2nd Section Trigger Warnings Media Law (optional, 10pts)

2nd Section Trigger Warnings Media Law (optional, 10 pts)

(to hear the free streaming music embedded for this post, pls click “Listen in browser”, then the play button, on the soundcloud pod below: if on mobile device)

(Photo, i-phoneshot by Myra Lambino a month ago; facial expression direction by J, age: 12)

Members of the Second Section, Media Law class, may post the results of their assignment here, 3griffith

 in the comments box, for ten points. Pls use your pseudonym as shown in your gravatar, or your nickname, or your student number. As stated in the instructions: Pls give examples of the trigger warnings, not generic descriptions; put them in quotes. Tnx.

26 thoughts on “2nd Section Trigger Warnings Media Law (optional, 10pts)

  1. COMM120
    TRIGGER WARNINGS
    1. “Our discussion will probably touch on the sexual assault that is depicted in the second last chapter of The White Hotel. This content is disturbing, so I encourage you to prepare yourself emotionally beforehand. If you believe that you will find the discussion traumatizing, you may choose to not participate in the discussion or to leave the classroom. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so if you leave the room for a significant time, please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.”
    2. “The following reading includes a discussion of the harsh treatment experienced by the First Nations children in residential schools in the 19502. This content is disturbing, so I encourage everyone to prepare themselves emotionally before proceeding. If you believe that the reading will be traumatizing for you, the you may choose to forgo it. You will still, however, be responsible for the material that you miss, so please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.”
    3. “Content Notice: This semester our objects of study deal with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry, and violence as a result. This class will be a space to think deeply about explicit and, in some cases, disturbing texts.” (University of California, graduate teaching assistant Ismail Muhammad)
    4. “This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence.” (University of Washington graduate teaching assistant Meredith Loken)
    5. “I will assign and ash that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.” (Saint Joseph’s University communication studies professor Steven Hammer)
    6. “Course Content Note: At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you ever feel the need to step outside during one of these discussions, either for a short time or for the rest of the class session, you may always do so without academic penalty. (You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually.) If you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to this material, either with the class or with me afterwards, I welcome such discussion as an appropriate part of our coursework.”
    7. “Trigger warning: If you suffer from social anxiety and are terrified at the prospect of giving a speech in front of strangers, this episode may bring you out in hives.”
    8. “Trigger warning: Skip this if you really can’t stand spiders, knives or haunted-house horrors.”
    9. “Trigger warning: The resolution of this episode is likely to divide the internet like no other; trolls may even take it as a form of justification. If you’ve ever found yourself on the receiving end of 4Chan abuse, or Reddit vigilantism, maybe skip it.”
    10. “Trigger warning: Avoid if you’re allergic to the 1980s. Otherwise this is a must-see — and the most gentle, warm introduction to Black Mirror yet.”
    Sources:
    Johnston, A. (2014). Essay on why a professor is adding a trigger warning to his syllabus | Inside Higher Ed. [online] Insidehighered.com. Available at: https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2014/05/29/essay-why-professor-adding-trigger-warning-his-syllabus [Accessed 21 Aug. 2017].
    Owens, E. (2016). Trigger Warnings In Actual College Courses Are As Dumb As You Imagine. [online] The Daily Caller. Available at: http://dailycaller.com/2016/09/27/trigger-warnings-in-actual-college-courses-are-as-dumb-as-you-imagine-only-more-so/ [Accessed 21 Aug. 2017].

    Smith, I. (2016). Content Notice: Here Are A Few Ways Professors Use Trigger Warnings. [online] NPR.org. Available at: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings [Accessed 21 Aug. 2017].

    Taylor, C. (2016). ‘Black Mirror’ is back, and your nightmares will never be the same. [online] Mashable. Available at: http://mashable.com/2016/10/21/black-mirror-season-3-review/#s.1iize_PaqH [Accessed 21 Aug. 2017].

    Centre for Teaching Excellence. (2017). Trigger Warnings | Centre for Teaching Excellence. [online] Available at: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger [Accessed 21 Aug. 2017].

  2. 2015 – 09568 1.University of Waterloo on sexual issues

    “Next class our discussion will probably touch on the sexual assault that is depicted in the second last chapter of The White Hotel. This content is disturbing, so I encourage you to prepare yourself emotionally beforehand. If you believe that you will find the discussion to be traumatizing, you may choose to not participate in the discussion or to leave the classroom. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so if you leave the room for a significant time, please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.”

    Retrieved from : https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger

    2.University of Glasgow on religion

    “According to university documents, a lecture on Jesus and cinema sometimes ‘contains graphic scenes of the crucifixion, and this is flagged up to students beforehand’.

    Retrieved from : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4089302/Bible-students-warned-crucifixion-upsetting-Critics-say-trigger-warnings-distressing-content-creating-generation-snowflake-students.html

    3.Gabriel Moshenka of University College London on Psychology

    “Meanwhile archeology students at University College London were reportedly told last month they could leave the lecture without being penalised if they find it too “distressing”, with lecturer Gabriel Moshenka claiming it was a necessary measure as the material might induce psychological trauma.”

    Retrieved from : http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/trigger-warnings-universities-students-us-uk-a7353061.html

    4.Stirling University on archaeology

    “Archaeology students at Stirling University are issued with a ‘warning in advance of one image in a PowerPoint, which is of a well-preserved archaeological body from an archaeological context’ because of the ‘risk it is found a bit gruesome’.

