50 years’ Commemoration,  Marcos Martial Law One-Man-Rule : Commemorative Activities by the Law on Mass Media Class, marichulambino September 20-21, 2022, pursuant to the U.P. President’s memo on #NeverForget #NeverAgain (posts of classmembers up to 4pm Sept. 21, 2022)

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50 years’ Commemoration, Marcos Martial Law One-Man-Rule : Commemorative Activities by the Law on Mass Media Class, marichulambino September 20-21, 2022, pursuant to the U.P. President’s memo on #NeverForget #NeverAgain (posts of class members up to 4pm Sept. 21, 2022)

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Submitted hours in advance by class member Malaya to be able to attend and participate in this afternoon’s activities in commemoration of the 50th year of remembering the brutal Marcos martial law dictatorship:

“Material: Maynila sa mga Kuko ng Liwanag (1975) directed by Lino Brocka

“Synopsis: Julio, a fisherman from the barrios, tried his luck in Metro Manila in finding his childhood love, Ligaya. He was then exposed to unfair labor practices, critiquing how even the least fortunate gets preyed on by those higher in the economic scale. There was greed and social injustice all over the film. Julio was also involuntarily forced to know his body’s monetary equal just to make ends meet, an exploitation which sadly happens to this day.

“Review: Taking this film out of context might make a first-time watcher believe that this is not at all related to the Marcoses. However, we tend to forget how our individual problems are actually systematic and political. Juxtaposing the frugal living conditions experienced by the main characters of the film against the Marcoses’ inane claim that they pushed the Philippines into a modern, more progressive country, you will be sure that this ruling family bleeds lies.

“Lives were claimed because of poverty and the society’s hierarchical structure which induces power-tripping. The reality of the working class was covered on screen, in the sense that the system enables the poor to be more drowned into poverty. One of Julio’s friends fell off the construction site, and his coworkers were contemplating as to which hospital he should be brought into, as they very well know that their healthcare would not be subsidized by the firm they are employed under. It is absurd how in situations when urgency is a matter of life and death, the poor are still forced to assess whether they have enough to pay for their bills.

“In commemoration of the 50th year of the declaration of Martial Law, more so the lives lost because of it, with another Marcos in power, we should pursue the horrid truths about the state of the Filipinos under Marcos Sr. Now more than ever, we push back against lies and disinformation. Here’s to never forgetting.” Submitted by Malaya

19 thoughts on “50 years’ Commemoration,  Marcos Martial Law One-Man-Rule : Commemorative Activities by the Law on Mass Media Class, marichulambino September 20-21, 2022, pursuant to the U.P. President’s memo on #NeverForget #NeverAgain (posts of classmembers up to 4pm Sept. 21, 2022)

  1. Material: Maynila sa mga Kuko ng Liwanag (1975) directed by Lino Brocka

    Synopsis: Julio, a fisherman from the barrios, tried his luck in Metro Manila in finding his childhood love, Ligaya. He was then exposed to unfair labor practices, critiquing how even the least fortunate gets preyed on by those higher in the economic scale. There was greed and social injustice all over the film. Julio was also involuntarily forced to know his body’s monetary equal just to make ends meet, an exploitation which sadly happens to this day.

    Review: Taking this film out of context might make a first-time watcher believe that this is not at all related to the Marcoses. However, we tend to forget how our individual problems are actually systematic and political. Juxtaposing the frugal living conditions experienced by the main characters of the film against the Marcoses’ inane claim that they pushed the Philippines into a modern, more progressive country, you will be sure that this ruling family bleeds lies.

    Lives were claimed because of poverty and the society’s hierarchical structure which induces power-tripping. The reality of the working class was covered on screen, in the sense that the system enables the poor to be more drowned into poverty. One of Julio’s friends fell off the construction site, and his coworkers were contemplating as to which hospital he should be brought into, as they very well know that their healthcare would not be subsidized by the firm they are employed under. It is absurd how in situations when urgency is a matter of life and death, the poor are still forced to assess whether they have enough to pay for their bills.

    In commemoration of the 50th year of the declaration of Martial Law, more so the lives lost because of it, with another Marcos in power, we should pursue the horrid truths about the state of the Filipinos under Marcos Sr. Now more than ever, we push back against lies and disinformation. Here’s to never forgetting.

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  2. Synopsis:
    Ang midya ang isa sa mga naapektuhan noong kapanahunan ng Martial Law. Sa dokumentaryong “Portraits of Mosquito Press”, isiniwalat ang mga kwento ng karahasan, pang-aaresto, pananalakay ng mga militar, at lalo na ang kawalan ng kalayaan sa pamamahayag noong panahon ng Batas Militar. Ipinakita ni JL Burgos sa dokumentaryong ito ang mga paghihirap na naranasan ng mga mamamahayag makamit lamang ang kalayaang minimithi o ang Press Freedom sa panahon ng pagiging diktador ni Marcos.

