Sec.FWX Media Monitor, 8th, here

Sec. FWX, Media Monitor, 8th, here
     For Section FWX: The 8th Media Monitor of Section FWX can be posted here with the usual deadline on Thursday 5pm (Oct. 18); bonuses still apply from the list of 14 topics (provided that no topic may be repeated by the same class member).

     Happy weekend everyone!
(Image credits: Photo from the U.P. archives, used here non-commercially for academic purposes)

9 thoughts on “Sec.FWX Media Monitor, 8th, here

  1. 8th Media Monitor

    Bonus Title: Hate Speech

    Article: Fake News and Hate Speech
    SPJ Code of Ethics: Never deliberately distort facts or context, including visual information. Clearly label illustrations and reenactments.

    This piece,(written by Florangel Rosario Braid for the Manila Bulletin) zeroes in on the innate relationship of the international phenomena of fake news to the widespread usage of hate speech. The advent of easily accessible communication via social media has turned the world in to an unprecedented tide of power wrought through these means. It notes that fake news has existed for some time now, but the means of its spreading has worsened due to heavy usage of Facebook.

    On the other hand, it challenges all exposed to possible sources of fake news to critically think. It is most imperative to be able to discern what is truth from what is false; the attainment of which can only happen through an elevation of the human mind.

    Purveyors of fake news are usually the same individuals who utilise the same medium to spread hate speech which usually lifts one individual up to the unfair detriment of another. The article notes that “hate speech creates the “us” and the “them”, and fosters a climate of prejudice and intolerance.” While these are supposedly prohibited on the medium, the wide scope of the application makes legislation difficult to full implement.

    Source: https://news.mb.com.ph/2017/04/18/fake-news-and-hate-speech/

  2. 8th Media Monitor

    Bonus Title: Hate Speech

    Article: Fake News and Hate Speech
    SPJ Code of Ethics: Never deliberately distort facts or context, including visual information. Clearly label illustrations and reenactments.

    This piece,(written by Florangel Rosario Braid for the Manila Bulletin) zeroes in on the innate relationship of the international phenomena of fake news to the widespread usage of hate speech. The advent of easily accessible communication via social media has turned the world in to an unprecedented tide of power wrought through these means. It notes that fake news has existed for some time now, but the means of its spreading has worsened due to heavy usage of Facebook.

    On the other hand, it challenges all exposed to possible sources of fake news to critically think. It is most imperative to be able to discern what is truth from what is false; the attainment of which can only happen through an elevation of the human mind.

    Purveyors of fake news are usually the same individuals who utilise the same medium to spread hate speech which usually lifts one individual up to the unfair detriment of another. The article notes that “hate speech creates the “us” and the “them”, and fosters a climate of prejudice and intolerance.” While these are supposedly prohibited on the medium, the wide scope of the application makes legislation difficult to fully implement.

    Source: https://news.mb.com.ph/2017/04/18/fake-news-and-hate-speech/

  3. 8th Media Monitor

    Bonus Title: Hate Speech

    Article: Fake News and Hate Speech
    SPJ Code of Ethics: Never deliberately distort facts or context, including visual information. Clearly label illustrations and reenactments.

    This piece,(written by Florangel Rosario Braid for the Manila Bulletin) zeroes in on the innate relationship of the international phenomena of fake news to the widespread usage of hate speech. The advent of easily accessible communication via social media has turned the world in to an unprecedented tide of power wrought through these means. It notes that fake news has existed for some time now, but the means of its spreading has worsened due to heavy usage of Facebook.

    On the other hand, it challenges all exposed to possible sources of fake news to critically think. It is most imperative to be able to discern what is truth from what is false; the attainment of which can only happen through an elevation of the human mind.

    Purveyors of fake news are usually the same individuals who utilise the same medium to spread hate speech which usually lifts one individual up to the unfair detriment of another. The article notes that “hate speech creates the “us” and the “them”, and fosters a climate of prejudice and intolerance.” While these are supposedly prohibited on the medium, the wide scope of the application makes legislation difficult to full implement.

    Source: https://news.mb.com.ph/2017/04/18/fake-news-and-hate-speech/

  4. The Philippine Press Code of Ethics, in one point, posits that care shall be taken by journalists as to not suppress truth and facts, while the SPJ Code of Ethics has a provision mandating the act of providing context. This article by Rappler satisfies both provisions as a description of the identity of Ninoy Aquino is presented. Similarly, the article included the majority of the words presented by President Duterte and therefore did not put the possibility of taking him out of context. Similarly, links to content that further disclose what transpired-occurred during the Marcos era and the Ninoy Aquino timeline were present in the media coverage. Furthermore, a picture of the statement of President Duterte as released through the Malacañang Palace is present so as to give further proof and context.

