear.” (SPJ 2014)
Here are portions of the article (set here in itals) :
    President Rodrigo Duterte, a year ago, threatened to bomb Lumad schools—volunteer-run schools for indigenous peoples’ communities in remote parts of Mindanao—for, he said, indoctrinating children into socialism.
     “I will use the armed forces, the Philippine Air force. I’ll really have those bombed… because you are operating illegally and you are teaching the children to rebel against government,” he said in remarks that were later walked back after criticism from rights groups and from representatives of the communities themselves.
    xxx Often set up in what the Department of Education calls Geographically Isolated and Disadvantaged Areas that government schools may not be able to reach, the Lumad schools provide lessons in numeracy, literacy and skills like carpentry, sewing and agriculture.
      xxx Education, not assimilation
       But indigenous peoples’ education—and the Lumad schools—is not new, nor necessarily a form of rebellion. It requires, however, a shift in perspective that is, in a way, a revolution away from a one-size-fits-all curriculum.
      One way to look at IP education, Maria Lourie Victor with the Department of Education’s Indigenous Peoples Education Office said, is through the monggo and gumamela.
      For generations of Filipino students, they were the go-to learning aids for lessons on plants. Their use, though, takes for granted that these are available and familiar across the country’s more than 7,000 islands.
     Victor said in an interview with Philstar.com that although the old curriculum worked, it was prescriptive and not always culturally appropriate.

     Beyond the choice of teaching aids, she said, the old curriculum risked erasing an IP group’s own culture and history. xxx (From the Philippine Star)

Other bonus topics include:

A review of news stories or feature reports, opinion, etc. on the “Buwan ng Wika) (please render the discussion in Filipino)

    A review of news stories, feature reports, etc. on superstition and the occult (illustrating Article 13 of the KBP Broadcast Code

   Advertorials

   (the list of bonus topics will again be provided when the window for the media monitor is opened next week).

(image credits: as stated in the archives)

 

 

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