    Review:
    Maraming nilabag na karapatang pantao ang Martial Law. Ika nga ni Rene Saguisag, “I would like to blame and credit Marcos for making human rights lawyering possible.” Marami na ang mga batas na ipinasa na makakapagbigay ng proteksyon sa ating mga Pilpino katulad na lamang ng 1987 Constitution Article III Section 4 na magtatanggol sa karapatan nating malayang pagpapahayag pasalita man ito, pasulat, o kung ano pang mga paraan ng pagpapahayag. Ang dokumentaryong Portraits of Mosquito Press ay nagpapabatid ng mensahe sa mga kabataan na pahalagahan ang kalayaang kanilang tinatamasa sa kasalukuyang panahon at tuklasin ang katotohanang naganap noong panahon ng Martial Law. Tinuran ni Edith Burgos, asawa ng namayapang press freedom hero na si Jose Burgos Jr., na kung gagamitin lamang ng mga kabataan ang kanilang talento sa paggamit ng social media, upang hanapin ang totoong naganap noong panahon ng Martial Law, mamumulat sila sa katotohanan at alamin din ang mga batas na maaaring magtagol sa atin bilang mga alagad ng midya. Ipinapaalala rin ng dokumentaryona ang mga paglabag sa malayang pagpapahayag, malayang pananalita, at sa karapatang pantao ay hindi lamang nagaganap sa isang kapanahunan kung hindi maging sa kasalukuyan kaya sa tulong ng asignaturang ito ay malalaman natin ang mga batas na may kinalaman sa midya upang tayo ay hindi lamang malaya, kundi ay maging responsable din na mga alagad ng midya.

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  3. Summary:
    The same year that Ferdinand Marcos Sr. was ousted from his position as the President of the Philippines, “Coup d’Etat: The Philippines Revolt” was released under the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Directed by Geoff Satchell, this documentary chronicles the events that resulted in the downfall of the Marcos dictatorship over the span of four days. The key informants for this documentary include the then-Defense Minister Juan Ponce Enrile, Colonel Gringo Honasan, and Father James Reuter. They explained what exactly happened from February 22 to 25 of the year 1986.

    Review:
    This documentary is relevant to our Media Law class as it showed how determined we Filipinos were to exercise our right to freedom of expression. The EDSA People Power Revolution is something that we should never take for granted. It is thanks to every single Filipino who marched that day that we are now able to speak for ourselves. Having said this, one of the things that really stood out to me from this documentary was how indispensable Father James Reuter was to the movement. He was able to establish a network of radio stations that not only served as a form of communication between the different sectors of society, but also provided uncensored information about the revolution. —For the first time in a long time, Filipinos had access to a stream of news that was independent from the Marcos administration, and therefore free from propaganda.

    Another aspect in which this documentary is relevant to our class is that it highlights the value of our right to a free press. One of the first things that Marcos Sr. did upon the declaration of Martial Law was monopolize the media landscape. Through controlling the information that the public had access to, he effectively controlled the people. The beginning of Marcos Sr.’s reign of terror was secured through the eradication of a free press. This demonstrates how the media is an undeniably powerful tool. —Hence, as shown in the documentary, it only makes sense that the reestablishment of mass media was one of the things that facilitated Marcos Sr. ‘s undoing.

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  4. Material: Alaala: A Martial Law Special

    Synopsis:
    Written by Boni Ilagan, Alaala follows his story as a student activist during the time of martial law. It mainly depicts his experiences fighting against the unjust government in rallies and distributing manifestos with Kabataang Makabayan, as well as the struggles he experienced when he was eventually captured and tortured. Interviews with historians and people with first-hand experiences of martial law are also depicted, discussing the brutal events that occurred then and the effects it had (and continues to have) on the country and the people.

    Review:
    I found the docudrama very eye-opening because it exposed me to the truth of what martial law was like in the eyes of an activist, someone who was genuinely aware of the government’s unjust practices and actively fighting against them. It was shocking to see how ruthlessly people were being treated, with student activists being spied on while in school, kidnapped, and tortured for simply speaking the truth to the people and going against the unjust government. It’s definitely relevant to Law on Mass Media since it depicts the effects of what happened when laws protecting the people and media were suspended. Activists and innocent people were harmed and tortured, and many news and information sources were silenced and shut down for simply speaking the truth, all with one signature suspending laws that the government should always uphold. In a way, it highlights the importance of our leaders not abusing their power and continuing to defend and protect these laws so that the past may not repeat itself and that the people, the rights they deserve, and the media are protected. All in all, films like these are vital as they educate people regarding the truth about martial law, the experiences of those wronged, and the selfish acts done by those in the government then, helping us remember the history and the people affected, that some are sadly trying to forget and erase.

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  5. 𝗟𝗶𝘄𝗮𝘆: 𝗞𝗮𝘄𝗮𝗹𝗮𝗻 𝗻𝗴 𝗣𝗮𝗴-𝗮𝘀𝗮, 𝗞𝗮𝘄𝗮𝗹𝗮𝗻 𝗻𝗴 𝗛𝘂𝘀𝘁𝗶𝘀𝘆𝗮
    𝘢𝘳𝘤𝘪𝘯𝘦𝘢𝘯𝘷𝘪𝘭𝘭𝘦

    “Minsan, ang batas ay walang hustisya.”

