Trigger warnings First course (optional, 10pts)

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Trigger warnings First course (optional, 10pts)

        (As stated on orientation day: Pls post the results of the assignment here, in the comments box, for ten points (see “Orientation Day” or confer with your classmates if you are not able to read.) Pls use your pseudonym as shown in your gravatar, or your nickname, or your student number. As stated in the instructions: Pls give examples of trigger warnings, not generic descriptions; put them in quotes. Tnx. )

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20 thoughts on “Trigger warnings First course (optional, 10pts)

  1. “Content Notice: This semester our objects of study deal with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry, and violence. As a result, this class will be a space to think deeply about explicit and, in some cases, disturbing texts … ”
    — Ismail Muhammad, graduate student instructor at University of California, Berkeley

    “This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence … ”
    an excerpt from the syllabus of her Sexual Violence, Justice and the Law class:
    — Meredith Loken, doctoral student at the University of Washington
    “I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.”
    — Steven Hammer, assistant professor of communication and digital media, Saint Joseph’s University. His class is Advanced Web Audio & Video Production
    Examples 1-3 are retrieved from
    npr .org sections codeswitch 2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    “This is hard history. It’s hard to talk about, hard to absorb. It’s filled with trauma, sexual violence, racial violence, visual images of murder and chaos. You may walk into my classroom and see an image of a lynching that was put on a postcard. This is America.”
    — Hasan Jeffries, an associate professor of history at Ohio State University, said in an interview that heavy emotions — even tears — are parts of the learning process that he welcomes. He teaches African-American and U.S. history.
    Retrieved from npr .org sections ed 2016/09/07/492979242/half-of-professors-in-npr-ed-survey-have-used-trigger-warnings
    It is my goal in this class to create a safe environment in which we examine our assumptions… Discomfort can be part of the learning process as we are challenged to shift our paradigms. I invite you to sit with this discomfort. However, if the discomfort starts to turn to distress, I want you to take care of yourself. You can withdraw from an activity or even leave the classroom.
    — Kyla Bender-Baird teaching sociology courses
    ‘This is not a class about your personal life.’”
    –Caroline Heldman, a professor in Occidental University’s politics department
    “Over the course of the semester, we will be examining topics that may be emotionally triggering for trauma survivors”
    — Caroline Heldman, a professor in Occidental University’s politics department
    “If you are a trauma survivor, please develop a self-care plan for the semester so that you can effectively engage the course material and participate in class.”
    — Caroline Heldman, a professor in Occidental University’s politics department
    “I will not give trigger warnings, except to say here that the literature in this course contains a good deal of nontrivial sexism, racism, violence, and so forth,”
    — Dr. Mo Pareles, a postdoctoral fellow in Medieval Literature at Northwestern University, uses a similarly straightforward disclaimer for her Medieval Humans and Beasts class
    Examples 5-9 are retrieved from
    flavorwire .com 520346 teaching-trigger-warnings-what-pundits-dont-understand-about-the-years-most-controversial-higher-ed-debate
    “This is going to be a difficult class, and part of what is going to be difficult in this class is that if you are like the 700 or so students who have preceded you here, you are wobbly in English grammar and usage.”
    — John McIntyre on the first day of his copy editing class at the Loyola University Maryland’s Department of Communication.
    Retrieved from
    huffingtonpost .com entry john-mcintyre-professor-trigger-warning-new-students_us_57da2cc7e4b0071a6e05670b

  2. 2014-89394

    Examples
    1. Descriptions/pictures of violence or warfare (including instruments of violence, such as knives or guns)
    2. Descriptions/pictures of medical procedures, serious injury, death, and other events containing blood or gore.
    3. Discussion/Description of abuse whether it is physical, mental, verbal, emotional, or sexual.
    4. Discussion of rape and sexual assualt
    5. Discussion of sex concerning pregnancy, abortion or miscarriages
    6. Discussion of drug use and suicides
    7. Discussion of Self-injurious behavior (self-harm, eating disorders, etc.)
    8. Description/Pictures of animal death or cruelty
    9. Description or Discussion of child abuse, child pornography, pedophilia, and other forms of abuse or assualt
    10. Excessive showing of violence

  3. 2014-89394

    Examples
    1. WARNING: The following images contain graphic content
    2. The following content is is not suitable for audiences with heart conditions
    3. The articles on this web site contain racial slurs that may be deemed unacceptable
    4. The following program contains scenes of rape and risk behaviors
    5. WARNING: This class might inspire intrusive thoughts in people with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
    6. NOTICE: The following forum contains strong coarse language and sexual references
    7. The preceding program contains scenes of extreme violence and nudity
    8. WARNING: This class contains medical procedures that will deal blood, needles, corpse, skeletons, and skulls.
    9. WARNING: One of the course requirements of this class is a production of play that contains “a variety of scenes that reference gory, abusive and misogynistic violence”
    10. WARNING: The following program contains topic of body shaming and eating disorders

  4. 13 Reasons Why
    Based on Jay Asher’s novel of the same title, 13 Reasons Why is a series from Netflix that tells the story of a girl who committed suicide. Due to the sensitivity of the topic and the inclusion of graphic scenes, trigger warnings were included before the start of its episodes. The following is a trigger warning that appears at the beginning of episodes 9, 12, and 13 of the said series.

    “The following episode contains scenes that some viewers may find disturbing and/or may not be suitable for younger audiences, including graphic depictions of rape and sexual assault. Viewer discretion is advised.”

    source: http://www.businessinsider.com/13-reasons-why-adds-message-at-start-of-show-2017-5

    MTRCB ratings for various shows
    Locally, the Movie and Television Review and Classification Board (MTRCB) is the body mandated to classify motion pictures, TV programs, and publicity materials based on the content of the said programs. In particular, their SPG (or Strong Parental Guidance classification of TV shows works as a trigger warning that helps advise viewers on the possible the inclusion of themes, language, violence, sex, horror, and drugs which may be sensitive to some viewers, especially children.

    Before a program with this rating begins, the MTRCB advisory clip is shown with the following narration:

    “This program is rated SPG. It contains scenes with themes, language, violence, sex, horror, or drugs which may not be suitable for children. Strong Parental Guidance is advised.”

    Gender Studies Course, Stirling University
    In an article discussing trigger warnings in the academe from Mail Online UK, one of the examples cited is that of an unspecified gender studies course at the Stirling University. The trigger warning provided in this class goes:

    “We cannot anticipate or exclude the possibility that you may encounter material which is triggering [ie, which can trigger a negative reaction] and we urge that you take all necessary precautions to look after yourself in and around the programme.”