    Sources: SPJ Code of Ethics, Philippine Press Institute: The Philippine Journalist’s Code of Ethics.
    Ranada, P. (2018, August 21). Duterte calls on gov’t officials, citizens to emulate Ninoy Aquino. Retrieved on October 18, 2018, from https://www.philstar.com/headlines/2018/09/17/1852284/president-declares-september-21-day-remembrance

  5. 8th Media Monitor
    Regular: “’Bakit mag-aadmit sa hindi ginawa?’ Imee Marcos denies atrocities during martial law”

    Last Tuesday, October 16, Imee Marcos had officially proclaimed a Senate bid and filed a certificate of candidacy, which of course had also stirred an uproar from both protesters and the press. One article from ABS-CBN News that covered the event in particular took special interest in the happenstance that “Marcos… filed her certificate of candidacy next to Chel Diokno, the son of martial law victim Jose ‘Pepe’ Diokno.” Because of this, the author may already be accused by some to be “biased”. However, despite the article being clear in its stance and/or awareness of the Marcoses’ “atrocities during martial law”, it still managed to be a fair and balanced story because of its effort to get comments or reactions from Imee, the person in question.

    Asked about Chel Diokno, the current Ilocos Norte Governor affirms to the public that she had no prior knowledge of the founding dean of the De La Salle University College of Law or even his late kin.

    The article soon redirected towards her reaction about the possibility that she might work in the Senate with Bam Aquino (given the dated conflict between their families). She then even goes far as saying: “The country, especially the new generation, is ready to hear the Marcos family’s side of the story.”

    Imee Marcos – while blatantly whitewashing our national history which was so clearly dark during the time of her father Ferdinand Marcos’ dictatorship – was still entitled with the ethical treatment (taken from the PPI Expanded Code of Ethics) of being “[accorded] equal prominence to rejoinders, rebuttals, and clarification” as the criticized news subject, regardless of whether she deserved such common decency or not. Ultimately, it was a missed opportunity, perhaps on the part of the writer, that she was not able to milk the story enough and get sources (e.g. Chel Diokno, Bam Aquino, protesters at the venue) aside from Imee; thus, ending up with a news article that just focuses on her absurd yet constant denial.

    Sources:
    Domingo, Katrina. (16 October 2018). : “’Bakit mag-aadmit sa hindi ginawa?’ Imee Marcos denies atrocities during martial law”. Retrieved from: https://news.abs-cbn.com/news/10/16/18/bakit-mag-aadmit-sa-hindi-ginawa-imee-marcos-denies-atrocities-during-martial-law

    Philippine Press Institute. Code of Professional and Ethical Conduct of the Philippine Press Institute in Covering Elections.

  6. 8th Media Monitor
    Bonus: Drug War

    On October 13, 2018, Rappler reported that according to Malacanang, the country’s reelection to the United Nations Human Rights Council symbolizes that the “government respects human rights and does not tolerate abuse by those in authority.” Palace Spokesperson Salvador Panela asserted that the Philippines is one of the key players in the world’s war on drugs. He also claimed that that the country’s re-election signifies that the international community agrees that the war on drugs is essential in preserving human life and liberty.

    The Society of Professional Journalists’ Code of Ethics posits that journalists should “provide access to source material when it is relevant and appropriate.” This article abides such provision because it clearly states the source of information, and describes what the UNHRC is. The article also provides quotes from the source of information.

    Sources:
    Rivas, Ralf. “PH says seat at U.N. rights body validates drug war.” rappler.com, 13 October 2018, https://www.rappler.com/nation/214239-united-nations-human-rights-council-seat-validates-duterte-drug-war.

    “SPJ Code of Ethics.” SPJ, 9 Sept. 2014, http://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp.

  7. 8th Media Monitor
    REGULAR: Source says Duterte fired Mocha but Palace insists she resigned

    On October 8, 2018, the Philippine Daily Inquirer reported that according to an anonymous source, (former) Communications Assistant Secretary Mocha Uson was fired. The article is an example of a badly written one since 1) it didn’t identify sources clearly. It didn’t even describe its source as someone credible and believable (merely as “A source privy to the information”) and so, the article looks like it is just basing its news on rumors. The SPJ Code of Ethics says we sould “identify the sources clearly. The public is entitled to as much information as possible to judge the reliability and motivations of sources.”

    Also, the Inquirer ran a story which hasn’t been confirmed yet. Inquirer appears to be just riding the wave since prior to this, there was much buzz around Mocha’s resignation and so news like this will garner much attention from the public.

    Sources:
    SPJ Code of Ethics
    Corrales, Nestor. (2018, October 8). Source says Duterte fired Mocha but Palace insists she resigned. Retrieved from https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1040193/duterte-fired-mocha-source.

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