    Retrived from : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4089302/Bible-students-warned-crucifixion-upsetting-Critics-say-trigger-warnings-distressing-content-creating-generation-snowflake-students.html#ixzz4qMglho

    5.Ismail Muhammad of University of Washington on certain issues

    “Content notice: this semester our objects with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry and violence. As a result, this class will be a space to think explicitly and in some cases disturbing texts..”

    Retrieved from : http://dailycaller.com/2016/09/27/trigger-warnings-in-actual-college-courses-are-as-dumb-as-you-imagine-only-more-so/

    6.Goldsmiths university on certain toics

    “ Goldsmiths university advises undergraduates studying youth cultures that they can “take time out” in classes that examine the sensitive subject matter, warning the course examines issues that “might be sensitive for some” including underage sex, self-harm, drug use, homelessness, Aids, “queer lifestyles” and religion.”

    Retrieved from : http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/trigger-warnings-universities-students-us-uk-a7353061.html

    Trigger warning activist giving examples of some book classics

    “The New York Times reports that activists want many classics to have trigger warnings in effect printed on them like health advisories on cigarette packages. “The Merchant of Venice,” for instance, would need the label “contains anti-Semitism.” Virginia Woolf’s “Mrs. Dalloway” would need a warning that it discusses suicide. Oberlin’s memo advised faculty that Chinua Achebe’s “Things Fall Apart,” may “trigger readers who have experienced racism, colonialism, religious persecution, violence, suicide and more.”

    Retrieved from : http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-goldberg-trigger-warnings-20140520-column.html

    8.Meredith Loken of the University of Washington sexuality

    “This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse and your are expected to complete assignments regarding these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony and description of sexual violence..”

    Retrieved from : http://dailycaller.com/2016/09/27/trigger-warnings-in-actual-college-courses-are-as-dumb-as-you-imagine-only-more-so/

    9.Newcastle University on sexual assault warns and give students an option

    “The option was given to not attend the lectures, or subsidiary film screenings and seminars, due to distressing content regarding rape and sexual assault.”

    Retrieved from : http://thecourieronline.co.uk/2016/12/05/trigger-warnings-issued-over-sensitive-lecture-content/

    10.Stathclyde University on crime

    “Students of forensic science at Strathclyde University in Glasgow are given a ‘verbal warning… at the beginning of some lectures where sensitive images, involving blood patterns, crime scenes and bodies etc are in the presentation’.

    Retrived from: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4089302/Bible-students-warned-crucifixion-upsetting-Critics-say-trigger-warnings-distressing-content-creating-generation-snowflake-students.html#ixzz4qMoNE

  3. 2013-43345
    Comm 120
    1. “The following materials provide information regarding the University’s response to and adjudication of sexual misconduct cases. Some of the information provided uses explicit language and references situations about sexual situations, sexual assault, and sexual violence. These materials may be upsetting.” by Brandeis University
    Retrieved from: http://www.brandeis.edu/provost/pdf/final_title_IX_resources-_april_22-2015.pdf
    2. “I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.” By Steven Hammer, assistant professor of communication and digital media, Saint Joseph’s University
    Retrieved from: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    3. “Warning: this comic occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors).” by Standard content warnings on xkcd comic pages
    Retrieved from: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ContentWarnings
    4. “CAVEAT: Bringing about Armageddon can be dangerous. Do not attempt it in your own home.” — Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman, Good Omens
    Retrieved from: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/DontTryThisAtHome
    5. “The preceding program contained scenes of extreme violence and should not have been viewed by young children.” —The Simpsons, “Deep Space Homer”
    Retrieved from: http://allthetropes.wikia.com/wiki/Content_Warnings
    6. The Spitting Image parody of Margaret Thatcher’s memoirs bore a sticker on the front that said “WARNING! This book carries a salacious warning on the front that is an OBSCENE attempt to sell more copies”.
    Retrieved from: http://allthetropes.wikia.com/wiki/Content_Warnings
    7. From the Gantz box set: “R18+: Strong animated violence, Strong animated sex scenes, High level theme, Strong coarse language.”
    Retrieved from: http://allthetropes.wikia.com/wiki/Content_Warnings
    8. The English version of the Black Lagoon manga has the following content warning:
    “Black Lagoon is rated M for Mature and is recommended for mature readers. This volume contains graphic violence, strong language, nudity, adult situations, drinkin’, smokin’, ass-kickin’, law breakin’, gun-love, running with scissors and just about everything your mother ever told you not to do.”
    Retrieved from: http://allthetropes.wikia.com/wiki/Content_Warnings
    9. Chapter 14 of Land Before Time: Revenge has this warning: “Warning: THIS SCENE CONTAINS SOME INTENSE VIOLENCE!”
    Retrieved from: http://allthetropes.wikia.com/wiki/Content_Warnings
    10. James Whale’s 1931 Frankenstein begins with a “friendly warning” by actor Edward Van Sloan that is classic.
    “We are about to unfold the story of Frankenstein, a man of science who sought to create a man after his own image without reckoning upon God. It is one of the strangest tales ever told. It deals with the two great mysteries of creation — life and death. I think it will thrill you. It may shock you. It might even…horrify you. So if any of you feel that you do not care to subject your nerves to such a strain, now’s your chance to…uh, well, we warned you.”
    Retrieved from: http://allthetropes.wikia.com/wiki/Content_Warnings

