Sec. FWX, Media Monitor, 7th, here

     Sec. FWX, Media Monitor, 7th, here

     Section FWX class members may post the 7th media monitor here with deadline on the usual Thursday 5pm (Oct. 11). A bonus topic can be picked from any of the 14 titles earlier provided

(image credits: U.P. archives, used here non-commercially for academic purposes)

7 thoughts on “Sec. FWX, Media Monitor, 7th, here

  1. BONUS: Drug War

    Among the multitude of chilling abominations being sanctioned by the Duterte Regime, the seeming sacrificial victimisation of innocents tops the list. Clearly (or not, in the eyes of the masses) this “collateral damage” is tantamount to grave crimes against the Filipino people, with its consequences set to resound for years to come.
    The article of Jodesz Gavilan shines light on this gargantuan monster of a problem, that the government severely plays down into “isolated cases.”

    As is with most societal ills, the bureaucracy enables a modern-day slaughter of the innocents- police operations left and right see children and teenagers murdered without cause to show for. It is most ironic that what should be the very protectors of citizens are those who make life living hell for the same people.

    Much has been said of the rampancy of vigilante-style killings in the 20 years of the Duterte dynasty lording over Davao City. It is said to be the cause of the false sense of order that can be felt in the said city. These killings have crept on over to Metropolitan Manila- with its primary victims being the least, the last and the lost. The same illusion of false order cannot be attained in such a big scale, thus the end-product of a metropolis in chaos.

    Painfully, this is completely enabled by the citizens themselves- who unfathomably allow themselves to be the meat after a slaughter.

    Article: https://www.rappler.com/newsbreak/iq/179234-minors-college-students-victims-war-on-drugs-duterte

  2. 7Th Media Monitor
    BONUS: DRUG WAR

    In an article of Inquirer.net, it was reported that two drug suspects were killed in two separate buy-bust operations in Batangas City. The article immediately provided the source of its information when Batangas’ police director was mentioned for the basis of the report. This follows the provision in the SPJ Code of Ethics to “identify sources clearly” for the public to judge the reliability of the sources. The killed men were also referred to as ‘drug suspects’ since they were not put into trial and therefore, innocent until proven guilty. This follows the provision in the Philippine Press Code of Ethics that states journalists should “presume persons accused of crime of being innocent until proven otherwise.”

    SOURCE:
    https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1037208/2-dead-in-batangas-buy-bust-operations

  3. 7th Media Monitor
    Bonus:Recent Surge in the Prices of Food Items

    This media coverage by ABS-CBN as well as the “lens” that I plan to apply to it falls more in line with the provision of the SPJ Code of Ethics, specifically those that fall under the first provision.

    This report by ABS-CBN has diligently provided a quick summary of the events leading up to the commenting of Joey Salceda on the current plans of the government vis-a-vis the surge of the prices in local retail and food items. Hence, it did not merely oversimplify this local issue-phenomenon and did not hastily summarized it as context was provided.
    Similarly, this “build up” of news produced by ABS-CBN in the topic of inflation satisfies the provision of the SPJ Code of Ethics which mandates that information about the “life of a news story” ought to be collected and disseminated to keep the public posted on what is happening and is about to happen.
    Furthermore, the source or subject of the news content is identified to a clear extent, inasmuch as the details such as name and political position of the latter were disclosed — hence, the public can freely judge his “credibility” and “motivations.”
    By giving voice to a persona who holds opposing sentiments in the current rhetoric of the political landscape, ABS-CBN satisfied the provision that journalists ought to serve as watchdogs of the government while keeping the powers in balance.

    Sources: “Economic ‘tokhang’: Duterte, Arroyo aides clash over agri SRP” (2018, October 10). Retrieved on October 10, 2018, from https://news.abs-cbn.com/focus/10/10/18/economic-tokhang-duterte-arroyo-aides-clash-over-agri-srp

  4. 7th Media Monitor
    Regular: Duterte ‘secret special report’ bares drug links of active, ex-PNP, PDEA, BoC execs

    In an article dated October 10, the Philippine Daily Inquirer reported that President Duterte has gotten hold of a “secret special report” that identifies and implicates officials of the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA), the Philippine National Police and the Bureau of Customs in the ongoing drug war. The aforementioned report is to be released to the media on Tuesday, October 16.

    The report mentions former PDEA deputy director general for administration Ismael Fajardo, Jr. to have active involvement in the drug trade. Throughout his government career, he has been involved in numerous drug operations and staged drug raids. He also lives a questionably lavish lifestyle that cannot be supported by his current income.

    Former PNP official Senior Supt. Eduardo Acierto has been involved with the procurement of military weapons that were given to the NPA, extortion of foreigners, and recycling drugs seized in drug raids. Lastly, Bureau of Customs intelligence officer Jimmy Guban is said to be a go-to guy for smuggled commodities.