    Students are then told that they can leave the class if they feel the need to, but are asked to check in later in the day to allow the faculty to check on them.

    source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4089302/Bible-students-warned-crucifixion-upsetting-Critics-say-trigger-warnings-distressing-content-creating-generation-snowflake-students.html

    TIME’s photos from Duterte’s war on drugs
    With thousands (and counting) victims, President Duterte’s campaign against drugs gained the attention from international press. In an article published by TIME, local photographers have shared the pictures they have captured which moved them the most. Accompanying these photos were narrations of the explanations behind these shots and the significance they hold. A warning at the beginning of the article goes as follows:

    “Warning: Some of the following images are graphic in nature and might be disturbing to some viewers.”

    source: http://time.com/philippines-rodrigo-duterte-drug-war-local-photographers/

    Tom and Jerry carries trigger warning tags on Amazon and Apple
    Tom and Jerry is cartoon series known for its slapstick comedy. However, Amazon and Apple acknowledge the racial and ethnic stereotypes presented in the show. The Federalist reports that the two companies have tagged the said show for these reasons. The disclaimer goes:

    “These animated shorts are products of their time. Some of them may depict some of the ethnic and racial prejudices that were commonplace in American society. These depictions were wrong then and are wrong today. While the following does not represent the views of Warner Bros. view of today’s society, these animated shorts are being presented as they were originally created, because to do otherwise would be the same as claiming these prejudices never existed.”

    source: http://thefederalist.com/2014/10/06/tom-and-jerry-now-has-a-trigger-warning-must-comedy-have-disclaimers/

    Royal Court’s online site
    The Royal Court is a theater located in Sloane Square, London. As part of its services, the management offers assistance to visitors who may vulnerable to the possible harmful effects of certain media content. The message from the official site says:

    “We don’t want to spoil anyone’s experience of a new play at the Royal Court and therefore avoid giving too much away when promoting the play. It’s often the unexpected shared moments and plot twists that capture the audience and create the debate and conversation beyond the performance.

    However we’re also conscious that these moments can be particularly distressing for some individuals. If there are certain themes that you know would cause you extreme distress or allergies which could cause you discomfort and you’d like to speak to one of the Royal Court team to find out more about a show before you book, you can call the Box Office on 020 7565 5000 or email us on info@royalcourttheatre.com.”

    source: https://royalcourttheatre.com/your-visit/trigger-warnings/

    University of Waterloo
    In an article filed under University of Waterloo’s Teaching Tips, a discussion on the current debates on the place of Trigger warning inside the classroom examines the two contradicting standpoints on the issue. Instructors in this institution are given the prerogative on whether they will include trigger warnings or not in their course materials. Following this, suggested ways of stating the warnings were indicated. One of which goes:

    “Our classroom provides an open space for the critical and civil exchange of ideas. Some readings and other content in this course will include topics that some students may find offensive and/or traumatizing. I’ll aim to forewarn students about potentially disturbing content and I ask all students to help to create an atmosphere of mutual respect and sensitivity.”

    source: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger

    HBO’s Pay TV Content Descriptors
    Somewhat similar to the abovementioned classification rating from MTRCB, HBO also uses standard Pay TV Content Descriptors to give viewers an idea of what they are about to watch. The system used by HBO is individually specified for each program where possible trigger-inducing elements are enumerated. An example of which is the following:

    “The following program is rated TV-MA and contains Adult Content, Graphic Violence, Nudity, Rape.”

    source: https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2014/05/what-trigger-warning-activists-and-critics-can-learn-from-hbo/371137/

    Jonathan Rauch’s suggested trigger warning for college campuses
    Following the debates on the significance and effectiveness of trigger warning in the academe, a commentary by Jonathan Rauch, a writer at NY Daily News and author of ‘Kindly Inquisitors: The New Attacks on Free Thought.’ He proposes the following trigger warning that may be used by college campuses:

    “Warning: Although this university values and encourages civil expression and respectful personal behavior, you may at any moment, and without further notice, encounter ideas, expressions and images that are mistaken, upsetting, dangerous, prejudiced, insulting or deeply offensive. We call this education.”

    source: http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/jonathan-rauch-new-trigger-warning-college-kids-article-1.2431527

    Example Trigger Warning from a Harvard Law School student organization
    HALT, an organization run by students from Harvard Law School, advocates for the rights of victims of campus sexual harassment and assault. In an a publication discussing the necessity of trigger warnings in the campus, the author provides the following example of a trigger warning which the said writer is an combination of the warnings he or she has accessed:

    “We are discussing sexual assault tomorrow; this is especially difficult material, and, statistically speaking, there are some few sexual assault survivors in this class. I want to remind you that mental health services are available, and that you can come to office hours if you have thoughts about the material that you were not comfortable sharing in class.”

    source: https://orgs.law.harvard.edu/halt/trauma-recognition-in-law-schools/why-professors-should-warn-about-course-content/

    (mrcruz1 / SN: 2015-02241)

  5. Ten Trigger Warnings taken from Various Colleges/Universities and Media/Media Organizations

    Trigger warning regarding the contents of a history course.
    “At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you suspect that specific material is likely to be emotionally challenging for you, I’d be happy to discuss any concerns you may have before the subject comes up in class. Likewise, if you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to course material with the class or with me individually afterwards, I welcome such discussions as an appropriate part of our classwork.
    If you ever feel the need to step outside during a class discussion you may always do so without academic penalty. You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually to discuss the situation.”
    From professor and historian Angus Johnston (retrieved from https://studentactivism.net/
    2015/08/25/trigger-warnings-for-syllabi-a-how-to-one-year-along/).
    Trigger warning towards the discussion of taboo and violent practices by other cultures.
    Joanna Hunter, who teaches sociology at Radford University in Virginia, told NPR Ed last week that she has given a warning before explaining the practice of female genital mutilation, within the broader context of a discussion of cultural relativism.”
    From Anya Kamenetz writer of the article ‘Half of Professors in NPR Ed Survey Have Used ‘Trigger Warnings’’ (retrieved from http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/09/07/492979242/
    half-of-professors-in-npr-ed-survey-have-used-trigger-warnings)
    Trigger warning concerning lectures of historical events containing racial violence, sexual violence, criminal violence and etc.
    “Hasan Jeffries, an associate professor of history at Ohio State University… tells his students at the beginning of each course, “This is hard history. It’s hard to talk about, hard to absorb. It’s filled with trauma, sexual violence, racial violence, visual images of murder and chaos. You may walk into my classroom and see an image of a lynching that was put on a postcard. This is America.”
    From Anya Kamenetz writer of the article ‘Half of Professors in NPR Ed Survey Have Used ‘Trigger Warnings’’ (retrieved from http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/09/07/492979242/
    half-of-professors-in-npr-ed-survey-have-used-trigger-warnings)
    Trigger warning for films that depicts violence, sexual assault, male/female nudity or psychological torture.
    “Hateful 8

    * Multiple onscreen deaths by gun and hanging
    * Sexual assault both described in detail and portrayed on screen
    * Full frontal male nudity
    * Psychological torture/abuse by describing rape”
    From Tumblr user Ruth Spalding on Tumblr’s Trigger Warning Database (retrieved from http://
    twdatabase.tumblr.com/post/137993511581/hateful-8