    Ang aking napiling gawan ng rebyu ay ang pelikulang Liway ni Kip Oebanda na nai-release noong 2018. Ang pelikulang ito ay tumatalakay sa totoong kwento ng paglaki ng batang bida na si Dakip sa kampo ng mga bilanggo kasama ang kanyang ina na si Cecilia Flores-Oebanda o mas kilala bilang si Commander Liway. Masasalamin sa kwento ang napakaraming suliranin na naranasan ng mga bilanggong rebelde sa panahon ng Batas Militar, hanggang sa pagtatapos nito; kung paanong ang kapalit ng paglaban para sa karapatan ay kawalan ng kalayaan at kawalan ng kasiguraduhan sa seguridad dahil kung anong ibabang utos sa mga militar, labag man sa batas o hindi, ay isinasagawa sa ayaw at sa gusto ng mga mamamayan; kung saan ang pagtaliwas sa pamahalaan at may kapangyarihan ay isang malaking kasalanan. 
    
    Tumatak sa akin ang parte ng pelikula kung saan tinalakay ang Negros Nine, ang siyam na nakulong sa maling paratang. Dito masasalamin kung gaano kadali gamitin ang batas para sa maling paraan, at kadalasan, inaabuso ang kapangyarihan upang apihin ang nasa laylayan. Dagdag pa rito, tinalakay din sa pelikula ang buhay ng mga tumataliwas sa pamahalaan, gaya ng mga aktibista at rebelde, kung saan napakababa ng tingin sa kanila at tinutugis sila na animo’y mga baboy ramo sa kagubatan na kapag nahuli ay ibabalandra bilang simbolo ng karangalan at kataasan ng militar. Isa sa pinaka-reyalistikong eksena sa pelikula ay ang pamumundok ng isang karakter sa pelikula na isang estudyanteng aktibista, kung saan sinabi niya kina Commander Liway at Commander Toto na, “Marami sa mga kaklase ko ang nasa watchlist ng gobyerno. Ang iba ay nawawala.” Dito makikitang imbis na protektahan ng gobyerno at batas ang mga mamamayan ay ito pa mismo ang rason bakit nangangamba sa seguridad ang mga ito. Masasalamin din ito hanggang sa kasalukuyan kung saan napakaraming atake at pangre-redtag sa mga alagad ng midya at mga aktibistang may kanya-kanyang pinaglalaban para sa bayan. Isang malaking manipestasyon na kayang-kayang manipulahin ng batas hindi para sa hustisya kundi para sa pansariling interes ng mga makapangyarihan; at kapag ikaw ang nasa ilalim ay wala kang karapatan lumaban, kahit para na lang sa sarili mong karapatan.
    

    Tama ngang minsan, o kadalasan, ang batas ay walang hustisya.

    At mukhang matagal-tagal pa ang bukang-liwayway ng pag-asa sa ating bayan.

    ###

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  6. Liway: Kawalan ng Pag-asa, Kawalan ng Hustisya
    arcineanville

    “Minsan, ang batas ay walang hustisya.”

    Synopsis:
    Ang aking napiling gawan ng rebyu ay ang pelikulang Liway ni Kip Oebanda na nai-release noong 2018. Ang pelikulang ito ay tumatalakay sa totoong kwento ng paglaki ng batang bida na si Dakip sa kampo ng mga bilanggo kasama ang kanyang ina na si Cecilia Flores-Oebanda o mas kilala bilang si Commander Liway. Masasalamin sa kwento ang napakaraming suliranin na naranasan ng mga bilanggong rebelde sa panahon ng Batas Militar, hanggang sa pagtatapos nito; kung paanong ang kapalit ng paglaban para sa karapatan ay kawalan ng kalayaan at kawalan ng kasiguraduhan sa seguridad dahil kung anong ibabang utos sa mga militar, labag man sa batas o hindi, ay isinasagawa sa ayaw at sa gusto ng mga mamamayan; kung saan ang pagtaliwas sa pamahalaan at may kapangyarihan ay isang malaking kasalanan.

    Review:
    Tumatak sa akin ang parte ng pelikula kung saan tinalakay ang Negros Nine, ang siyam na nakulong sa maling paratang. Dito masasalamin kung gaano kadali gamitin ang batas para sa maling paraan, at kadalasan, inaabuso ang kapangyarihan upang apihin ang nasa laylayan. Dagdag pa rito, tinalakay din sa pelikula ang buhay ng mga tumataliwas sa pamahalaan, gaya ng mga aktibista at rebelde, kung saan napakababa ng tingin sa kanila at tinutugis sila na animo’y mga baboy ramo sa kagubatan na kapag nahuli ay ibabalandra bilang simbolo ng karangalan at kataasan ng militar. Isa sa pinaka-reyalistikong eksena sa pelikula ay ang pamumundok ng isang karakter sa pelikula na isang estudyanteng aktibista, kung saan sinabi niya kina Commander Liway at Commander Toto na, “Marami sa mga kaklase ko ang nasa watchlist ng gobyerno. Ang iba ay nawawala.” Dito makikitang imbis na protektahan ng gobyerno at batas ang mga mamamayan ay ito pa mismo ang rason bakit nangangamba sa seguridad ang mga ito. Masasalamin din ito hanggang sa kasalukuyan kung saan napakaraming atake at pangre-redtag sa mga alagad ng midya at mga aktibistang may kanya-kanyang pinaglalaban para sa bayan. Isang malaking manipestasyon na kayang-kayang manipulahin ng batas hindi para sa hustisya kundi para sa pansariling interes ng mga makapangyarihan; at kapag ikaw ang nasa ilalim ay wala kang karapatan lumaban, kahit para na lang sa sarili mong karapatan.