  4. 2014-29751
    1. “If at any point you must leave the class, please do so quietly. Several of the readings could be triggers, and I want you to feel safe in the class at all times.” (Colleen Clemens, associate professor of non-Western literatures, Kutztown University Pennsylvania)
    Retrieved from: https://www.tolerance.org/magazine/why-i-support-trigger-warnings

    “This is hard history. It’s hard to talk about, hard to absorb. It’s filled with trauma, sexual violence, racial violence, visual images of murder and chaos. You may walk into my classroom and see an image of a lynching that was put on a postcard. This is America.”
    (Hasan Jeffries, associate professor of history, Ohio State University)
    Retrieved from: http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/09/07/492979242/half-of-professors-in-npr-ed-survey-have-used-trigger-warnings
    “I have been giving a trigger warning on the first day of class every semester. This is it: This is going to be a difficult class,”
    (John McIntyre, adjunct professor, Loyola University Maryland)
    Retrieved from: https://www.facebook.com/baltimoresun/videos/10154522831964712/
    Our course readings and classroom discussions will often focus on mature, difficult, and potentially challenging topics. As with any course in the Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies Program, course topics are often political and personal. Readings and discussions might trigger strong feelings—anger, discomfort, anxiety, confusion, excitement, humor, and even boredom. Some of us will have emotional responses to the readings; some of us will have emotional responses to our peers’ understanding of the readings; all of us should feel responsible for creating a space that is both intellectually rigorous and respectful. Above all, be respectful (even when you strongly disagree) and be mindful of the ways that our identities position us in the classroom.
    (Julie Beaulieu, Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies Lecturer, University of Pittsburgh)
    Retrieved from: http://www.gsws.pitt.edu/resources/suggested-syllabus-statement-content-warning-and-class-climate
    “This is a class that deals with representations of women in popular culture. Some of the texts we will look at in this class contain explicit images of sexuality and/or violence against women. You need to be aware of that going into the class. I presume that you are all adults in both the legal sense as well as in terms of how you comport yourself in class discussions. However, if anyone in the class is under 18 years old, please see me to make arrangements for some possible assignments. In addition, if anyone is likely to have unpleasant emotional reactions to potentially graphic or violent depictions of anything, please come see me privately, and I will be happy to give you a warning about which texts in particular might be problematic. I will also gladly arrange for an alternative assignment if necessary.”
    (Elizabeth Guzik, Women’s Studies 365 instructor, California State University)
    Retrieved from: http://web.csulb.edu/~eguzik/365/content.html
    “I can’t predict what material may trigger someone suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder or what will upset people for other reasons. If you are concerned or uncertain about this course, please closely review the course materials and decide whether you want to continue taking it.”
    (Julie A. Winterich, associate professor of sociology and the director of women’s, gender and sexuality studies, Guilford College)
    Retrieved from: https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2015/10/09/middle-ground-trigger-warnings-essay
    “This course deals with emotionally sensitive material. If you have suffered a major loss recently, you may wish to take this course at a later time. Please note that Temple University’s Tuttleman Counseling Services provides counseling services for students. Also, they offer grief/bereavement support groups.
    (Nyasha Junior, Department of Religion, Temple University)
    Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/NyashaJunior/status/776569505866801152
    Some of the material we will be covering this semester is of a charged nature— whether in terms of form, content or politics. As critics, we cannot shy away from this material; however, we must understand that this material may generate a wide variety of reactions and opinions among our colleagues in the classroom. Thus, it is imperative that we remain aware of, and sympathetic to the reactions and opinions of our classmates. Respect and sensitivity will produce a stronger learning environment and generate better, more nuanced discussions.
    (Ryan J. Cox, PhD, English and Film Instructor, Keyano College)
    Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/RyanJCoxPhD/status/776507304267042816
    Because we may at times read depictions of various forms of violence including but not limited to sexual, domestic, and militaristic— some of the material in this course may be triggering to students. If you find yourself triggered by this or other material, take care of yourself and feel free to remove yourself and/or speak to me or those in Shippensburg’s Counseling Center.
    (Jordan Windholz, Shippensburg University)
    Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/jwindholz/status/776487054062551040
    In this course, assigned readings will often contain content that some readers may find to be upsetting or triggering, including but not limited to discussions of violence, sexual violence, racism, ableism, discrimination, illness, self-harm, and medical trauma. Work by your classmates may also contain sensitive material. This content warning is intended to allow students to engage with the material in whichever way is most productive and healthy for them. Any student should feel free to contact me to discuss this further, or to request more specific content / trigger warnings for readings.
    (Cadee Leebron, Ohio State University)
    Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/CadeyLadey/status/776574975679598596

  5. 2014-01880

    1) “Content Notice: This semester our objects of study deal with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry, and violence. As a result, this class will be a space to think deeply about explicit and, in some cases, disturbing texts … ”
    — Ismail Muhammad, graduate student instructor at University of California, Berkeley

    Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings

    2) “This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence … ”
    — Meredith Loken, doctoral student at the University of Washington

    Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings

    3) “I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.”
    — Steven Hammer, assistant professor of communication and digital media, Saint Joseph’s University

    Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings

    4) “At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you ever feel the need to step outside during one of these discussions, either for a short time or for the rest of the class session, you may always do so without academic penalty. (You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually.)