    Trigger warning for television shows or series that depict child abuse, sexual abuse, physical abuse, mental abuse, emotional abuse, verbal abuse and etc.
    “Strange Empire S01E06 (Electricity)
    Rape and Sexual Assault: About 35 minutes into content (commercials not counted – but near the end of the show), John Slotter rapes his wife Isabelle – graphic
    Abuse (physical, mental, emotional, verbal, sexual): Also near the end of the episode (25 – 30 minutes of content in), past emotional/verbal abuse of a child is described. As well, all throughout the show, there are instances of men bullying and controlling their wives.
    Child abuse/pedophilia: See above…”
    From Tumblr user trisockatops on Tumblr’s Trigger Warning Guide (retrieved from http://trigger-warning-guide.tumblr.com/post/133933735563/strange-empire-s01e06-electricity)
    Trigger warning for films that depict illegal gene experiments, rape and incest.
    “Splice (2009)
    Genetic engineers Clive Nicoli and Elsa Kast hope to achieve fame by successfully splicing together the DNA of different animals to create new hybrid animals for medical use…
    TW: graphic rape scene; tones of statutory rape and incest.”
    From IMDB member flamingninjaofthemist (retrieved from http://www.imdb.com/title/ tt1017460/)
    Trigger warning for films centered around the topic of sexual violence, suicide and child loss.
    “World’s Greatest Dad (2009 film)
    Known Triggers*:
    Sexualized Violence (via auto-erotic asphyxiation)
    Suicide / Suicidal Imagery (strongly featured)
    Major Character Death (happens fairly early on)
    Self-Harm / Cutting
    Slurs (the movie features heavy use of explicit/obscene racist, sexist, and homophobic comments)
    Voyeurism (a teenage boy takes a creepshot)
    Death of a Child.”
    From Tumblr user THISCOULDBETRIGGERING on Tumblr’s ThisCouldBeTriggering page (retrieved from http://thiscouldbetriggering.tumblr .com/post/164055336944/worlds-greatest-dad-2009-film-note-vague)
    Trigger waring for films that depict child molestation.
    “Todd Berliner, a film-studies professor at the University of North Carolina, told Heat Street that he started using trigger warnings after he showed the film Festen, a dark movie about a family gathering, and a student approached him after saying he or she wished there had been a warning because he/she had been molested as a child.”
    From Katherine Timpf, writer of the article “Often, trigger warnings are more insulting than kind” (retrieved from http://www.nationalreview.com/article/441212/professor-university-placed-trigger-warning-movie-clueless)
    Trigger warning for course topics centered on “underage sex, self-harm, drug use, homelessness, Aids, ‘queer lifestyles’ and religion.”
    “Goldsmiths university advises undergraduates studying youth cultures that they can “take time out” in classes that examine the sensitive subject matter, warning the course examines issues that “might be sensitive for some” including underage sex, self-harm, drug use, homelessness, Aids, “queer lifestyles” and religion.”
    From May Bulman, writer of the article “UK universities issue ‘trigger warnings’ to warn students of potentially ‘upsetting’ material.” (retrieved from http://www.independent.co.uk/ news/uk/home-news/trigger-warnings-universities-students-us-uk-a7353061.html)
    Trigger warning for lectures on law involving “violence or death.”
    “As previously reported, even Oxford is not exempt as undergraduates studying law are being told before lectures on cases involving violence or death that they can leave if they fear the content will be too ‘distressing’.”
    From Joseph Curtis, writer of the article “’What happened to facing up to difficult things?’: Universities are forced to issue ‘trigger warnings’ ahead of lectures and let students skip topics they may find troubling” (retrieved from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3829264/What-happened-facing-difficult-things-Universities-forced-issue-trigger-warnings-ahead-lectures-let-students-skip-topics-troubling.html)

  6. 2015-00521
    \ COMM120 4-7 PM
    Examples of trigger warnings:

    Contains: Rape (graphic and shown multiple times)
    Contains: Self-harm (VERY Graphic)
    Contains: Blood (VERY Graphic)
    • Buddy Project. (2017 Aug 20). 13 Reasons Why- Triggers. Retrieved from http://www.buddy-project.org/13-reasons-why
    “This course deals with sensitive material that may be difficult for some students.”
    “The reading for this week includes a graphic description of sexual assault.”
    • Downes, S. (2016 Sept 10). Trigger warnings, safe spaces and free speech, too. The New York Times. Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/11/opinion/trigger-warnings-safe-spaces-and-free-speech-too.html
    “Current Notice: This semester our objects of study deal with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry, and violence. As a result, this class will be a space to think deeply about explicit and, in some cases, disturbing texts.” -Ismail Muhammad, graduate student instructor at University of California, Berkeley
    “This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence.” – Meredith Loken, doctoral student at the University of Washington
    “I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or strongly contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.” – Steven Hammer, assistant professor of communication and digital media, Saint Joseph’s University
    • Smith, I. (2016 Sept 21). Content notice: Here are a few ways professors use trigger warnings. National Public Radio. Retrieved from http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    “suicide,” “domestic abuse,” and “graphic violence” suggested trigger warnings for The Great Gatsby
    • Flood, A. (2014 May 19). US students request ‘trigger warnings’ on literature. The Guardian. Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/may/19/us-students-request-trigger-warnings-in-literature
    “The following reading includes a discussion of the harsh treatment experienced by First Nations children in residential schools in the 1950s. This content is disturbing, so I encourage everyone to prepare themselves emotionally before proceeding. If you believe that the reading will be traumatizing for you, then you may choose to forgo it. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.”
    • University of Waterloo. (2017 Aug 20). Trigger warnings. Retrieved from https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger

  7. 2015-09568
    Comm 120 4-7 PM
    1.University of Waterloo on sexual issues

    “Next class our discussion will probably touch on the sexual assault that is depicted in the second last chapter of The White Hotel. This content is disturbing, so I encourage you to prepare yourself emotionally beforehand. If you believe that you will find the discussion to be traumatizing, you may choose to not participate in the discussion or to leave the classroom. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so if you leave the room for a significant time, please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.”

    Retrieved from : https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger

    2.University of Glasgow on religion

    “According to university documents, a lecture on Jesus and cinema sometimes ‘contains graphic scenes of the crucifixion, and this is flagged up to students beforehand’.

    Retrieved from : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4089302/Bible-students-warned-crucifixion-upsetting-Critics-say-trigger-warnings-distressing-content-creating-generation-snowflake-students.html

    3.Gabriel Moshenka of University College London on Psychology

    “Meanwhile archeology students at University College London were reportedly told last month they could leave the lecture without being penalised if they find it too “distressing”, with lecturer Gabriel Moshenka claiming it was a necessary measure as the material might induce psychological trauma.”

    Retrieved from : http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/trigger-warnings-universities-students-us-uk-a7353061.html

    4.Stirling University on archaeology

    “Archaeology students at Stirling University are issued with a ‘warning in advance of one image in a PowerPoint, which is of a well-preserved archaeological body from an archaeological context’ because of the ‘risk it is found a bit gruesome’.

    Retrived from : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4089302/Bible-students-warned-crucifixion-upsetting-Critics-say-trigger-warnings-distressing-content-creating-generation-snowflake-students.html#ixzz4qMglho

    5.Ismail Muhammad of University of Washington on certain issues

    “Content notice: this semester our objects with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry and violence. As a result, this class will be a space to think explicitly and in some cases disturbing texts..”

    Retrieved from : http://dailycaller.com/2016/09/27/trigger-warnings-in-actual-college-courses-are-as-dumb-as-you-imagine-only-more-so/

    6.Goldsmiths university on certain toics

    “ Goldsmiths university advises undergraduates studying youth cultures that they can “take time out” in classes that examine the sensitive subject matter, warning the course examines issues that “might be sensitive for some” including underage sex, self-harm, drug use, homelessness, Aids, “queer lifestyles” and religion.”

    Retrieved from : http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/trigger-warnings-universities-students-us-uk-a7353061.html

    Trigger warning activist giving examples of some book classics

    “The New York Times reports that activists want many classics to have trigger warnings in effect printed on them like health advisories on cigarette packages. “The Merchant of Venice,” for instance, would need the label “contains anti-Semitism.” Virginia Woolf’s “Mrs. Dalloway” would need a warning that it discusses suicide. Oberlin’s memo advised faculty that Chinua Achebe’s “Things Fall Apart,” may “trigger readers who have experienced racism, colonialism, religious persecution, violence, suicide and more.”

    Retrieved from : http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-goldberg-trigger-warnings-20140520-column.html

    8.Meredith Loken of the University of Washington sexuality

    “This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse and your are expected to complete assignments regarding these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony and description of sexual violence..”