    Tama ngang minsan, o kadalasan, ang batas ay walang hustisya.

    At mukhang matagal-tagal pa ang bukang-liwayway ng pag-asa sa ating bayan.

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  7. Tapang ng Pagpagaspas: Sa lansangan man o likod ng rehas
    Dagitab

    Sa akda ni Judy Taguiwalo na “Tibak Rising: Ang Babaeng Makibaka sa Likod ng Rehas”, isinalaysay niya ang paglahok sa mga militanteng organisasyon at pagiging aktibo sa lansangan. Nang ipatupad ang Batas Militar, mahigpit na ipinagbawal ang hayag na protesta na nagbunga sa pagkakakulong niya nang dalawang beses. Nakaranas ng matinding pisikal at mental tortyur si Judy ngunit siya’y nakatakas at bumalik sa pakikibaka. Sa ikalawang beses niyang pagkahuli, siya’y apat na buwan nang nagdadalang-tao at kalauna’y nanganak sa Camp Crame. Patunay ang kuwento ni Judy na sa lansangan man o sa likod ng rehas – buhay ang kanyang tapang na sagupain ang diktadura at tumindig bilang isang babae, nanay, at mamamayang Pilipino.

    Ang mga sulatin tulad ng anekdota ni Judy ay buhay na patotoo sa mga atrosidad at karapatang pantaong niyurakan ng Batas Militar. Malinaw sa panahon ng diktadura ang kawalan ng pagkilala sa batas, at isa ito sa mga dahilan kung bakit ang mga kagaya ni Judy ay basta na lamang dinampot, tinortyur, at ikinulong. Samakatuwid, ang mga inilathalang kuwento ay mabigat na paalala kung gaano kahalaga na kinikilala at mayroong batas na umiiral. Konektado ito sa kursong Comm 120: Law on Mass Media; tiyak na mapaiigting ang kagustuhan ng mga mag-aaral na lumaban para sa pantay na karapatan at makataong batas sapagkat naipupunla sa kanila ang kahalagahan nito. Halimbawa, ang karapatan sa paghahayag o freedom of expression ng mga tao, partikular ng mga aktibista, ay tahasang tinapakan ng malupit na diktadura. Matatalakay ang paksang ito sa Comm 120 na magpapamulat sa mga mag-aaral kung gaano ito kahalaga, paano poprotektahan, at hanggang saan ang sakop.

    Karagdagan pa, mayroong tauhang nabanggit sa anekdota: si Tish, ang unang babaeng editor-in-chief ng Aggie Green and Gold, ang opisyal na dyaryo ng mga mag-aaral sa UPLB. Huling nakita si Tish noong 1975 sa may PHG Taft; mula noon ay hindi na siya muling nakita at walang sinuman ang nakaaalam ng totoong nangyari sa kanya. Isa si Tish sa libo-libong estudyante-peryodista na binusalan ang bibig at tinanggalan ng tinta ang pluma. Maiuugnay ito sa pokus ng Comm 120: mga batas sa pangmadlang midya, kasama ang mga karapatang dapat tinatamasa ng mga alagad nito. Sa kursong ito maisisiwalat sa mga mag-aaral, higit lalo sa mga nagbabalak na tahakin ang landas ng midya, kung gaano kalala ang pagtapak sa karapatan ng mga mamamahayag. Subalit kasabay ng mapait na katotohanan ay ang mga nakalakip na aral sa kurso na magpapasiklab ng kagustuhang magsulat, mag-ulat, at magmulat. Hawak natin ang tanglaw ng katotohanang dapat matamasa ng mamamayang Pilipino – at hindi ito makakamit kung hindi natin paiigtingin ang pagprotekta sa ating mga karapatan bilang alagad ng midya.

    Sa ika-50 taong anibersaryo ng pagdeklara ng Batas Militar, nawa’y manatiling buháy ang alaala ng mga taong ilegal na dinampot, tinortyur, pinaslang, at bigla na lamang naglaho. Sa pagbabalik ng panibagong Marcos sa Malacañang, mas lalo nating pasiklabin ang pag-alala at pakikibaka.

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  8. Synopsis: Panahon ng Batas Militar, kasagsagan ng istriktong pagpapatupad ng disiplina at curfew. Tutungo si Jenny at Lola Priming sa Camp Crame, upang bisitahin ang inang si Aling Chit, isang political prisoner. Sa daan, nakita niya ang larawan nina Marcos, gayundin ang mga Metrocom na mahigpit na nagbabantay. Sa tuwing siya’y bibisita sa kanyang ina, inaabutan siya nito ng bulaklak na papel na kanyang iniipon hanggang sa nagmistulang hardin na ang kanyang silid dahil walong taon din ang lumipas bago sumiklab ang EDSA Revolution at nakalaya ang kanyang ina.

