6th Media Monitor here (& heads up for 4th & 5th bonus) #universityofthephilippines #UPDiliman

The 6th media monitor can be posted here (or any bonuses not yet submitted). Deadline for the 6th media monitor is extended to this Wednesday at noontime or Oct. 5 at 12 noon.

    As a heads-up, the 4th bonus is on reporting on surveys, using the guidelines of ethics taken up in class. As there are no elections locally in the coming months and no recent surveys seem to be forthcoming, you may monitor surveys being used by news media organizations on the US election (Hillary-Trump), which anyway impacts indirectly on the Philippines; or any current news reporting of any relevant opinion poll.

    The 5th bonus is on news reports on the occult, superstitious beliefs, etc. in the run-up to All Souls Day, All Saints Day, etc. Embedded, here again are  the pertinent KBP Broadcast Code provisions, with the main provision  numbered by the KBP as Article 13,  in keeping with the superstition-based nature of the provision — i’m messing with you. But here is the provision again:

KBP Broadcast Code: ” “Art. 13 SUPERSTITION AND THE OCCULT: “Sec.1 Programs featuring superstitious and pseudo-scientific beliefs and practices, such as supernatural powers, foretelling of the future, astrology, phrenology, palm-reading, numerology, mind-reading, hypnotism, faith healing or similar subjects shall be careful not to induce belief in them. Care shall be taken to prevent the exploitation of people who may be easily swayed by such superstitious and pseudo-scientific beliefs and practices.
“Sec.2.Programs or program materials that promote or encourage occult practices, black magic, witchcraft, and similar activities are prohibited.” (KBP Broadcast Code)

     The monitor should be of news reports aired or published this month, not last year’s or of past years — that’s media history, not media monitor. Happy ghost-hunting!

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30 thoughts on “6th Media Monitor here (& heads up for 4th & 5th bonus) #universityofthephilippines #UPDiliman

  1. 6th Media Monitor [5th Bonus: News reports on the occult, superstitious beliefs, etc.]

    In an article published by Northbound Philippines News online, last Sept 7, 2016, the author writes about penumbral eclipses. There was supposedly a penumbral lunar eclipse that happened last Sept. 17, and that it is a normal event. Dario dela Cruz, astronomy chief of Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration mentioned that, “It’s not something to be feared.” Apparently, there is a global centuries-old association between eclipses, fear and superstition. In this case, we must not believe in such superstitions, the expert says.

    The article clearly follows the KBP Broadcast Code on superstitions and the occult. It is stated that programs (and published materials) that may contain superstitions, pseudo scientific beliefs and practices, etc. shall be careful not to induce belief in them. To add to this, programs and materials that promote occult practices, black magic, etc. are prohibited. The author was able to follow these two sections in the article pertaining to superstitions and the occult.

    Source

    http://northboundasia.com/2016/09/07/nothing-alarming-penumbral-eclipses-expert/#.V_JHkpN95E4

  2. [6TH MEDIA MONITOR – 4th BONUS POST ON SURVEYS]

    Among many other news organizations, Sunstar Davao and Philstar Global both posted articles regarding a Social Weather Stations(SWS) survey concerned with the percentage of people who express fear of drug addicts in different areas in the Philippines. In general, I found that both news organizations failed to report on the said survey accurately and sufficiently.

    Both articles stated who did the survey, when they did the survey and of course, results of the survey – citing the increase or decrease on the total percentage of people expressing fear of drug addicts in a particular area over a period of time. However, only Sunstar was able to include the sample size, sample profile and margin of error while the Philstar article failed to do so. In terms of data analysis, i think that both failed to interpret the data from the survey and only directly stated them on their articles without further writing its implications. Also, other important information on the survey such as the methods of interview, sample size and margin of error (for Philstar) weren’t included. It was a good thing though that both articles were able to provide a context or basically, what was going on during the periods that the survey was taken. But other than that, I think that they should’ve worked on their articles more and give an accurate and insightful view on the results of the said survey.

    Links for references:
    http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/10/04/1630168/62-pinoys-fear-addicts-sws-poll
    http://www.sunstar.com.ph/davao/local-news/2016/10/03/sws-62-filipinos-afraid-drug-addicts-q2-501316

  3. [Sixth Media Monitor: Fourth Bonus Point “Surveys”]

    The upcoming national elections in the United States brought about a wave of pre-election polls. Along with this is the article published by CNN about the survey conducted by CNN and ORC International (a market-research agency). “Poll: Nine weeks out, a near even race” by Jennifer Ageista states official poll results of the presidential race in the US. The article even included the full scientific survey results.

    This article is a good example of ethical reporting of surveys. Ageista disclosed the sample size, methodology, and margin of error of the election poll. Furthermore, the survey spreadsheet included who did the survey, when it was conducted, and what type of people they asked.

    As per the Philippine Press Institute’s (PPI) Code of Professional and Ethical Conduct, statistical data derived from polls are susceptible to misinterpretation and misunderstanding. Therefore, the sample size and margin of error should always be disclosed.