    Retrieved from : http://dailycaller.com/2016/09/27/trigger-warnings-in-actual-college-courses-are-as-dumb-as-you-imagine-only-more-so/

    9.Newcastle University on sexual assault warns and give students an option

    “The option was given to not attend the lectures, or subsidiary film screenings and seminars, due to distressing content regarding rape and sexual assault.”

    Retrieved from : http://thecourieronline.co.uk/2016/12/05/trigger-warnings-issued-over-sensitive-lecture-content/

    10.Stathclyde University on crime

    “Students of forensic science at Strathclyde University in Glasgow are given a ‘verbal warning… at the beginning of some lectures where sensitive images, involving blood patterns, crime scenes and bodies etc are in the presentation’.

    Retrived from: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4089302/Bible-students-warned-crucifixion-upsetting-Critics-say-trigger-warnings-distressing-content-creating-generation-snowflake-students.html#ixzz4qMoNE

  8. “Don’t try this at home.” (for dangerous stunts, etc.)
    “This game contains strong language and scenes of explicit violence and gore.” (computer games featuring violence)
    “The views and opinions of the guest do not necessarily reflect those of the host, the program, the management, and the network.” (The Bottomline by Boy Abunda, ABS-CBN)
    “We are not asking the LGBT community to change who they are. We are simply asking that they do not force us to change who we are either.” Barry H. Corey, President of Biola University (https://www.google.com.ph/search?q=religious+discrimination+in+american+universities&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiWkITmz-fVAhVGwbwKHf4uAhgQ_AUICygC&biw=1366&bih=652#imgrc=jQbbEshPg1IcCM🙂
    There are religious institutions in California-Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, and Islamic- all accredited, everyone of whom, in accord with all the major religions in the world, believe that gender matters, that maleness and femaleness is not arbitrary, that it’s not interchangeable, that it’s not inconsequential. -John Jackson, President of William Jessup University (http://dailysignal.com/2016/07/25/californias-war-on-my-religious-college-and-others/)
    “We will be faithful to our biblical and religious convictions no matter what the economic consequences. However, the fundamental reality is that might mean a reduction in services, it might mean a reduction in programs.” -John Jackson, President of William Jessup University (http://dailysignal.com/2016/07/25/californias-war-on-my-religious-college-and-others/)
    “You’re welcome to come, as long as you know we expect you to abide by this moral code, because we’re Catholics.” Masteller, Thomas Aquinas College (http://dailysignal.com/2016/07/25/californias-war-on-my-religious-college-and-others/)
    “I want to reassure all of you that our Muslim students are welcome at our University. Our Catholic teaching instructs us to embrace our fellow human beings of all faith traditions. They enrich us with their presence and help to promote inter-religious and inter-cultural understanding. I regret very much that our Muslim students have been used as pawns in a manufactured controversy. I urge all of you continue to show one another the respect and goodwill that are the hallmarks of The Catholic University of America.” John Garvey, President of the Catholic University of America (https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/post/catholic-u-responds-to-lawsuit-charging-muslim-discrimination/2011/10/29/gIQAd1XmZM_blog.html?utm_term=.f7a9a2cdba47)
    “The following preview has been approved for appropriate audiences.” http://katiechromepictures.blogspot.com/2015/02/film-trailer-warning.html
    “Like so many texts in the Western canon, it contains triggering and offensive material that marginalizes student identities in the classroom. These texts, wrought with histories and narratives of exclusion and oppression, can be difficult to read and discuss as a survivor, a person of color, or a student from a low-income background.” – Ovid, Columbia University
    (http://www.chronicle.com/article/Academic-Ethics-The-Legal/238356)

  9. 2015-08339
    Comm 120 1-4pm
    Captive Prince review
    Very limited literary pieces contain trigger warnings. Review sites and blogs then provide the list for readers’ benefit.
    “A few trigger warnings: rape, pedophilia and general/pleasure slavery are all found within this book. There are also scenes and mentions of physical abuse and assault such as flogging.”
    Retrived from: http://fortheloveofbooksreviews.blogspot.com/2015/07/captive-prince-by-cs-pacat.html
    Trigger warning by J. Raptor
    “WARNING: Three major themes in this novella are racism, sexism, and abuse (physical, sexual, verbal, and spiritual).”
    Retrived from: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28526425-trigger-warning
    Facebook post by Ezra Acayan
    The recent killing of 17 year old Kian delos Santos has led to the upload of graphic images and videos. Users have since reported the photo and Facebook gives its users a warning before clicking on the photo or video.
    “This photo may show graphic violence or gore”
    Retrived from: https://www.facebook.com/acayanezra/posts/1165069283592853?pnref=story.unseen-section
    Jessica Jones
    Netflix started posting trigger warnings since 13 reasons why but the Jessica Jones came before that. Tumblr user polyamoryavengers, a 26 year old med student, posted a detailed list for each episode of instances that may trigger viewers.
    “Ep 1
    18:52 Jessica is lying on a desk and starts having a dream where a man comes into screen and moves her hair off of her face and then licks up the side of her cheek and temple. Then Jessica stands up suddenly, breaking out of the nightmare, and walks around her apartment, freaking out.
    39:02 Jessica gives a non-graphic recap of a night that she was taken to a hotel against her will, with the indication that she was raped there. The discussion takes place because she fears another girl is about to go through the same thing. End 39:29.
    43:47 Jessica enters a hotel room and finds a college-age girl lying on a bed in lingerie and it’s clear that the girl has been raped. The scene continues into 46:15 where the girl gives a non-graphic account of being forced to do “things” against her will. The girl attempts to victim-blame herself, but Jess doesn’t allow it. The scene ends at 47:23”
    Retrived from: https://polyamoryavengers.tumblr.com/post/133670177906/jessica-jones-season-1-sexual-assaultnon-con-tw
    The girl with the dragon tattoo
    A blog entitled Planet Jinxatron managed by a woman named Skye writes review on sci-fi movies and wrote a trigger warning before readers read any further.

    “TRIGGER WARNING for this film: This film contains explicit scenes of graphic sexual violence”
    Retrived from: http://planetjinxatron.com/girl-with-dragon-tattoo-yikes/
    The Kite runner
    Lisa Baldwin, an economist, wrote about how “The Kite Runner” should have trigger warnings for students as to how widely read it is, especially in middle school.

    “The rape scenes might trigger emotional, traumatic or painful memories and disturbing mental images for some of the students.”
    Retrived from: http://www.citizen-times.com/story/opinion/contributors/2015/05/15/regarding-parental-rights-kite-runner/27361449/
    John Warner
    In an article, John Warner discussed the importance of trigger warnings.
    “I would never advocate for mandatory trigger warnings on syllabi, or require all faculty to use them. If these demands are made by students, they should be heard in an effort to find a remedy to their complaints consistent with the values of the institution, but mandating faculty behavior in ways that conflict with academic freedoms is a non-starter.
    But I’m going to continue to give my students a ‘heads-up’ where it seems appropriate, and at times those will fit the definition of ‘trigger warning.’ “
    Retrived from: https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/just-visiting/why-and-how-one-instructor-uses-trigger-warnings
    Columbia University Letter on sexual assault by No Red Tape Columbia
    “Trigger warning: This letter contains material about sexual and dating violence.”
    Retrived from: http://web.law.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/microsites/gender-sexuality/nrt_prevention_letter.pdf
    Lisa Baldez
    Amanda Zhou, a student of Dartmouth, wrote an article entitled, “Faculty discuss trigger warnings and sensitive course material.” Below are direct quotations from her artivle.
    “Lisa Baldez, government and Latin American, Latino and Carribean studies professor, said that if she were to give a trigger warning every time difficult emotional material was discussed and student took the opportunity to leave her classroom, there would be almost nothing left to learn in her course.
    Baldez referenced a class she teaches on Latin American history and gender policies, which includes topics such as military dictatorship, violation of human rights and torture. However, before classes on especially difficult materials, Baldez said she tries to give the material context while acknowledging that these topics can and should very difficult and emotional to read about.”
    Retrived from: http://www.thedartmouth.com/article/2016/05/faculty-discuss-trigger-warnings-and-sensitive-course-material
    Lucas Hollister
    Taken from the article above, Zhou further gives examples of how professors give trigger warnings.
    “Hollister said that at the beginning of the term he gives a ‘pseudo-trigger warning,’ letting the class know that his syllabus tends to have ‘lot of material that might be difficult for people who don’t have an official medical condition.’”
    Retrived from: http://www.thedartmouth.com/article/2016/05/faculty-discuss-trigger-warnings-and-sensitive-course-material