    Review: Sa aklat pambata na ito ipinababatid sa kabataan ang katotohanan ukol sa mga kaganapan sa ilalim ng Batas Militar ng noo’y administrasyong Marcos, lalo pa’t sila ang bubuo sa bayan sa hinaharap. Bukod dito, idinidiin din ang karapatan ng bawat mamamayan sa malayang pagpapahayag, isa sa mga paksang tatalakayin sa kursong ito. Ito ay malinaw na nalabag nang ikulong si Aling Chit, at iba pang political prisoners, dahil sa paglalahad nila ng saloobin sa pamahalaan.

    Kaugnay nito, hindi lingid sa kaalaman ng lahat ang pagkontrol ng gobyerno sa mga pahayagan at istasyon noon kung saan nagkaroon ng pagsasala ng mga impormasyong inilalabas sa publiko. Dito naisaalang-alang ang karapatan ng mga mamamahayag sa malayang pamamahayag at karapatan ng mga mamamayan sa pagtatamasa ng mga impormasyong dapat batid nila.

    Sa kabuuan, isinasalaysay ng Isang Harding Papel kung paano naisantabi ang demokrasya sa ilalim ng Batas Militar sa pamamagitan ng paglabag ng pamahalaan sa mga karapatang pantao at mga karapatang may kinalaman sa malayang pagpapahayag na bahagi ng Saligang Batas at siyang pangunahing batayan ng isang demokratikong nasyon. Isa pa, sa pagbanggit nito ng makasaysayang EDSA People Power Revolution kakabit ng paglaya ni Aling Chit, ipinahihiwatig na taglay ng sambayanan ang kapangyarihang magpasya para sa bayan, kapangyarihang kumawala at lumaya sa anumang mukha ng paniniil.

    Material: Isang Harding Papel isinulat ni Augie Rivera at iginuhit ni Rommel Joson

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  9. clumsygirl

    Material: The Conjugal Dictatorship of Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos (Chapter 3 pages 48 – 52)

    Synopsis:
    Si Primitivo Mijares ay ang mamamahayag na kanang kamay ni Ferdinand Edralin Marcos. Tuwiran niyang nakita ang mga aksyong ginawa ni Marcos at ng kanyang mga tauhan sa napakahalagang araw ng Setyembre 22, 1972. Sa simula ng ikatlong kabanata ay kanyang isiniwalat ang mga palitan ng usap at aksyon nina Marcos, Enrile at ng iba pa nilang kasabwat. Dinetalye niya rin kung paano nabagabag ang ilang mamamahayag sa pagiging masyadong tahimik ng paligid na umabot sa puntong ito ay kahina-hinala na.

    Review:
    Nakita sa unang bahagi ng ikatlong kabanata kung gaano kalaki ang naging papel ng mga mamamahayag pagkalat ng impormasyon o maling impormasyon. May mga dyaryo tulad ng Daily Express na nakatulong upang maipakalat ang propaganda ng diktaduryang Marcos. Ang karamihan naman ng tutol kay Marcos ay ipinasara o kaya naman ay naging patago ang produksyon.

    Maraming batas tungkol sa pamamahayag noon at nakakalungkot na mayroong mga pagkakatulad sa nangyayari ngayon. Isa na rito ay ang pagsasara ng ABS-CBN na isa rin sa mga napasara noong panahon ng diktadurya. Madaling sabihin na ipinasara ang nasabing istasyon dahil sa kabiguan na mag-renew ng prangkisa ngunit mahalagang tignan kung naaayon nga ba sa batas mga ginawang aksyon tungkol dito. Ito ay isa sa mga dahilan kaya dapat ay maging maalam sa mga batas tungkol sa midya.

    Ang mga kaganapan sa kasaysayan ay mahalaga dahil nagsilbi itong aral at gabay sa mga periyodista ngayon. Dahil nakita na noon ang mga paglabag sa karapatan ng malayang pamamahayag ay mas nakikita natin kung bakit mahalagang ipaglaban at pangalagaan ang karapatang ito sa kasalukuyan. Ito ang dahilan kaya dapat ay may malalim na kaalaman at pag-unawa sa mga batas tungkol sa midya at ang mga detalyeng nakapaloob dito. Responsibilidad ng mga mamamahayag ngayon na malaman ang mga bawal at pwedeng gawin ayon sa batas na mayroon ang ating bansa upang maging mga maaasahan at mapagkakatiwalaang mamamahayag sa kasalukuyan.

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  10. Lunti

    Material: ML (2018 film)

    Synopsis: ML is a millennial approach to a psychological horror movie by Benedict Mique Jr. from 2018 that talks about the encounter of college students who are tasked to interview someone who lived during the imposition of martial law, and retired soldier with dementia “Colonel ” who mistakenly thought that they were part of communist groups. However, these students acquired answers for their assignment in an unanticipated way of experiencing first-hand the horrible tortures under the former soldier’s iron-fist the way he did it during the ‘70s.

    Bloody. Nerve-wracking. Harrowing.

    Depicting the abuses occurred under Marcos Sr. and the Duterte regime, ML mirrors the existence of martial law’s horrors today that its tortures are still living until today.

    Review: Watching the film for the second time is still chilling. It pictured how life was back then when the Philippines was striving under a dictator who directly and indirectly violated human rights for his own and family’s will. Colonel’s character represents both being an abuser of power and a victim of the system, alongside misinformation. Moreover, the character of the college students characterize today’s people who’ve gotten wrong perceptions about martial law. However, this film does not highlight the experiences of the victims but today’s dilemma that the events and the abuses during those times are getting forgiven, forgotten, and accepted inch by inch. ML is not about the drugwar-induced extrajudicial killings, but to those who allow it to happen.