    References:
    http://edition.cnn.com/2016/09/06/_politics-zone-injection/trump-vs-clinton-presidential-polls-election-2016/
    http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2016/images/09/07/rel13a.-.2016.post-labor.day.pdf

  4. (6TH MEDIA MONITOR – 4th BONUS POST ON SURVEYS)

    Philstar Global posted articles about the Social Weather Stations survey about the percentage of people who express fear of drug addicts.

    Philstar Global cited the decrease and increase of percentage of people who express fear of drug addicts. But, Philstar Global failed to include the margin of error. The article only stated the results without indicating its implications. It also failed to include the methods of interview and sample size.

    According to the Philippine Press Institute’s (PPI) Code of Professional and Ethical Conduct, statistical data derived from polls are susceptible to misinterpretation and misunderstanding. That’s the reason why the sample size and margin of error should always be disclosed.

    References:
    http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/10/04/1630168/62-pinoys-fear-addicts-sws-poll

  5. 4TH BONUS MEDIA MONITOR

    The article, Post-debate, Clinton takes the lead, tells about the reaction of the people to the presidential debate conducted.

    The article says that 47% of likely voters are in favor of Clinton over 42% in favor of Trump.

    The article disclosed the margin of error which is 35, the number of the sample size, how was the survey conducted, and when it was conducted.

    According to the PPI Code of Ethics, reports on survey should be backed with the margin of error.

    Link to the article: http://edition.cnn.com/2016/10/03/politics/hillary-clinton-donald-trump-presidential-polls/

  6. Sixth Media Monitor – Fourth Bonus Post
    [ News Reports on superstitious beliefs, occult, etc.]

    Freshly released today is news-feature article about a string of stories of horror and mystery that GMA 7’s program Karelasyon will offer audiences. Entitled, ” Tikbalang na sisira sa isang pamilya”, the article vividly explains the harrowing experience of a couple who went at odds because of a mysterious creature. Their names are revealed along with their story.

    This program actually follows the KBP Code concerning the disclaimer it places that certain prominent actors are going to portray the roles. From this, a normal viewer can decipher that it is something staged and serves mainly for entertainment.

    Its downside on the other hand is on how it did not contain any tag at the end stating the premise of the method used to drive off the mysterious creature in the said story. It actually serves a dual purpose, one is to pull in more viewers and to give a perspective on this mysterious world and how it works.

    The important point here is on how universal themes and values are reinforced here though mysterious beliefs and occults are the primary subjects. The practice of occult practices are not emphasized, but the human values we consider vital.

  7. [Third Bonus Post: Superstition]

    Source: http://www.mb.com.ph/is-there-a-new-zodiac-chart/

    The new viral issue among a lot of millenials right now is the shifting of the zodiac chart. Essentially, the birthdate requirement for each zodiac sign shifted, meaning a lot of people’s original signs were changed. The Manila Bulletin articles delves into the hot topic, however, with questionable sources.

    The articles cites two main sources, one is NASA and the other is Teen Vogue. While NASA deals with astronomy and not astrology, it is clearly a more credible source than Teen Vogue when it comes to issues like this. Citing Teen Vogue goes against the KBP Code of Ethics provision which states “Programs featuring superstitious and pseudo-scientific beliefs and practices, such as supernatural powers, foretelling of the future, astrology, phrenology, palm-reading, numerology, mind-reading, hypnotism, faith healing or similar subjects shall be careful not to induce belief in them. Care shall be taken to prevent the exploitation of people who may be easily swayed by such superstitious and pseudo-scientific beliefs and practices.”

    The article did try to balance the news out by citing NASA, though, so props to the author! We have to rely on more credible sources though, if we do not want to mislead the readers.

  8. [6th Regular Media Monitor]
    Article: http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/10/04/1630168/62-pinoys-fear-addicts-sws-poll

    The article reports on an SWS survey that says 62% of Filipinos fear drug addicts. This is an important survey to contextualize since it legitimizes Duterte’s war on drugs. PPI’s Code of Ethical and Professional conduct state that “In using scientific polls, the sample size and the margin of error should be disclosed.” The two were not stated in the report. We’re not even sure if this is a representative sample or not. The article stated the wording of the question which is “The survey found 62 percent of families agreeing with the statement, “In this neighborhood there are already very many people addicted to banned drugs (Sa lugar na ito, napakarami na ang mga taong na-aadik sa mga ipinagbabawal na gamot).” It’s good that they stated the wording of the question but it is clear that the interpretation is wrong as can be seen in the headline: “62% of Pinoys fear addicts – SWS poll” 62% of Pinoys don’t fear drug addicts, instead, given the wording of the question, 62% think that there are many drug addicts in their neighborhood. Thinking that your neigborhood has many drug addicts doesn’t instantly mean that you’re afraid of them. It’s good that they contextualized when the report was taken though, which is a few days before Duterte swore the oath to be president.

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