  10. 2015-12534

    Examples of Trigger Warnings
    1. Hofstra University Unveils “Trigger Warning” For Tonight’s Debate

    • “Trigger warning: The event conducted just beyond this sign may contain triggering and/or sensitive material. Sexual violence, sexual assault, and abuse are some topics mentioned within this event. If you feel triggered, please know there are resources to help you.”

    Retrieved from: http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-09-26/hofstra-university-unveils-trigger-warning-ahead-tonights-debate

    The ultra-obscure no budget Canadian zombie film Corpse Eaters opens with the following disclaimer: (Note: This is a TV/Movie Trope Gimmick)

    • ANNOUNCER: Attention please: the motion picture you are about to see contains certain very stomach-upsetting scenes. The producers feel they have a moral obligation to warn each and every ticket buyer of this fact. Although most people have the ability to cope with the sudden nausea and shock, there are some people who cannot handle it. Test audiences, after watching this motion picture, suggested that a warning of some sort be included before each scene they found to be upsetting. Therefore, the producers have inserted a special warning buzzer and picture of a patron reacting to the scene. When you see the man turning green and the buzzer sounding, those of you who feel you cannot take it, please do not look at the screen. Here is what to look for: [cue shot of man gagging into handkerchief accompanied by the buzzer] It is your only warning of the scene coming up. Thank you for your co-operation.

    Retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HOmgjr7-IBs
    

    Eden Green (literature) begins with a warning that the novel contains everything from suicide attempts to spiders.

    • “This book… contains themes, implications, and/or graphic scenes of powerlessness, physical and verbal abuse, implied rape, self-harm, suicidal thoughts and attempts, drug use, contamination, body horror, brief violence and gore, mass death, eternal suffering, gun use, needles, and spiders.”

    Retrieved from: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Literature/EdenGreen

    Monash University has become the first in Australia to introduce a policy of trigger warnings

    In the Melbourne university’s pilot program, 15 course outlines contain warnings that the content could cause emotional distress to students. It involves academics reviewing the course’s content and highlight any ’emotionally confronting material’ related to sexual assault, violence, domestic abuse, child abuse, eating disorders, self-harm, suicide, pornography, abortion, kidnapping, hate speech, animal cruelty and animal deaths, including abbatoirs.
    • A university spokeswoman, who refused to be named, said the move was consistent with improving “the excellence of our teaching and learning underpinned by inclusive respect”. “As our curriculum and teaching methodologies increasingly become immersed with multimedia content and technologies, such an approach is becoming increasingly necessary. The warnings are becoming increasingly important as Monash strives to present the most appropriate and demanding course content, and also ensure our students are assessed on as broad a range of the curriculum content as possible.We are developing this approach with ongoing input from students and educators, ”she says.

    Retrieved from: http://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/monash-university-pilots-trigger-warnings-to-give-students-the-heads-up-on-potentially-offensive-material/news-story/bae3d9882cf54bff6fdb8b9a973ec763

    The course syllabus of Feminist Performance Art class taught by visiting dance professor Ariel Osterweis contains the following trigger/content warning:
    Please Note:
    • “Danger and safety are both integral to education. I invite you to break free from safe thinking: take risks. Try out ways of thinking that feel weird. Approach strange performances with curiosity. Don’t be afraid to sound stupid. Be brave. At the same time, I invite you to commit, with me, to making our classroom a safer space for us to take these risks. Listen to each other. Help each other think a little deeper or differently. Don’t be afraid to disagree with me or with your classmates, but do it with an attitude of respect. Be mindful of the power we have to inflict damage on others. Be aware of the structures of oppression (racism, cissexism, misogyny, homophobia, classism, and ableism) that can make learning environments unsafe for many. If you anticipate that some material might generate more than reasonably expected discomfort for you, let me know early in the term so we can work something out. In other words, as you embark on this class, I encourage you to be both brave and compassionate (Adapted from Professor Laura Horak of Carlton University).”

    Retrieved from: http://skidmorenews.com/new-blog/2015/10/22/trigger-or-content-warnings-in-academia

    After one particularly racist performance piece was shown, many students called the professor (Ariel Osterweis) out for not providing a trigger warning for that particular video, and some were angered at her for not inserting her opinion as a preface to the piece and agreeing that, yes, it was heinously racist. Two students expressed concern and contacted the professor.

    Ariel Osterweis responded immediately, writing:
    • “In doing my work, I have identified Ann Liv Young as an anti-racist artist who uses a strategy of deliberately offending her audience in a very self-conscious way. But she does so without revealing her knowledge of the subject at hand. In other words, as many of you astutely observed, she just may be always performing, even when she comes to speak to us in class. She allows us to feel disgust toward her as part of her strategy. It is our job as scholars to try to ascertain some of the strategies she calls upon and some of the socio-cultural issues she is identifying by using offensive spectacles as part of her strategy. As you may have noticed, she rarely mentions the fact that she is Native American (and only did so in an intentionally arbitrary way during her performance); I believe this is also a strategy of staging (white) privilege.
    Nevertheless, by no means would I ever attempt to defend her; it is entirely up to you to make an informed analysis of her work, work that leeches emotion from its viewer. Your reactions are valid and I validate them.
    I always strive to foster a safe environment amidst an ethic of intellectual risk-taking. Thus, material in my courses (especially this one) will be challenging on many levels, and will be differently challenging for different individuals. Each person has an individual threshold for what could be triggering.
    I respect you and want you to remember that you have agency here. Your education is your right and your responsibility, and I encourage you to take advantage of scanning the syllabus and/or Blackboard (or class discussion) for material that could be triggering for you and to come to me if you want to check ahead of time (even though I have been clear about content). In taking responsibility for your education, I encourage you to take the time to come speak with me anytime.”

    Retrieved from: http://skidmorenews.com/new-blog/2015/10/22/trigger-or-content-warnings-in-academia

    Mr. Andersen-Rodgers, an associate professor of government at California State University at Sacramento, says that many of his students either are veterans, some of whom battle post-traumatic stress disorder, or are from war-torn countries.

    • Mr. Andersen-Rodgers began putting what he calls a “word of caution” in the syllabus, which he points out on the first day. He talks about the powerful emotions some topics evoke, as well as telling students where on the campus they can seek help if the feelings overwhelm them.