    This article does not abide by the Society of Journalists’ Code of Ethics provision that states that journalists should identify sources clearly. Even though President Duterte ordered the release of the report, this source is still dubious especially considering the current administration’s lack of integrity when it comes to disseminating information. I believe this news article should have been written when the report was made public so as to provide its readers sufficient information before they make judgments.

    Sources:
    Esguerra, Darryl John and Nestor Corrales. “Duterte ‘secret special report’ bares drug links of active, ex-PNP, PDEA, BoC execs.” inquirer.net, 10 October 2018, https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1041294/duterte-secret-special-report-bares-drug-links-of-active-ex-pnp-pdea-boc-execs.

    “SPJ Code of Ethics.” SPJ, 9 Sept. 2014, http://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp.

  5. 7th Media Monitor
    BONUS: DRUG WAR

    In an article dated October 10, the Philippine Daily Inquirer reported that President Duterte has gotten hold of a “secret special report” that identifies and implicates officials of the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA), the Philippine National Police and the Bureau of Customs in the ongoing drug war. The aforementioned report is to be released to the media on Tuesday, October 16.

    The report mentions former PDEA deputy director general for administration Ismael Fajardo, Jr. to have active involvement in the drug trade. Throughout his government career, he has been involved in numerous drug operations and staged drug raids. He also lives a questionably lavish lifestyle that cannot be supported by his current income.

    Former PNP official Senior Supt. Eduardo Acierto has been involved with the procurement of military weapons that were given to the NPA, extortion of foreigners, and recycling drugs seized in drug raids. Lastly, Bureau of Customs intelligence officer Jimmy Guban is said to be a go-to guy for smuggled commodities.

    This article does not abide by the Society of Journalists’ Code of Ethics provision that states that journalists should identify sources clearly. Even though President Duterte ordered the release of the report, this source is still dubious especially considering the current administration’s lack of integrity when it comes to disseminating information. I believe this news article should have been written when the report was made public so as to provide its readers sufficient information before they make judgments.

    Sources:
    Esguerra, Darryl John and Nestor Corrales. “Duterte ‘secret special report’ bares drug links of active, ex-PNP, PDEA, BoC execs.” inquirer.net, 10 October 2018, https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1041294/duterte-secret-special-report-bares-drug-links-of-active-ex-pnp-pdea-boc-execs.

    “SPJ Code of Ethics.” SPJ, 9 Sept. 2014, http://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp.

  6. 7th Media Monitor
    BONUS: Report on Surveys

    Just this past weekend, a survey conducted by the Social Weather Survey (SWS) has been released, affirming that “[almost] half of Filipinos believe that President Rodrigo Duterte has health problems”. The survey results were then reported by the Philippine Daily Inquirer last Sunday, October 7, 2018, with the article’s headline as directly stated above. At surface level, the news report relatively followed the Associated Press (AP) Stylebook and Philippine Press Institute’s (PPI) provisions about reporting polls and surveys for its general disclosure of the survey’s questions, methodology, and results. However, interestingly enough, the fact stated in the headline clashed with another headline from an article published by Rappler about the same survey, which was entitled “61% of Filipinos believe Duterte’s health a public matter – SWS”.

    The difference in main topic might seem simple but, in a way, also says a lot. The Inquirer article was only inclusive of the results about the public’s opinion on whether the President has health problems or not (their headline), and whether they are personally worried about these allegations (secondary topic of the article).

    Additionally, the Inquirer article merely provided the statistics, not the context of the issue, which is a very important factor in order to avoid “misunderstanding, misinterpretation, and misuse” in part of the reader. The Rappler article, in comparison, seemed much more comprehensive and illuminating about the issue, even going so far as providing a detailed background about the growing public concern for Duterte’s health and its current significance to the state of the nation. One would appreciate how this news story was made not purely out of the survey results.

    At the very least, Rappler was able to clear SWS from baseless accusations of being “biased” by writing that “[the] survey items…‘were non-commissioned’ and ‘were included on SWS’s own initiative and released as a public service’.”

    Sources:
    Associated Press. Associated Press Stylebook 2018.

    Philippine Press Institute. Code of Professional and Ethical Conduct of the Philippine Press Institute in Covering Elections.

    Gonzalez, Mia. (7 October 2018). : “61% of Filipinos believe Duterte’s health a public matter – SWS”. Retrieved from: https://www.rappler.com/nation/213705-filipinos-duterte-health-sws-survey-september-2018

    Ramos, Christia Marie. (7 October 2018). : “45% of Filipinos believe Duterte has health problems — SWS”. Retrieved from: https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1039891/45-of-filipinos-believe-duterte-has-health-problems-sws

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