News or feature reports on Red-tagging, other forms of hate speech (advance notice of bonuses, Media Monitor)

News or feature reports on Red-tagging, other forms of hate speech (advance notice of bonuses, Media Monitor)

      A review of news stories or feature reports on Red-tagging and other forms of hate speech or verbal attacks (whether as jokes, speeches, interpersonal communication) based on gender or gender identity, race, religion, ethnic origin, national origin, disability, physical appearance, etc.

     An example is the following news feature (a GOOD EXAMPLE) on Philippine Star:
From Philippine Star “For Lumad schools, even holding class is a struggle” by Jonathan de Santos (philstar.com) – July 11, 2018 – 11:33am at

https://www.philstar.com/headlines/2018/07/11/1831716/lumad-schools-even-holding-class-struggle

is a news report on Red-tagging by President Duterte against the Lumads. The news feature is a GOOD EXAMPLE and illustrates the following SPJ provisions:
“-Be vigilant and courageous about holding those with power accountable. Give voice to the voiceless.” (SPJ 2014)
“– Boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear.” (SPJ 2014)
Here are portions of the article (set here in itals) :
    President Rodrigo Duterte, a year ago, threatened to bomb Lumad schools—volunteer-run schools for indigenous peoples’ communities in remote parts of Mindanao—for, he said, indoctrinating children into socialism.
     “I will use the armed forces, the Philippine Air force. I’ll really have those bombed… because you are operating illegally and you are teaching the children to rebel against government,” he said in remarks that were later walked back after criticism from rights groups and from representatives of the communities themselves.
    xxx Often set up in what the Department of Education calls Geographically Isolated and Disadvantaged Areas that government schools may not be able to reach, the Lumad schools provide lessons in numeracy, literacy and skills like carpentry, sewing and agriculture.
      xxx Education, not assimilation
       But indigenous peoples’ education—and the Lumad schools—is not new, nor necessarily a form of rebellion. It requires, however, a shift in perspective that is, in a way, a revolution away from a one-size-fits-all curriculum.
      One way to look at IP education, Maria Lourie Victor with the Department of Education’s Indigenous Peoples Education Office said, is through the monggo and gumamela.
      For generations of Filipino students, they were the go-to learning aids for lessons on plants. Their use, though, takes for granted that these are available and familiar across the country’s more than 7,000 islands.
     Victor said in an interview with Philstar.com that although the old curriculum worked, it was prescriptive and not always culturally appropriate.

     Beyond the choice of teaching aids, she said, the old curriculum risked erasing an IP group’s own culture and history. xxx (From the Philippine Star)

Other bonus topics include:

A review of news stories or feature reports, opinion, etc. on the “Buwan ng Wika) (please render the discussion in Filipino)

    A review of news stories, feature reports, etc. on superstition and the occult (illustrating Article 13 of the KBP Broadcast Code

   Advertorials

   (the list of bonus topics will again be provided when the window for the media monitor is opened next week). 

 

 

For Ethics classes: 2014 Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics ( 2014 SPJ )

2014 Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics ( 2014 SPJ )

SOCIETY OF PROFESSIONAL JOURNALISTS CODE OF ETHICS 2014

SPJ Code of Ethics, Revised September 6, 2014 at 4:49 p.m. CT at SPJ’s National Convention

(“The SPJ Code of Ethics is a statement of abiding principles supported by additional explanations and position papers (at spj.org) that address changing journalistic practices. It is not a set of rules, rather a guide that encourages all who engage in journalism to take responsibility for the information they provide, regardless of medium.xxx”)

Preamble

Members of the Society of Professional Journalists believe that public enlightenment is the forerunner of justice and the foundation of democracy. Ethical journalism strives to ensure the free exchange of information that is accurate, fair and thorough. An ethical journalist acts with integrity.

The Society declares these four principles as the foundation of ethical journalism and encourages their use in its practice by all people in all media.

SEEK TRUTH AND REPORT IT

Ethical journalism should be accurate and fair. Journalists should be honest and courageous in gathering, reporting and interpreting information.

Journalists should:

– Take responsibility for the accuracy of their work. Verify information before releasing it. Use original sources whenever possible.
– Remember that neither speed nor format excuses inaccuracy.
– Provide context. Take special care not to misrepresent or oversimplify in promoting, previewing or summarizing a story.
– Gather, update and correct information throughout the life of a news story.
– Be cautious when making promises, but keep the promises they make.
– Identify sources clearly. The public is entitled to as much information as possible to judge the reliability and motivations of sources.
– Consider sources’ motives before promising anonymity. Reserve anonymity for sources who may face danger, retribution or other harm, and have information that cannot be obtained elsewhere. Explain why anonymity was granted.
– Diligently seek subjects of news coverage to allow them to respond to criticism or allegations of wrongdoing.
– Avoid undercover or other surreptitious methods of gathering information unless traditional, open methods will not yield information vital to the public.
– Be vigilant and courageous about holding those with power accountable. Give voice to the voiceless.
– Support the open and civil exchange of views, even views they find repugnant.
– Recognize a special obligation to serve as watchdogs over public affairs and government. Seek to ensure that the public’s business is conducted in the open, and that public records are open to all.
– Provide access to source material when it is relevant and appropriate.

– Boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear.
– Avoid stereotyping. Journalists should examine the ways their values and experiences may shape their reporting.
– Label advocacy and commentary.
– Never deliberately distort facts or context, including visual information. Clearly label illustrations and re-enactments.
– Never plagiarize. Always attribute.

MINIMIZE HARM

Ethical journalism treats sources, subjects, colleagues and members of the public as human beings deserving of respect.

Journalists should:

– Balance the public’s need for information against potential harm or discomfort. Pursuit of the news is not a license for arrogance or undue intrusiveness.
– Show compassion for those who may be affected by news coverage. Use heightened sensitivity when dealing with juveniles, victims of sex crimes, and sources or subjects who are inexperienced or unable to give consent. Consider cultural differences in approach and treatment.

– Recognize that legal access to information differs from an ethical justification to publish or broadcast.

-Realize that private people have a greater right to control information about themselves than public figures and others who seek power, influence or attention. Weigh the consequences of publishing or broadcasting personal information.
– Avoid pandering to lurid curiosity, even if others do.
– Balance a suspect’s right to a fair trial with the public’s right to know. Consider the implications of identifying criminal suspects before they face legal charges.
– Consider the long-term implications of the extended reach and permanence of publication. Provide updated and more complete information as appropriate.

ACT INDEPENDENTLY

The highest and primary obligation of ethical journalism is to serve the public.

Journalists should:

– Avoid conflicts of interest, real or perceived. Disclose unavoidable conflicts.
– Refuse gifts, favors, fees, free travel and special treatment, and avoid political and other outside activities that may compromise integrity or impartiality, or may damage credibility.
– Be wary of sources offering information for favors or money; do not pay for access to news. Identify content provided by outside sources, whether paid or not.
– Deny favored treatment to advertisers, donors or any other special interests, and resist internal and external pressure to influence coverage.
– Distinguish news from advertising and shun hybrids that blur the lines between the two. Prominently label sponsored content.

BE ACCOUNTABLE AND TRANSPARENT

Ethical journalism means taking responsibility for one’s work and explaining one’s decisions to the public.

Journalists should:

– Explain ethical choices and processes to audiences. Encourage a civil dialogue with the public about journalistic practices, coverage and news content.
– Respond quickly to questions about accuracy, clarity and fairness.
– Acknowledge mistakes and correct them promptly and prominently. Explain corrections and clarifications carefully and clearly.
– Expose unethical conduct in journalism, including within their organizations.
– Abide by the same high standards they expect of others.

                                           ∗ ∗ ∗

Ethics 2018

Optionally: tap the “play arrow” (if on mobile device, click “Listen in browser”)

 

 

       E T H I C S     2018

 

 

(photo by Misael Bacani of the U.P. Diliman Information Office, used here non-commercially for academic purposes. Photo shows the original Oblation sculpture)

Communication and Media Ethics marichulambino

Topics include:

2014 Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and case studies

Philippine Press Code of Ethics and case studies

Expanded Philippine Press Code of Ethics case studies

KBP Broadcast Code and case studies

MTRCB standards and illustration

Documentary filmmakers on ethical challenges and contemporary issues

Charter for the Safety of Journalists Working in War Zones or Dangerous Areas and discussion of guidelines

ASC Advertising Code of Ethics

Social Media community standards

(special topics)

Corruption in the Press, an investigative report

Disaster-Reporting

Conflict Reporting

Interviewing criminal suspects

14th & last Media Monitor with new, additional bonus topics

The 14th and last Media Monitor (either regular or bonus) can be posted here with the following new, additional bonus topics — choose one from these or from the earlier lists, without repeating any bonus topic that you have already written about; or post one regular media monitor post (only one media monitor post will be given points).

    New, additional bonus topics: 

   Any media content on today’s decision on the quo warranto proceeding to oust the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court;

  Any media content on the TRAIN law;

 Any media content on the SWS survey showing a 12-point-fall in net satisfaction rating of Duterte.

  The deadline is on the usual Wednesday 5pm. The fourth and last exams will push thru as scheduled. Please be prompt.

   It has been a most eventful semester.

      Thank you for  insight inside the classroom and in the media monitor pages — and your indomitable spirit outside the walls of the University.