    If you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to this material, either with the class or with me afterwards, I welcome such discussion as an appropriate part of our coursework.”
    – Angus Johnston, a historian and advocate of American student organizing

    Source: https://studentactivism.net/2015/08/25/trigger-warnings-for-syllabi-a-how-to-one-year-along/

    5) “At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you suspect that specific material is likely to be emotionally challenging for you, I’d be happy to discuss any concerns you may have before the subject comes up in class. Likewise, if you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to course material with the class or with me individually afterwards, I welcome such discussions as an appropriate part of our classwork.

    If you ever feel the need to step outside during a class discussion you may always do so without academic penalty. You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually to discuss the situation.”
    – Angus Johnston, a historian and advocate of American student organizing

    Source: https://studentactivism.net/2015/08/25/trigger-warnings-for-syllabi-a-how-to-one-year-along/

    6) “The following materials provide information regarding the University’s response to and adjudication of sexual misconduct cases. Some of the information provided uses explicit language and references situations about sexual situations, sexual assault, and sexual violence. These materials may be upsetting”
    – Brandeis University

    Source: http://www.brandeis.edu/provost/pdf/final_title_IX_resources-_april_22-2015.pdf

    7) “This course deals with emotionally sensitive material. If you have suffered a major loss recently, you may wish to take this course at a later time. Please note the Temple University’s Tuttleman Counseling Services provides counseling services for its students. Also, they offer grief/bereavement support groups.”
    – Nyasha Junior; Death & Dying

    Source: https://twitter.com/NyashaJunior/status/776569505866801152

    8) “In this course, assigned readings will often contain content that some readers may find to be upsetting or triggering, including but not limited to discussions of violence, sexual violence, racism, ableism, discrimination, illness, self-harm, and medical trauma. Work by your classmates may also contain sensitive material. This content warning is intended to allow students to engage in the material in whichever way is the most productive and healthy for them. Any student should feel free to discuss this further, or to request for more specific content/trigger warnings for readings.”
    – Cade Leebron

    Source: https://twitter.com/CadeyLadey/status/776574975679598596

    9) “This is hard history. It’s hard to talk about, hard to absorb. It’s filled with trauma, sexual violence, racial violence, visual images of murder and chaos. You may walk into my classroom and see an image of a lynching that was put on a postcard. This is America.”
    – Hasan Jeffries, an associate professor of history at Ohio State University

    Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/09/07/492979242/half-of-professors-in-npr-ed-survey-have-used-trigger-warnings

    10) “I can’t predict what material may trigger someone suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder or what will upset people for other reasons. If you are concerned or uncertain about this course, please closely review the course materials and decide whether you want to continue taking it.”
    – Julie A. Winterich

    Source: https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2015/10/09/middle-ground-trigger-warnings-essay

  6. 2014-21849
    COMM 120

    “Works of Lee and Tarantino contain extreme profanity, nudity, depictions of sex, and hate-speech (i.e., language that may be interpreted as racist, homophobic, misogynistic, or sexist). Their works also include representations, sometimes graphic of the following: drug use and needles, overdoses, car accidents, insects, vomit, blood, medical procedures, corpses, trauma to a pregnant character, forced captivity, premature burial, torture, gun violence, bullet wounds, physical combat, murder, sexual assault, and rape. Since virtually every work of Lee and Tarantino includes at least 5 of these, Ii will not disclose specific triggers before every screening. Rather, this section of the syllabus will function as a trigger warning for the entire term. Students who anticipate discomfort while screening these films should research the plot and potential triggers before class, and then sit near an exit so that, when necessary, they may step out of the room for a few minutes. Removing yourself for a moment or two is perfectly fine.”
    (Kelli Marshall, teacher of media and cinema-studies in the College of Communications at DePaul University) (https://chroniclevitae.com/news/372-trigger-warnings-quentin-tarantino-and-the-college-classroom)
    “This course will explore ideas and events that may be shocking, distressing, or offensive to some students. Images and accounts of war atrocities, weapons testing, and violations of human rights are part of this curriculum. In exploring these matters, the instructor aims to foster students’ ability to analyze, critique, and synthesize information in thorough and objective ways as do professional historians.”
    (by an unnamed professor on a course on Cold War History) (https://ctfd.sfsu.edu/content/trigger-warnings-college-classroom)
    “The cartoons you are about to see are products of their time. They may depict some of the ethnic and racial prejudices that were commonplace in the U.S society. These depictions were wrong then and they are wrong today. While the following does not represent the Warner Bros. view of today’s society, these cartoons are being presented as they were originally created, because to do otherwise would be the same as claiming that these prejudices never existed.”
    (Opening of Looney Toons by Warner Brothers) (http://obsidianwings.blogs.com/obsidian_wings/2014/05/trigger-warnings-are-the-opposite-of-censorship.html)
    “TRIGGER WARNING This article or section, or pages it links to, contains information about sexual assault and/or violence which may be triggering to survivors.” (article quoting from an unnamed source) (http://shortversion.com/newsfeed/2015/9/15/trigger-warnings)
    “TRIGGER WARNING: This content deals with an account of self-harm and may trigger some people.” (Rappler on their #AskMargie: Cutting YouTube video) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2VSF1gGNZQ)
    “If at any point you must leave the class, please do so quietly. Several of the readings could be triggers, and I want you to feel safe in the class at all times.” (Kutztown University director of Women’s Gender Studies Colleen Lutz Clemens) (http://www.phillymag.com/news/2016/08/29/in-defense-of-trigger-warnings/)
    “Trigger warning: This post deals with child abuse and may be triggering for some readers.” (Mamamia News article number 3 on an English couple charged with the murder of their 11-month-old son) (http://www.mamamia.com.au/knox-grammar-arrest-warrant/)
    “Trigger warning: This post deals with sexual abuse and murder and may be triggering for some readers.” (Mamamia News article number 6 on a 12-year-old girl’s body found in Australian man’s home in the Philippines) (http://www.mamamia.com.au/knox-grammar-arrest-warrant/)
    “Trigger Warning: This post contains detailed information about sexual assault that some readers may find disturbing.” (TeenVogue on an article about what to do after you’ve been sexually assaulted) (http://www.teenvogue.com/story/sexual-assault-help)
    “Trigger warning: The following slides contains sensitive subject matter.” (Refinery 29 on a slideshow of TV shows that got sexual consent right and wrong) (http://www.refinery29.com/2016/01/101533/television-series-sexual-consent)