    This film is for those who romanticize that the martial law era is the country’s golden time; those who glorify fascists and tyrants; those who believes that the killings are reasonable, and those who consciously allowed the rule of another Marcos whose personal aim is to falsify facts not favoring them and distorting history. All of that is in one aim: to exploit the Philippines and its people again. This is the power of the media today; it resuscitates what has been forgotten and reminds the masses about it. ML is a reminder that the horrors that happened during this darkest time in Philippine history still exist until today—and that we should never forgive and forget.

    As long as the abusers are still considered heroes, justice is being delayed. As long as justice for the victims is being delayed, justice is still being denied. “Hindi pa tapos ang Martial Law. Hindi talaga ito matatapos.” ―Colonel (ML, 2018).

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  11. SYNOPSIS: The songs “Saranggola ni Pepe” by Celeste Legaspi and “Oy Utol, Buto’t Balat Ka Naý Natutulog Ka Pa” by Heber Bartolome are protest songs created during the Marcos Administration that highlights two sides to the regime. Legaspi’s Saranggola ni Pepe focused on the Filipino dream of heroism and nationalism stripped away by the Spaniards, the Americans, and then the Marcos Administration. On the other hand, Bartolome also focused on both the helplessness, complacency, and silence that the Filipinos felt during the Martial Law.

    REVIEW:
    Bartolome’s lines of “Kay mahirap nang mangusap kung bibig moý may tapal” paint a clear image of the media’s position during Martial law.

    In a time when speech and media were heavily facilitated by the government, protest music became an underhanded form of discreet rebellion. Outright publishing of activist works against the government was blasphemy and could be grounds for execution, which is why Legaspi and Bartolome’s use of metaphors was crucial to delivering the messages of these songs. Even Legaspi’s jovial melody in Saranggola ni Pepe is haunting, masking the dire situation of the
    Filipinos across history with a light-hearted tune.

    These songs reflected the cruel effect of media censorship during the time; despite the people knowing the injustices against them, they had no outlet to present their concerns and opposition. The threats of physical violence only furthered this fear, forcing the masses to become complacent.

    Therefore, I believe that Media laws are crucial in protecting the voice of the people. The Media has played a societal role as a counter public; a means for the people to criticize and address issues regarding social structures without the fear of abuse from the aggressors. As the law states, all men are created equal. Media laws, especially the Right to the Freedom of Speech, serve to protect this innate human reality that we are independent, feeling, and critical thinkers. However, the Martial law taking that away almost reduced the Filipinos to nothing more than frightened sheep. The Marcos’ control of the media is a clear factor in their twenty-one years of success.

    Like

  12. Manilay by Night (1980)
    Directed by Ishmael Bernal

    SYNOPSIS:

    Manila by Night is a multi-narrative story depicting the miserable lives of the people who live among the shadows of the eskinitas of Manila. Set in the time of Martial Law, it weaves the story of prostitutes, a teenage drug addict, a gay man, a bisexual taxi driver, a blind masseuse, and a lesbian drug pusher. It is both a celebration of Manila’s nightlife and an exposition of the capital’s urban decay.

    REVIEW:

    Manila by Night as a Martial Law masterpiece is a nod to film’s political and subversive powers. While its storytelling might be more subtle about the conditions of Martial Law, its criticisms of the Marcos regime were masked behind the poetic, tragic stories of his characters who represent the condition of the poor and marginalized Filipinos under the Martial Law era.

    Bernal’s piece throws shade at the Marcoses’ deceptive ploy to mask their atrocities behind a false golden age of Manila. However, the conditions of the people from the roots and poorest sectors of society show otherwise.

    The film was controversial to the point where First lady Imelda Marcos banned it from export and ordered it to be renamed City After Dark as she believes it paints the country and Marcos as ruler in a bad light.

    A particular moment in the film that struck me was the ending. In the closing moments of the film, as the sun rises, the camera captures a shot of a looming wall over the character. It is as if Bernal is hinting at how Manila was a cage at the time of Marcos. The sun may have risen but no one is free from the night.

    At these times, especially now, this may yet be true again. But I sincerely pray we remain steadfast to the truth and cling to the hope of driving away the night and seeing the sun again.

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  13. “Signos” is a 1983 short film directed by Mike de Leon. The short film, spanning 38 minutes in length, begins with a montage of daily life in the Philippines – reflecting about one’s own fortune in contrast to the victims of the martial law. This is followed by interviews of various people, some being random members of the rallies, others being more notable personalities; former senator Jose Diokno, journalist Joe Burgos, director Lino Brocka, and so on.. The interviews, although from different people, all speak the same point: that they are against the rule of Ferdinand Marcos Sr.

    Joe Burgos, in his interview, stated that “in the presentent dictatorial regime of Mr. Marcos, press freedom can never be compatible,” and that press freedom will only come along if people assert their rights and if there is a democratic form of government. In his case, over a hundred fully armed officers came into their office, arresting the journalists and locking up the printing press.

