K-12: 2016-17 no one graduates high school; Gr. 11-12 require 50% additional classrooms, chairs, teachers; public schools not equipped, will result in massive forced dropouts

      The President dismissed the picketers at the PICC protesting the K-12 program by snickering that there were only 20 of them carrying five banners each; and so therefore deserve to be ignored.

       Perhaps the following numbers on the implementation of the K-12 program would appeal more to the President. Or perhaps the Supreme Court would deign to look at the numbers  and ask questions on the following:

      Next year, before his term ends, no one will graduate from high school or what is now called Grade 10. If students want a high school diploma, they will be legally forced to stay behind, if they can afford it, in their public high school or private high school,  if their school is offering Grades 11 to 12. If.  (at some point, some smart investigative reporter will find out exactly how many public high schools will actually offer Grades 11 to 12. Maybe the Supreme Court can ask the respondents).

    According to representatives of teachers’ organizations, many if not most public high schools are not equipped/ will not offer Grades 11 to 12. Students will be forced to transfer or to drop out. Those who cannot afford to continue, or who cannot afford to transfer to the schools that offer Grades 11 to 12 (mainly private schools) will be forced to drop out.   It is important to get the actual numbers because we’re talking about FORCED dropouts in tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands through no fault on the part of the students.

          Here is the additional math problem, Mr. President:

     Next year, there would have to be a 25% increase in classrooms, chairs, restrooms, teachers, textbooks, white boards/ blackboards. chalk/markers, canteen facilities, janitors, security guards, etc.. 1.1ontheway

    This does not yet include content or curriculum and the requirements to prepare for that shift.

     Why 25%  additional? This corresponds to the number of formerly fourth year high school and now Grade 10 students. They’re about one-fourth (in round numbers) of the high school population; they will not graduate, they’ll be forced to stay behind if their high school is offering the additional two years; if not, they have to transfer if they can afford it; if they cannot afford it, they will drop out. Can you imagine being forced to drop out through no fault of your own but due to the fact that your school is not equipped to provide the required Grades 11 to 12, or because you cannot afford to transfer to a school that offers Grades 11 to 12?

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        Do the math, Mr. President, and see how many will be forced to be “street urchins”:  Get 25% of the total number of classrooms, chairs, restrooms, teachers, textbooks, white boards/ blackboards. chalk/markers, canteen facilities, janitors, being used AT PRESENT, or servicing all high school students AT PRESENT. That is part of the logistical requirement or only half of the logistical requirement because it’s only for Grade 11 (and these numbers do not yet include content or logistics for teacher-preparedness for the new curriculum). Use time and motion studies and see if you can set up the additional infrastructure, buildings, drainage, lighting facilities, etc. in 12 months nationwide.  

    According to press releases of the Department of Education, there’s no longer a shortage in classrooms this schoolyear and there is now a 1:1 ratio between students and chairs. At some point, an independent researcher or investigative reporter will give us an overview if this is true: DZMM made a random sampling today: at the Corazon Aquino High School, the administrators put dividers in the middle of classrooms servicing 45 students to fit two classes in each classroom to service double the number, or 90 students. In other words, in that school, there was no shortage of classrooms because they will squeeze in 90 students in one classroom. O, di ba? No shortage.

    This needs to be examined nationwide — the shortage is probably worse in the rural areas.

     For Grade 12 in 2017, you need the same additional infrastructure — another 25% of the total classrooms, chairs, restrooms, teachers, textbooks, white boards/ blackboards. chalk/markers, canteen facilities, janitors, security guards.

     25% additional for the new Grade 11 and 25% additional for the new Grade 12: In other words, to be logistically prepared for K-12, or for the additional Grades 11 to 12, the high school system needs an INCREASE OF 50% of the classrooms, chairs, restrooms, teachers, textbooks, white boards/ blackboards. chalk/markers, canteen facilities, janitors, security guards, for the next 12-24 months.

     Failing which, tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands will be forced to drop out through no fault of their own.

 [These numbers do not yet include content, or the logistical requirement to equip teachers for the new curriculum: Specialization in the following tracks: Curriculum A: Academic; Curriculum B: Technical-Vocational-Livelihood; and Curriculum C: Sports and Arts.  Curriculum A:The Academic track  includes three strands: Business, Accountancy, Management (BAM); Humanities, Education, Social Sciences (HESS); and Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM). This is from the Official Gazette, which did not include the curriculum for the Technical-Vocational track and the Sports and Arts track].

      This week, the President scoffed at the 20 or so picketers protesting the K-12 program. In 2016, a few weeks before his term ends, the President rides into the sunset as he leaves a legacy of tens of thousands of high school dropouts — This po is the applicable multiplication table for the problem,  Mr. President.

2 thoughts on “K-12: 2016-17 no one graduates high school; Gr. 11-12 require 50% additional classrooms, chairs, teachers; public schools not equipped, will result in massive forced dropouts

  1. Ask ko lang po hindi ako naka enroll this year. Im a fresh high school graduate. Paano yun e k-12 na po ang curiculum so it means walang magtatapos nxt year which 2016, paano ako makakapasok eh walang mga estudyante that time also until 2017. Hoping for your response. 🙂

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  2. Maaari kang tumawag sa Department of Education o kaya ay sa Commission on Higher Education upang ipormalisa ang iyong tanong at makakuha ng opisyal na sagot o polisiya.
    Ang aking opinyon, na maaaring hindi sundin kaya mahalaga na kumuha ka ng opisyal na sagot, ang lahat ng estudyante na nakakuha ng high school diploma ngayong taon o nuong isang taon ay siyempre pwedeng mag-kolehiyo dahil naka-graduate sila ng high school kahit na ito ay sa loob ng lumang curriculum: graduate pa rin sila ng high school at qualified na mag-kolehiyo. Sa Ikalawang tanong na: “paano ako makakapasok eh walang mga estudyante that time also until 2017…”. Ang pagkakaalam ko ay kahit na halos walang papasok sa kolehiyo sa 2016 at 2017 dahil ang mga estudyante ay nasa Gr.11, tapos Gr.12, marahil ay may mangilan-ngilan pa ring kolehiyo na mananatiling bukas. Halimbawa, ang mga state universities, ang budget nila ay galing sa pamahalaan kaya mananatili silang bukas. Kaya, sana, kahimanawari ay: ang mga estudyante na may high school diploma ay makakahanap pa rin ng bukas na kolehiyo sa 2016 at 2017.
    Salamat sa iyong pagsulat!

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