    Retrieved from: http://www.chronicle.com/article/How-3-Professors-Use-Trigger/237691

    Kate Manne is an assistant professor of philosophy at Cornell University.
    • “To me, there seems to be very little reason not to give these warnings. As a professor, it merely requires my including one extra line in a routine email to the class, such as: ‘A quick heads-up. The reading for this week contains a graphic depiction of sexual assault.’ These warnings are not unlike the advisory notices given before films and TV shows; those who want to ignore them can do so without a second thought.”

    Retrieved from: https://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/20/opinion/sunday/why-i-use-trigger-warnings.html?mcubz=0

    Kelli Marshall, Instructor at DePaul University: I’m currently teaching a course on Spike Lee and Quentin Tarantino. While most students registering for Lee/Tarantino: Topics in Film Studies know they will encounter representations of drug-use, racist language, gunfire, and rape, I cannot assume every student knows this. As such, I’ve included the following paragraph in my syllabus:

    • “Works of Lee and Tarantino contain extreme profanity, nudity, depictions of sex, and hate-speech (i.e., language that may be interpreted as racist, homophobic, misogynistic, or sexist). Their works also include representations, sometimes graphic, of the following: drug use and needles, overdoses, car accidents, insects, vomit, blood, medical procedures, corpses, trauma to a pregnant character, forced captivity, premature burial, torture, gun violence, bullet wounds, physical combat, murder, sexual assault, and rape. Since virtually every work of Lee and Tarantino includes at least 5 of these, I will not disclose specific triggers before every screening. Rather, this section of the syllabus will function as a trigger warning for the entire term. Students who anticipate discomfort while screening these films should research the plot and potential triggers before class, and then sit near an exit so that, when necessary, they may step out of the room for a few minutes. Removing yourself for a moment or two is perfectly fine.”

    Retrieved from: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/372-trigger-warnings-quentin-tarantino-and-the-college-classroom

    [Anime and Manga] YTV’s former Bionix block had a variety of content warnings that were used for different anime:

    • “The following program is intended for an older youth audience. Viewer discretion is advised.” (Perhaps the rarest of the disclaimers, which only appeared at random on some episodes of Naruto.)
    • “The following program contains mature situations/themes and is intended for an older youth audience. Viewer discretion is advised.” (Used for Bleach, Eureka Seven, Mobile Suit Gundam SEED, InuYasha and Witch Hunter Robin, as well as some non-anime on the Bionix block such as Futurama.)
    • “The following program contains mature content, coarse language and is intended for an older youth audience. Viewer discretion is advised.” (Used before .hack//SIGN and some episodes of Naruto.)
    • “The following program contains scenes of violence and is intended for an older youth audience. Viewer discretion is advised.” (Used before Fullmetal Alchemist.)
    • “This program contains scenes of violence, coarse language and is intended for an older teen audience. Viewer discretion is advised.” (Notably contains a harsher-sounding music track then the “older youth” disclaimer. Used before Death Note, Detective Conan and Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex.)

    Retrieved from: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ContentWarnings

  11. Trigger Warning: Next meeting, we will be watching a clip in class that includes scenes of rape.

    Trigger Warning: Tomorrow, we will discuss a novel with depictions of sexual assault, vomiting, rape and sexual abuse.

    Trigger Warning: Before you read the material, please know that some of the examples cover
    detailed explanations of domestic violence.

    Trigger Warning: I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.

    Trigger Warning: Discussion will engage rationally with ideas, arguments and views they find difficult, upsetting, or even repulsive content will depict or discuss common causes of trauma, like military combat, child abuse, incest and sexual violence (Manne).

    Trigger Warning:.If you ever feel the need to step outside during one of the discussions, either for a short time or for the rest of the class session, you may always do so. However, you will be responsible for any discussions and requirements you miss.

    Trigger Warning: The film will be showing very explicit portrayals of sex and violence. You may step out of the room anytime.

    Trigger Warning: This course is about sexual violence. Note that you may have to do papers, and engage in recitations that will focus on rape and other forms of sexual abuse. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence.

    Trigger Warning: Before we discuss the homework, please know that we will discuss the testimonies and cover detailed explanations of child abuse and domestic violence from the material.

    Trigger Warning: I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address possible symptoms of depression. Self-harm and other forms of mental health issues representations may also be explored for next meeting’s discussion.

    *Edited Trigger warning examples
    Source:
    https://www.cccd.edu/employees/hr/equity/Documents/Inclusion/Inclusion_TriggerWarnings_Final_EIC_Accessible.pdf
    http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2014/05/29/essay-why-professor-adding-trigger-warning-his-syllabus

  12. 2015-01872 J101 WWX

    “In tomorrow’s lecture we will be looking at the origins of victimology in the 1940s. Our main task is to see their positivist approach and get a sense of the kind of victimological study they set in motion. But with the early victimologists there is sensitive content about victim-blaming in general, and we will look at an example of victim-blaming in the context of sexual assault.”
    “In one section of tomorrow’s lecture there will be some graphs and statistics on victimization through crime in Aotearoa/New Zealand, observing gender and ethnic differences in rates of victimization; and discussion of gender and race-ethnicity in relation to stereotypical depictions of crime, the criminal, and the victim. Forms of crime featured in the graphs include interpersonal violence.”
    SOURCE: Stringer, R. (2016). Trigger warnings in university teaching. Women’s Studies Journal, 30(2), 62-66. doi:1173-6615
    “A quick heads-up. The reading for this week contains a graphic depiction of sexual assault.”
    SOURCE: Manne, K. (2015, September 19). Why I Use Trigger Warnings. The New York Times. Retrieved August 21, 2017, from http://www.nytimes.com
    “Trigger Warning: This book contains scenes of colonialism, racism, and rape, which may be upsetting to students who have experienced colonialism, racism, or rape.” (On J.M. Coetzee’s “Disgrace”)
    SOURCE: Kang, J. (2014, May 21). Trigger Warnings and the Novelist’s Mind. The New Yorker. Retrieved August 21, 2017, from http://www.newyorker.com
    “Common Trigger Warnings
    Below you will find a list (in no particular order) of common trigger warnings. If discussing one of these things, it is considered common courtesy to put a simple “Trigger Warning: [Subject]” before a post.
    Please note: This is a work in progress. If there are any triggers you feel are missing, please feel free to drop us an ask.