  7. Trigger Warning 120

    “We are learning about the process of political reporting itself. And with that we will be discussing divergent viewpoints — some of which may not support your own views. Respect and tolerance are crucial as we talk about issues, ideas, bias and facts” (University of Florida. Political Reporting, Instructor Andrea Billups).
    Source: https://www.jou.ufl.edu/assets/syllabi/201708/Political%20Reporting%20Syllabus%20Fall%202017%20UF.pdf
    “He has a sarcastic sense of humor but wants you to benefit greatly from this course. He dislikes people gabbing in class when he’s talking and is really bothered by people walking in late” (University of Florida, Photographic Journalism, Prof. John Freeman).
    Source: https://www.jou.ufl.edu/assets/syllabi/201708/JOU3601-syl-fall-2017.pdf
    “We will discuss issues of gender, race, religion and class that are complex, sensitive and often personal. Be prepared to join actively in analyzing course material, discussion subjects and your own views and prejudices” (University of Florida, Journalism Studies, Instructor Steve Waters).
    Source: https://www.jou.ufl.edu/assets/syllabi/201706/2017-Summer_JOU4008-Journalism_Studies-Syllabus.pdf
    “There is a possibility you may experience personal discomfort, however, every student will be afforded the freedom to discuss their thoughts and ideas and to ask difficult questions about complex topics” (University of Florida, Legal and Ethic in Nursing, Instructor Bethart Snider).
    Source: http://nursing.ufl.edu/students-2/course-outlines/
    “Content Notice: This semester our objects of study deal with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry, and violence. As a result, this class will be a space to think deeply about explicit and, in some cases, disturbing texts … “(University of California, Instructor Ismail Muhammad).
    Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    ”This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence … ” (University of Washington, Meredith Loken).
    Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    “I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you” (St. Joseph’s University, Asst. Prof. Steven Hammer).
    Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    “Our classroom provides an open space for the critical and civil exchange of ideas. Some readings and other content in this course will include topics that some students may find offensive and/or traumatizing. I’ll aim to forewarn students about potentially disturbing content and I ask all students to help to create an atmosphere of mutual respect and sensitivity.”
    Source: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger
    “Next class our discussion will probably touch on the sexual assault that is depicted in the second last chapter of The White Hotel. This content is disturbing, so I encourage you to prepare yourself emotionally beforehand. If you believe that you will find the discussion to be traumatizing, you may choose to not participate in the discussion or to leave the classroom. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so if you leave the room for a significant time, please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.”
    Source: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger
    The following reading includes a discussion of the harsh treatment experienced by First Nations children in residential schools in the 1950s. This content is disturbing, so I encourage everyone to prepare themselves emotionally before proceeding. If you believe that the reading will be traumatizing for you, then you may choose to forgo it. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.
    Source: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger

  8. 2014-21004
    1. “We are learning about the process of political reporting itself. And with that we will be discussing divergent viewpoints — some of which may not support your own views. Respect and tolerance are crucial as we talk about issues, ideas, bias and facts” (University of Florida. Political Reporting, Instructor Andrea Billups).
    Source: https://www.jou.ufl.edu/assets/syllabi/201708/Political%20Reporting%20Syllabus%20Fall%202017%20UF.pdf