    Lino Brocka mentioned that Imelda Marcos wished to show only what was good and beautiful – but this would mean to hide the truth and would only result in creating a false image. Perhaps this has carried over to this day and age – as the negative truths are often glossed over and instead lighter, trivial news fills the media.

    Censorship, as discussed in the short film, is incredibly relevant to the state of media and media law in the present day. A member at a rally full of filmmakers said “We are trying to create art that is honest, but we cannot create art that reflects truth if you hinder us like this”. This can also be felt as festivals and screenings that are showcasing films related to the Martial Law have been stopped by the police, stating violations of “other reasons”.

    -Goldfish Brain

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  14. Synopsis: The film I chose is Marcos: A Malignant Spirit, released in 1986 and narrated by broadcast journalist Angelo Castro Jr. Directed by Rolly Reyes, the documentary exposes the nitty-gritty details of the ill-gotten Marcos wealth, depicting both how the family’s kleptocracy came to be and how it drained the Philippines of any semblance of economic stability. Moreover, it sharply points out contradictions between what Marcos promised and what he actually did with his regime — a regime described as one “dedicated to plundering the wealth of the nation.”

    Review: While watching the film, I realized I already knew a good chunk of the information presented from college lectures, readings, and other films I’ve already seen about Martial Law. On a stylistic level, I was interested by how the film juxtaposes footage of the Marcos’ extravagance with scenes of Filipino suffering. Perhaps what I was most shocked by were the illicitly-recorded conversations between Marcos and his supposed allies, and where the narrator detailed a list of turncoats who brought forth explicitly damning evidence against the family. With one of the film’s core focuses being how Marcos used his legal skills to escape implication for extreme graft, the main connection I made with our Comm 120 class is how no one should be above the constitution. Not even the most elite political families of the country should be exempted from punishment, as criminals must be rightfully punished in accordance with the law. Because the Marcoses have continually been treated as if they are above the constitution and its respective sentences — despite extreme cases of theft, plunder, and human rights violations — they were finally able to wedge themselves back into power. Thus, the nation is experiencing threats to mass media, freedom of speech and the press, and basic human rights. The worst part is that thanks to the Marcoses’ massive disinformation machine, they are able to bend the country’s collective memory towards their favor and encourage people to antagonize anyone in the opposition. There can be no accountability without punishment, compensation, and appropriate civil procedure. However, those in power allow the Marcoses to cheat the legal system time and time again.

    Like

  15. “Barber’s Tales” (2013) by Jun Lana

    Synopsis:

    Set during Martial Law at the height of dissent, Jun Lana’s “Barber’s Tales” shares the story of Marilou —starred by Eugene Domingo — as she takes over her deceased husband’s barbershop in a small rural town. The film foregrounds female characters in a time when Marcos’s macho-feudal dictatorship pushed women to the background and margins, boxed in their roles as child-bearers, housewives, and sexual objects; all while depicting their slow enlightenment and eventual disillusionment from the government.

    Review:

    The film’s progression can be pointed out in the two shots that I consider my favorites: one found at the beginning— where Marilou is merely background to men, her husband, and the priest — and at the end, where she is at the foreground of the frame in the underground movement.

    As another Marcos has taken ahold of the highest position in the country, the film serves as a militant reminder of the role of women in society, in holding the government accountable, and upholding the democracy and justice. Tackling intersectional feminism, the struggle of the masses can be seen further amplified in the cases of the women of the community, as they experience not just oppression from the state forces, but also from the patriarchal society that belittles them. These instances are clearly manifested even in Marilou’s friends, Tessie —who is judged for being an old maiden—and Susan, whose husband treats her as a person for sex and repeatedly getting her pregnant. It also showed how prostitution is systemically maintained by husbands who cheat on their wives, paying sex workers who are forced to sell their bodies. Even so, Eugene Domingo’s role represents the capabilities of women in solidarity in their struggle to liberation.

    The film reminds the audience that women can take up space in the community, equal to men, and a space in the struggle for emancipation, out of the margins and the background.

    Like

  16. L122599P

    Aljazeera’s September 23, 2011 film titled “Imelda and Me” is about Veronica Pedrosa’s personal encounter with Mrs. Imelda Marcos. Veronica’s family was exiled during the 20-year dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos Sr. after her mother authored a controversial book narrating Imelda’s impoverished childhood. It was this experience that led her to report the ramifications of the Martial Law regime in the present-day Philippines, its relation to the insurgencies in Mindanao, and the forgetting of the Filipinos.
    This report, while written 11 years ago, remains relevant to the discussion of the Martial Law regime because it emphasizes the consequence of the Marcos family’s 10 Billion ill-gotten wealth and their abuse of governmental power. As someone born and raised in Mindanao, I grew up watching the news about Muslim insurgencies, the Abu Sayyaf, and the Ampatuan Massacre. I also frequently hear radio broadcasting about Military combats against insurgents, the disappearing or murders of people, and the huge economic divide between the Northern and Southern Philippines. The media has successfully desensitized me and other Mindanaons to corrupt strongmen leaders that impose fear and public humiliation when not followed. Veronica’s film demonstrated the media’s obligation to correct this by delivering news that emphasizes the rule of law and people’s democratic rights. She also illustrated the need to relate events that came after the Martial Law, to account for those who are responsible for the long history of neglect and discrimination that forced vulnerable communities into armed rebellion, into a tribunal. More importantly, the media has the power to innoculate Filipinos to aspire to the ideal leaders we need as a democratic nation. It is salient not only to commemorate the Marcos regime but also to realize that a man’s lack of moral stamina, patience, and tolerance, imprisoned a nation to a never-ending chain of poverty.
    