    – Swearing
    – Rape
    – Abuse (physical, mental, emotional, verbal, sexual)
    – Child abuse/pedophilia
    – Self-injurious behavior (self-harm, eating disorders, etc.)
    – Talk of drug use (legal, illegal or psychiatric)
    – Suicide
    – Descriptions/pictures of medical procedures (even if they don’t contain blood or gore)
    – Descriptions/pictures of violence or warfare (including instruments of violence, such as knives or guns)
    – Corpses, skulls or skeletons
    – Needles
    – Discussions of -isms, shaming, or hatred of any kind (racism, classism, hatred of cultures/ethnicities that differ from your own, sexism, hatred of sexualities or genders that differ from your own, anti-multiple, non-vanilla shaming, sex positive shaming, fat shaming/body image shaming, neuroatypical shaming)
    – Any time slurs are used (this includes words like “stupid” or “dumb”, which are still widely considered to be socially acceptable)
    – Trans* degendering, or anti-trans* views of bodies
    – Dismissal of lived oppressions, marginalization, illness or differences
    – Kidnapping (forceful deprivation of/disregard for personal autonomy)
    – Discussions of sex (even consensual)
    – Death or dying
    – Spiders
    – Insects
    – Snakes
    – Vomit
    – Pregnancy/childbirth
    – Blood
    – Serious injury
    – Trypophobia (Link is safe.)
    – Scarification
    – Nazi paraphernalia
    – Slimy things
    – Anything that might inspire intrusive thoughts in people with OCD”
    SOURCE: Common Trigger Warnings [Web log post]. (n.d.). Retrieved August 21, 2017, from http://privilege101.tumblr.com
    5. “Would love your thoughts on this. Heads up, there’s a pretty graphic description of rape about a third of the way in.”
    SOURCE: Dawson, E. (2015, August 14). How I Use Trigger Warnings. Medium. Retrieved August 21, 2017, from http://www.medium.com
    6. “If they are feeling particularly vulnerable, illustrative bits of the site like personal accounts, might trigger young people into an action or remind them of a time when they were struggling.” (Chris Leaman on Young Minds website)
    7. “A trigger warning for a gender studies course at Stirling University says: ‘We cannot anticipate or exclude the possibility that you may encounter material which is triggering [ie, which can trigger a negative reaction] and we urge that you take all necessary precautions to look after yourself in and around the programme.’”
    SOURCE: Grant, G., & Harding, E. (2017, January 4). Bible students are warned… you may find the crucifixion too upsetting! The Daily Mail. Retrieved August 21, 2017, from http://www.dailymail.co.uk
    8. “Some contents of this course may involve media that may be triggering to some students due to descriptions of and/or scenes depicting acts of violence, acts of war, or sexual violence and its aftermath. If needed, please take care of yourself while watching/reading this material (leaving classroom to take a water/bathroom break, debriefing with a friend, contacting a Sexual Violence Support Coordinator at 614-292-1111, or Counseling and Consultation Services at 614-292-5766, and contacting the instructor if needed). Expectations are that we all will be respectful of our classmates while consuming this media and that we will create a safe space for each other. Failure to show respect to each other may result in dismissal from the class.” (From The Ohio State University website)
    9. “TW: hospitalization, suicidal ideation, self-harm, abuse, police, sexual assault, military, sexism, homophobia”
    SOURCE: Slade, M. (2016, November 7). Trigger Warnings – What They Are and What They Aren’t [Cartoon]. Retrieved August 21, 2017, from http://www.everydayfeminism.com
    10. “This course will explore the main themes, trends, and dilemmas in the history of the United States. In accord with our college’s new policy on trigger warnings, I have affixed a cautionary note to each week’s topic. If the topic threatens to provoke feelings of trauma or panic in you, please inform me beforehand and I will excuse you from class. I’m looking forward to learning together in a safe environment!”
    SOURCE: Zimmerman, J. (2014, May 20). My Syllabus, With Trigger Warnings [Web log post]. Retrieved August 21, 2017, from http://www.chronicle.com

  13. 2016-89023
    J 101 WWX
    1. A seminar that dealt with gender, sexuality, and disability which contained disturbing topics including sexual violence and child abuse.

    Trigger Warning: (On a professor’s syllabus) “retreat from ideas and perspectives at odds with their own”

    (Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/11/opinion/trigger-warnings-safe-spaces-and-free-speech-too.html?mcubz=0)

    When the website NPR Ed (npr.org) covered the fatal shooting of the shooting of an African-American resident of the Minneapolis area

    Trigger Warning: “We’ll embed the video here, with the warning that it contains images and language that viewers might find disturbing.”

    (Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/09/07/492979242/half-of-professors-in-npr-ed-survey-have-used-trigger-warnings)

    Professor Hasan Jeffries, an associate professor at Ohio State University teaches African-American and U.S. history, concerned that his students may have already experienced sexual assault or police violence wrote this.
    Trigger Warning: “This is hard history. It’s hard to talk about, hard to absorb. It’s filled with trauma, sexual violence, racial violence, visual images of murder and chaos. You may walk into my classroom and see an image of a lynching that was put on a postcard. This is America.”
    (Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/09/07/492979242/half-of-professors-in-npr-ed-survey-have-used-trigger-warnings)
    Ismail Muhammad, a professor at University of California, Berkeley does not fancy trigger warning until previewing a 1974 film entitled Chinatown for Film and Literature class and noticed a student who is Asian-American noticed that the student looked uncomfortable and hurt, preventing this pain the professor puts on his syllabus

    Trigger Warning: “Content Notice: This semester our objects of study deal with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry, and violence. As a result, this class will be a space to think deeply about explicit and, in some cases, disturbing texts … ”
    (Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    5. Meredith Loken, Ph.D and professor at University of Washington in Seattle. She teaches Sexual Violence, Justice and the law. In her syllabus she writes

    Trigger Warning: “This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence … ”

    (Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings

    Converted professor of trigger warnings, Steven Hammer of Saint Joshpeh’s University in Philadelphia. He teaches Advanced Web Audio & Video Production. Admitting that they will be watching intense scenes in class.

    Trigger Warning: “I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.”

    (Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings

    John Warner had students that are practicing Christians and assigned a book to read that killed their God by people in the opening story
    He said “I wanted to warn them that they may be offended and they should feel free to feel that offense. But once they were done being offended, I wanted them to try to experience the text on its own terms.”
    (Source: https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/just-visiting/why-and-how-one-instructor-uses-trigger-warnings)
    Oberlin College recommends a book entitled Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart is a great and important book

    Trigger Warning: … it may trigger readers who have experienced racism, colonialism, religious persecution, violence, suicide, and more.
    Students said the trigger warning should have been: “Trigger warning: This book contains a scene of suicide.”
    (Source: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/mar/05/trigger-warnings-can-be-counterproductive)

    “University of Melbourne’s Dr Lauren Rosewarne, who teaches about gender and sexuality, has been warning students about potentially disturbing content since she started teaching 13 years ago.”
    Trigger Warning: “The senior lecturer warns students about sexual assault, rape, suicide and transgenderism, but said she keeps the warnings to a minimum to avoid “baby[ing]” students.”

    (Source: http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/universities-pull-the-trigger-on-political-correctness-20160623-gpqeon.html)

    Victorian Student Representative Council vice-chair David Trevorrow said One alleged victim told a court that Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird had retraumatised her, while another said that studying the American classic made her feel uncomfortable in front of her classmates.
    Trigger Warning: “If students are discussing highly emotionally charged content they should be aware that it is distressing and they can go to the school counsellor,”
    (Source: http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/too-many-depressing-messages-in-vce-books-drives-push-for-trigger-warnings-20170427-gvtybq.html)