    “He has a sarcastic sense of humor but wants you to benefit greatly from this course. He dislikes people gabbing in class when he’s talking and is really bothered by people walking in late” (University of Florida, Photographic Journalism, Prof. John Freeman).
    Source: https://www.jou.ufl.edu/assets/syllabi/201708/JOU3601-syl-fall-2017.pdf
    “We will discuss issues of gender, race, religion and class that are complex, sensitive and often personal. Be prepared to join actively in analyzing course material, discussion subjects and your own views and prejudices” (University of Florida, Journalism Studies, Instructor Steve Waters).
    Source: https://www.jou.ufl.edu/assets/syllabi/201706/2017-Summer_JOU4008-Journalism_Studies-Syllabus.pdf
    “There is a possibility you may experience personal discomfort, however, every student will be afforded the freedom to discuss their thoughts and ideas and to ask difficult questions about complex topics” (University of Florida, Legal and Ethic in Nursing, Instructor Bethart Snider).
    Source: http://nursing.ufl.edu/students-2/course-outlines/
    “Content Notice: This semester our objects of study deal with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry, and violence. As a result, this class will be a space to think deeply about explicit and, in some cases, disturbing texts … “(University of California, Instructor Ismail Muhammad).
    Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    ”This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence … ” (University of Washington, Meredith Loken).
    Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    “I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you” (St. Joseph’s University, Asst. Prof. Steven Hammer).
    Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    “Our classroom provides an open space for the critical and civil exchange of ideas. Some readings and other content in this course will include topics that some students may find offensive and/or traumatizing. I’ll aim to forewarn students about potentially disturbing content and I ask all students to help to create an atmosphere of mutual respect and sensitivity.”
    Source: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger
    “Next class our discussion will probably touch on the sexual assault that is depicted in the second last chapter of The White Hotel. This content is disturbing, so I encourage you to prepare yourself emotionally beforehand. If you believe that you will find the discussion to be traumatizing, you may choose to not participate in the discussion or to leave the classroom. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so if you leave the room for a significant time, please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.”
    Source: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger
    The following reading includes a discussion of the harsh treatment experienced by First Nations children in residential schools in the 1950s. This content is disturbing, so I encourage everyone to prepare themselves emotionally before proceeding. If you believe that the reading will be traumatizing for you, then you may choose to forgo it. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.
    Source: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger

  9. 1.
    “This course will explore ideas and events that may be shocking, distressing, or offensive to some students. Images and accounts of war atrocities, weapons testing, and violations of human rights are part of this curriculum. In exploring these matters, the instructor aims to foster students’ ability to analyze, critique, and synthesize information in thorough and objective ways as do professional historians.”
    Retrieved from: https://ctfd.sfsu.edu/content/trigger-warnings-college-classroom

    2.
    “Course Content Note
    At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you suspect that specific material is likely to be emotionally challenging for you, I’d be happy to discuss any concerns you may have before the subject comes up in class. Likewise, if you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to course material with the class or with me individually afterwards, I welcome such discussions as an appropriate part of our classwork.
    If you ever feel the need to step outside during a class discussion you may always do so without academic penalty. You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually to discuss the situation.”
    Retrieved from: https://studentactivism.net/2015/08/25/trigger-warnings-for-syllabi-a-how-to-one-year-along/

    3.
    “This course will explore the main themes, trends, and dilemmas in the history of the United States. In accord with our college’s new policy on trigger warnings, I have affixed a cautionary note to each week’s topic. If the topic threatens to provoke feelings of trauma or panic in you, please inform me beforehand and I will excuse you from class. I’m looking forward to learning together in a safe environment!”
    Retrieved from: http://www.chronicle.com/blogs/conversation/2014/05/20/my-syllabus-with-trigger-warnings/

    4.
    “Next week, we will be watching a film in class that includes scenes of military combat.”
    5.
    “In week five, we will read a novel that contains graphic depictions of sexual assault. Please make a note so that you are prepared to encounter those sections when you read.”
    6.
    “I found an article about the kinds of personal barriers community college students sometimes face. Before you read it, please know that some of the examples cover detailed explanations of child abuse.”
    (4-6) Retrieved from: https://www.cccd.edu/employees/hr/equity/Documents/Inclusion/Inclusion_TriggerWarnings_Final_EIC_Accessible.pdf

    7.
    “Works of Lee and Tarantino contain extreme profanity, nudity, depictions of sex, and hate-speech (i.e., language that may be interpreted as racist, homophobic, misogynistic, or sexist). Their works also include representations, sometimes graphic, of the following: drug use and needles, overdoses, car accidents, insects, vomit, blood, medical procedures, corpses, trauma to a pregnant character, forced captivity, premature burial, torture, gun violence, bullet wounds, physical combat, murder, sexual assault, and rape. Since virtually every work of Lee and Tarantino includes at least 5 of these, I will not disclose specific triggers before every screening. Rather, this section of the syllabus will function as a trigger warning for the entire term. Students who anticipate discomfort while screening these films should research the plot and potential triggers before class, and then sit near an exit so that, when necessary, they may step out of the room for a few minutes. Removing yourself for a moment or two is perfectly fine.”
    Retrieved from: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/372-trigger-warnings-quentin-tarantino-and-the-college-classroom

    8.
    “NOTA BENE: readings covered in this course may be considered challenging due to topics that some may find offensive and/or traumatizing. Our classroom provides an open space for the critical and civil exchange of ideas. The instructor always tries to forewarn students about potentially disturbing subjects and requests all students aim to create an atmosphere of mutual respect and sensitivity.”
    9.
    “Some of the material we will cover in this class is quite graphic in its portrayal of suicide, suicidal thoughts, hopelessness, sexual behavior and the harmful behaviors associated with depression, schizophrenia and substance abuse. Please consider whether detailed descriptions and in-depth discussion of any of these topics will be difficult for you because you, a friend or a family member suffers from these disorders. For most people with psychological disorders, reading these books functions as an affirmation that helps you feel understood. However, for others, it may trigger problem behaviors. I just ask that you give this some thought. If you expect that this will be particularly difficult for you, I will give you priority registration for the class in a future semester. If the material has a psychological impact on you that you did not expect, you are always invited to talk to me or someone at the College Counseling Center (Location, XXX/XXX-XXXX.)”
    (8-9) Retrieved from: https://blogs.stockton.edu/genderbasedviolence/tag/trigger-warning/