    Like

  17. Aljazeera’s September 23, 2011 film titled “Imelda and Me” is about Veronica Pedrosa’s personal encounter with Mrs. Imelda Marcos. Veronica’s family was exiled during the 20-year dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos Sr. after her mother authored a controversial book narrating Imelda’s impoverished childhood. It was this experience that led her to report the ramifications of the Martial Law regime in the present-day Philippines, its relation to the insurgencies in Mindanao, and the forgetting of the Filipinos.
    This report, while written 11 years ago, remains relevant to the discussion of the Martial Law regime because it emphasizes the consequence of the Marcos family’s 10 Billion ill-gotten wealth and their abuse of governmental power. As someone born and raised in Mindanao, I grew up watching the news about Muslim insurgencies, the Abu Sayyaf, and the Ampatuan Massacre. I also frequently hear radio broadcasting about Military combats against insurgents, the disappearing or murders of people, and the huge economic divide between the Northern and Southern Philippines. The media has successfully desensitized me and other Mindanaons to corrupt strongmen leaders that impose fear and public humiliation when not followed. Veronica’s film demonstrated the media’s obligation to correct this by delivering news that emphasizes the rule of law and people’s democratic rights. She also illustrated the need to relate events that came after the Martial Law, to account for those who are responsible for the long history of neglect and discrimination that forced vulnerable communities into armed rebellion, into a tribunal. More importantly, the media has the power to innoculate Filipinos to aspire to the ideal leaders we need as a democratic nation. It is salient not only to commemorate the Marcos regime but also to realize that a man’s lack of moral stamina, patience, and tolerance, imprisoned a nation to a never-ending chain of poverty.

    Like

  18. L122599

    Aljazeera’s September 23, 2011 film titled “Imelda and Me” is about Veronica Pedrosa’s personal encounter with Mrs. Imelda Marcos. Veronica’s family was exiled during the 20-year dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos Sr. after her mother authored a controversial book narrating Imelda’s impoverished childhood. It was this experience that led her to report the ramifications of the Martial Law regime in the present-day Philippines, its relation to the insurgencies in Mindanao, and the forgetting of the Filipinos.

    This report, while written 11 years ago, remains relevant to the discussion of the Martial Law regime because it emphasizes the consequence of the Marcos family’s 10 Billion ill-gotten wealth and their abuse of governmental power. As someone born and raised in Mindanao, I grew up watching the news about Muslim insurgencies, the Abu Sayyaf, and the Ampatuan Massacre. I also frequently hear radio broadcasting about Military combats against insurgents, the disappearing or murders of people, and the huge economic divide between the Northern and Southern Philippines. The media has successfully desensitized me and other Mindanaons to corrupt strongmen leaders that impose fear and public humiliation when not followed. Veronica’s film demonstrated the media’s obligation to correct this by delivering news that emphasizes the rule of law and people’s democratic rights. She also illustrated the need to relate events that came after the Martial Law, to account for those who are responsible for the long history of neglect and discrimination that forced vulnerable communities into armed rebellion, into a tribunal. More importantly, the media has the power to innoculate Filipinos to aspire to the ideal leaders we need as a democratic nation. It is salient not only to commemorate the Marcos regime but also to realize that a man’s lack of moral stamina, patience, and tolerance, imprisoned a nation to a never-ending chain of poverty.

    Like

  19. name: Sylvo

    The film follows a middle-class couple with conservative ideals. They are doing their best to raise their five sons under the brutal dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos. Their sons express teenage rebellion and revolt against living in a martial law state. The father struggles to accept the disparities in their sons ideas.

    The mother will be the driving force in the narrative. She is led on a journey of self-discovery to understand who she is as a wife, mother, and woman.

    When the family becomes affected by the dictatorship, Amanda starts to develop her own dissident view.

    As I am writing this in the middle of the assembly for CMC students, I am fueled by the passion of the people. This film really resonated with me, especially since I can see my parents in the characters of Amnada and Julian.

    In this film we can see how ideals are shaped by our direct reality. On this day 50 years ago, September 21, 1972, the free press in the nation were the first to be attacked when the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos declared Martial Law. He made sure he had the last say regarding his purported truth. This is reflected in the film how the media is being silenced. Its implied throughout the film that the truth is being repressed.

    In Media Law, this is a clear case of censorship. Marcos stripped the media of all authoritym There is freedom out there that is worth pursuing, whether we are fighting for our love of ourselves, our families, or the entire country.

    Towards the end, the Bartolome family joins forces with the resistance movement at the film’s conclusion to depose Ferdinand Marcos as president. The film is a great celebration of the challenges that every Filipino must overcome in order to achieve freedom, something to fight for. As I’m surrounded by people in this mob, I resonate with the anger and the passion of the people. This film is still very timely and is a harrowing reminder of the truth we still live today.

    Like

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