  14. 2015-03211
    J101 WWX
    1. Martha J. Reineke, a professor of religion at the University of Northern Iowa, says she agrees with the general sentiment of the Chicago letter. Years ago, she says, when administrators tried to force professors to use some form of trigger warnings, she objected and joined an effort to inscribe
    “We Are Here to Offend You”
    in Latin at the entrance of the university.
    2. Patrick J. Keenan, a professor of law at the University of Illinois, says he uses trigger warnings to help his students engage with ideas that have been ignored for far too long in his field. On the first day of class, he mentions how hard it is to learn the horrific details of those crimes. He tells students that if there is a day when the material is especially troubling to them, they can sit quietly and just listen.
    “I wouldn’t invite someone to my house and say we’re going to watch Finding Nemo and then show them a snuff film,” Mr. Keenan says.
    Source: http://www.chronicle.com/article/How-3-Professors-Use-Trigger/237691
    3. Gaby Dunn, a writer and early adopter of Tumblr and LiveJournal, said when she was using LiveJournal around 2001, fan fiction communities warned one another of explicit content but seldom used the phrase that has been adopted today. “When we’d write fan fiction on LiveJournal, we might say, ‘This includes a rape storyline,’ or something.
    4. Feministe officially introduced trigger warnings in 2008, “based on feedback from commenters,” said Filipovic. “We obliged to users’ demands because we did not want to alienate any readers.” But some posts prior to 2008 warned of disturbing content. A post titled “Would You Rather” from February 2006, for example, read: “(Note: contains some sexual-violence triggers).” Another post from July 2007 warned: “this video is potentially triggering.”
    5. A few months after Breslin’s piece in 2010, Jessica Coen took over Jezebel, a highly trafficked website that writes about gender but does not deem itself “feminist.” The site had never used trigger warnings in the past, and Coen said there was never a discussion about whether or not to introduce them. “As a human being you’re responsible for what media you engage with. If a Jezebel headline says ‘harrowing,’ or ‘terrible,’ or ‘horrible,’ that’s a pretty good indicator that the content will be difficult,” Coen said. “That’s the web standard. If you start warning for one thing, you have to decide which unpleasant thing is worth a trigger and which isn’t. That isn’t a position an editor should be in.”
    Source: https://www.buzzfeed.com/alisonvingiano/how-the-trigger-warning-took-over-the-internet?utm_term=.qmeMvX9YJA#.yqqoVBgE46
    6. A blog post on MS Magazine, which discusses about trigger warnings opens with a trigger warning: “Discusses trauma, suicide, sexual assault, child abuse.”
    Source: http://msmagazine.com/blog/2014/05/29/the-trigger-warning-debate-ignores-survivors-voices/
    7. Facebook is now showing warnings before allowing users to view potentially disturbing video. The new change began in December, however many noticed it for the first time when people began sharing footage from the Charlie Hebda shooting of the police officer. Facebook will now show the graphic video warning and require users to click before the video will play. They will also disable auto-play for these videos. “Warning – Graphic Video. Videos that contain graphic content can shock, offend, and upset. Are you sure you want to see this?’’
    Source: http://www.thesempost.com/facebook-turn-autoplay-show-warnings-graphic-videos/
    8. Journalist Jessica W. Luther posted this tweet in her Twitter account, @scATX: “[TRIGGER WARNING rape] Is there anyone who specifically studies the phenomenon of gang rapes? Someone specific I should read on this topic?”
    Source: http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2014/05/07/trigger_warnings_on_twitter_don_t_make_sense.html
    9. A draft trigger warning policy from Oberlin College, quoted in Inside Higher Education, used Achebe’s acclaimed text as an example of a work which might require a warning, saying the novel was “a triumph of literature that everyone in the world should read. However, it may trigger readers who have experienced racism, colonialism, religious persecution, violence, suicide, and more.”
    10. “For instance, one trigger warning for The Great Gatsby might be: (TW: “suicide,” “domestic abuse” and “graphic violence”),” he wrote. “Professors can also dissect a narrative’s passage, warning their students which sections or volumes of a book possess triggering material and which are safer to read. This allows students to tackle passages that are not triggering but return to triggering passages when they are fully comfortable.”
    Source: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/may/19/us-students-request-trigger-warnings-in-literature

  15. 2014-89397

    The following episode contains scenes that some viewers may find disturbing and/or may not be suitable for younger audiences, including graphic depictions of rape and sexual assault. Viewer discretion is advised – Netflix
    (Source for #1: (https://www.google.com.ph/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjk5JethezVAhWHJZQKHTuPCaAQjRwIBw&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.buzzfeed.com%2Fkrystieyandoli%2Fnetflix-is-updating-its-trigger-warnings-for-13-reasons-why&psig=AFQjCNFJ2mjW78gdQ50n264RujG4P0h_Gw&ust=1503532538625884)
    “The content of this course will include topics that are difficult for some people to confront or discuss.”
    “In this course, we will deal with sensitive material about controversial topics, and we may encounter adult content.”
    “This course addresses sensitive content such as rape, violence, and abortion that may be difficult for some people to address.”
    “Video clips with war scenes from Germany, Russia, China, and Japan.” –Southeast Community College (Nebraska)
    If there is a topic you are unable to discuss, please notify the professor so we can make alternative arrangements.” –University of Maryland at College Park
    “…sensitivity has become a more important criterion than intellectual challenge…if a number of students say you’re insensitive, the administration dings you.” –University of California at Berkeley
    (Source from #2 to #6: Lukianoff, Greg and Haidt, “The Coddling of the American Mind.” The Atlantic Sept., 2015.; Alternative URL: https://www.palmbeachstate.edu/ptlc/documents/20161201-TriggerWarnings.pdf)
    “Next week, we will be watching a film in class that includes scenes of military combat.”
    “In week five, we will read a novel that contains graphic depictions of sexual assault. Please make a note so that you are prepared to encounter those sections when you read.”
    “I found an article about the kinds of personal barriers community college students sometimes face. Before you read it, please know that some of the examples cover detailed explanations of child abuse.”
    (Source for #7 to #9: https://www.cccd.edu/employees/hr/title9/Documents/Inclusion_TriggerWarnings_Final_EIC_Accessible.pdf)
    “The class covers a wide range of perspectives on the world… You are therefore certain to encounter ideas that conflict with your values and worldview. Indeed, the art that we look at will sometimes contain messages about identity, religion, science, ethics, justice, equality, and other topics that contemporary people find naive or offensive.” –College Art Association
    (Source for #10: http://ncac.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/NCAC-TriggerWarningReport.pdf)

  16. 2016-89101

    Content Warnings:
    “Warning: this comic occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors).” –Standard content warnings on xkcd comic pages
    Retrieved from: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ContentWarnings

    “This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence… “-Meredith Loken, doctoral student at the University of Washington

    “I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.” -Steven Hammer, assistant professor of communication and digital media, Saint Joseph’s University

    Retrieved from: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings

    Students from the University of Chicago were given a warning on their sylabus for the subject matters they were about to discuss in class

    “The reading for this week includes a graphic description of sexual assault,” “This course deals with sensitive material that may be difficult for some students.”
    “Retreat from ideas and perspectives at odds with their own,”

    Retrieved from: https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/11/opinion/trigger-warnings-safe-spaces-and-free-speech-too.html?mcubz=0)

    A professor of sociology lectures on the statistics of abortion. A student leaves the class. She later told the professor that she wouldn’t be able to participate in class discussions concerning abortionHe allowed the student to leave the classroom when she needed to. The professor later added a trigger warning, with the addendum:
    “If there is a topic you are unable to discuss, please notify the professor so we can make alternative arrangements.”

    “In this course, we will deal with sensitive material about controversial topics, and we may encounter adult content.”

    “This course addresses sensitive content such as rape, violence, and abortion that may be difficult for some people to address.”

    Retrieved from: https://www.palmbeachstate.edu/ptlc/documents/20161201-TriggerWarnings.pdf

    The Movie And Television Review And Classification Board (MTRCB)
    “Ang programang ito ay Rated SPG. Maaaring may maseselang tema, lenggwahe, karahasan, sekswal, horror, o droga na hindi angkop sa mga bata.” Or “This program is rated SPG. It contains scenes with themes, language, violence, sex, horror, or drugs which may not be suitable for children. Strong Parental Guidance is advised.”

    Retrieved from: http://zenhonbuph.net/2012/02/mtrcb-implement-spg-rating-starting-february-09/

    The Time places a trigger warning before showing graphical images about Pres. Rodrigo Duterte’s Drug War
    “Warning: Some of the following images are graphic in nature and might be disturbing to some viewers”

    Retrieved from: http://time.com/philippines-rodrigo-duterte-drug-war-local-photographers/

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