    10.
    “Course Content Note
    At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you ever feel the need to step outside during one of these discussions, either for a short time or for the rest of the class session, you may always do so without academic penalty. (You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually.)
    If you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to this material, either with the class or with me afterwards, I welcome such discussion as an appropriate part of our coursework.”
    Retrieved from: https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2014/05/29/essay-why-professor-adding-trigger-warning-his-syllabus

  10. 2014-54639

    “Our classroom provides an open space for the critical and civil exchange of ideas. Some readings and other content in this course will include topics that some students may find offensive and/or traumatizing. I’ll aim to forewarn students about potentially disturbing content and I ask all students to help to create an atmosphere of mutual respect and sensitivity.”
    “Next class our discussion will probably touch on the sexual assault that is depicted in the second last chapter of The White Hotel. This content is disturbing, so I encourage you to prepare yourself emotionally beforehand. If you believe that you will find the discussion to be traumatizing, you may choose to not participate in the discussion or to leave the classroom. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so if you leave the room for a significant time, please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.”
    “The following reading includes a discussion of the harsh treatment experienced by First Nations children in residential schools in the 1950s. This content is disturbing, so I encourage everyone to prepare themselves emotionally before proceeding. If you believe that the reading will be traumatizing for you, then you may choose to forgo it. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.”

    Source:
    Trigger warnings. (n.d.). In uwaterloo.ca. Retrieved August 23, 2017 from https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger

    “At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you suspect that specific material is likely to be emotionally challenging for you, I’d be happy to discuss any concerns you may have before the subject comes up in class. Likewise, if you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to course material with the class or with me individually afterwards, I welcome such discussions as an appropriate part of our classwork. If you ever feel the need to step outside during a class discussion you may always do so without academic penalty. You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually to discuss the situation.”

    Source:
    Syllabus trigger warnings. (2015). In Student Activism. Retrieved August 23, 2017 from https://studentactivism.net/2015/08/25/trigger-warnings-for-syllabi-a-how-to-one-year-along/

    “Content notice: This semester our objects of study deal with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry, and violences. As a result, this class will be a space to think deeply about explicit and, in some cases, disturbing texts…”
    “The course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual
    violence…”
    “I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender equity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.”

    Source:
    Owens, E. (2016). Trigger warnings in actual college courses are as dumb as you imagine, only more so. In Dailycaller.com. Retrieved August 23, 2017 from http://dailycaller.com/2016/09/27/trigger-warnings-in-actual-college-courses-are-as-dumb-as-you-imagine-only-more-so/

    “This post comes with a trigger warning. Discussing a hate group and their leader, I had to chronicle what they’ve done. For those of you who come to my blog seeking writing advice, short fiction, and memoir entries, an article on Fred Phelps might seem off topic. I’ve met the man on two occasions, and as a commentator on trolls, cyber bullies, and internet culture, I felt compelled to weigh in.”

    Source:
    Khan, A. (2014). [TW: child abuse] Cry of the Tiger Cub. In jaythenerdkid.wordpress.com. Retrieved August 23, 2017 from https://jaythenerdkid.wordpress.com/2014/03/13/tw-child-abuse-cry-of-the-tiger-cub/

    “TW: Discussion of ableist language & bullying”

    Source:
    The case against stupid. (2016). In ischemgeek.wordpress.com. Retrieved August 23, 2017 from https://ischemgeek.wordpress.com/2014/02/15/the-case-against-stupid/

    “(TW): a note to readers that the material following the warning may trigger a post-traumatic stress reaction.”

    Source:
    Filipovic, J. (2014). We’ve gone too far with “trigger warnings”. In The Guardian. Retrieved August 23, 2017 from https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/mar/05/trigger-warnings-can-be-counterproductive

  11. Deceased Persons
    “WARNING: “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that the following program may contain images and voices of deceased persons”.
    Source: Trigger Warning. (n.d.). Retrieved August 23, 2017, from http://geekfeminism.wikia.com/wiki/Trigger_warning
    Historical Events
    “At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you suspect that specific material is likely to be emotionally challenging for you, I’d be happy to discuss any concerns you may have before the subject comes up in class. Likewise, if you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to course material with the class or with me individually afterwards, I welcome such discussions as an appropriate part of our classwork. If you ever feel the need to step outside during a class discussion you may always do so without academic penalty. You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually to discuss the situation.”
    Source: Jongston, A. (2016, August 26). Syllabus Trigger Warnings: A How-To, And Some Reflections, One Year Along. Retrieved August 23, 2017, from https://studentactivism.net/2015/08/25/trigger-warnings-for-syllabi-a-how-to-one-year-along/
    Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality, and Violence
    “Content notice: This semester our objects of study deal with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry, and violence. As a result, this class will be a space to think deeply about explicit and, in some cases, disturbing texts…”
    Source: Owens, E. (2016, September 27). Trigger Warnings In Actual College Courses Are As Dumb As You Imagine. Retrieved August 23, 2017, from http://dailycaller.com/2016/09/27/trigger-warnings-in-actual-college-courses-are-as-dumb-as-you-imagine-only-more-so/
    Sexual Violence
    “This course is abut sexual violence. We will be disc using rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence.”
    Source: Owens, E. (2016, September 27). Trigger Warnings In Actual College Courses Are As Dumb As You Imagine. Retrieved August 23, 2017, from http://dailycaller.com/2016/09/27/trigger-warnings-in-actual-college-courses-are-as-dumb-as-you-imagine-only-more-so/
    Strong Language, Race and Gender Inequity, Sexuality, and Violence
    “I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.”
    Source: Owens, E. (2016, September 27). Trigger Warnings In Actual College Courses Are As Dumb As You Imagine. Retrieved August 23, 2017, from http://dailycaller.com/2016/09/27/trigger-warnings-in-actual-college-courses-are-as-dumb-as-you-imagine-only-more-so/
    General Warnings
    “Our classroom provides an open space for the critical and civil exchange of ideas. Some readings and other content in this course will include topics that some students may find offensive and/or traumatizing. I’ll aim to forewarn students about potentially disturbing content and I ask all students to help to create an atmosphere of mutual respect and sensitivity.”
    Source: Trigger Warnings. (2016, November 10). Retrieved August 23, 2017, from https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger
    Sexual Assault
    “Next class our discussion will probably touch on the sexual assault that is depicted in the second last chapter of The White Hotel. This content is disturbing, so I encourage you to prepare yourself emotionally beforehand. If you believe that you will find the discussion to be traumatizing, you may choose to not participate in the discussion or to leave the classroom. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so if you leave the room for a significant time, please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.”
    Source: Trigger Warnings. (2016, November 10). Retrieved August 23, 2017, from https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger
    Historical Events
    “The following reading includes a discussion of the harsh treatment experienced by First Nations children in residential schools in the 1950s. This content is disturbing, so I encourage everyone to prepare themselves emotionally before proceeding. If you believe that the reading will be traumatizing for you, then you may choose to forgo it. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.”
    Source: Trigger Warnings. (2016, November 10). Retrieved August 23, 2017, from https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger
    On Hate Groups and Its Leaders
    “This post comes with a trigger warning. Discussing a hate group and their leader, I had to chronicle what they’ve done. For those of you who come to my blog seeking writing advice, short fiction, and memoir entries, an article on Fred Phelps might seem off topic. I’ve met the man on two occasions, and as a commentator on trolls, cyber bullies, and internet culture, I felt compelled to weigh in.”
    Source: A Note on Trigger Warnings. (2014, April 11). Retrieved August 23, 2017, from https://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/04/02/trigger-warnings/
    Sexual Assualt/ Sexual Harassment
    Written: “TW: sexual assault; sexual harassment.”
    Verbal: “I would like to trigger warn that I am about to go into a detailed discussion about an experience of sexual assault. Please feel free to leave at any time throughout this discussion if you wish.”
    Source: Trigger Warning Policy. (2016, December 23). Retrieved August 23, 2017, from https://nowsa2017.com/trigger-warning-policy-2/

  12. “Todd Berliner, a film-studies professor at the University of North Carolina, told Heat Street that he started using trigger warnings after he showed the film Festen, a dark movie about a family gathering, and a student approached him after saying he or she wished there had been a warning because he/she had been molested as a child.”
    [Retrieved from http://www.nationalreview.com/article/441212/professor-university-placed-trigger-warning-movie-clueless%5D
    “’Trigger warning,’ it reads in large letters. ‘The event conducted just beyond this sign may contain triggering and/or offensive material. Sexual violence, sexual assault, and abuse are some topics mentioned at this event.’ It then listed on- and off-campus resources for anyone who might ‘feel triggered’ as a result of what they saw.”
    [Retrieved from https://www.vox.com/2015/9/10/9298577/trigger-warnings-college%5D
    “This spring, I was in a seminar that dealt with gender, sexuality and disability. Some of the course reading touched on disturbing subjects, including sexual violence and child abuse. The instructor told us that we could reach out to her if we had difficulty with the class materials, and that she’d do everything she could to make it easier for us to participate. She included a statement to this effect on the syllabus and repeated it briefly at the beginning of each class. Nobody sought to ‘retreat from ideas and perspectives at odds with their own,’ as Dean Ellison put it in the letter, nor did these measures hinder discussion or disagreement, both of which were abundant.”
    [Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/11/opinion/trigger-warnings-safe-spaces-and-free-speech-too.html?mcubz=1%5D
    “Academics at universities including Edinburgh, the London School of Economics (LSE), Goldsmiths, Stirling and Central Lancashire are warning students of material they think could be ‘disturbing,’ giving them the option of leaving the lecture room if they decide to. The warnings have been issued ahead of lectures on topics including Christianity, popular culture, history, forensic science, photography, politics and law.”
    [Retrieved from http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/trigger-warnings-universities-students-us-uk-a7353061.html%5D
    “Goldsmiths university advises undergraduates studying youth cultures that they can ‘take time out’ in classes that examine the sensitive subject matter, warning the course examines issues that ‘might be sensitive for some’ including underage sex, self-harm, drug use, homelessness, Aids, ‘queer lifestyles’ and religion.”
    [Retrieved from http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/trigger-warnings-universities-students-us-uk-a7353061.html%5D
    “In May it was revealed undergraduate law students at Oxford University were being issued with trigger warnings before lectures containing material deemed too ‘distressing,’ a move that prompted a wave of criticism. At the time, law lecturer Laura Hoyano insisted those who wish to study law ‘have to deal with things that are difficult,’ telling Mail Online: ‘We can’t remove sexual offences from the criminal law syllabus – obviously.’”
    [Retrieved from http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/trigger-warnings-universities-students-us-uk-a7353061.html%5D
    “Oberlin College’s original policy (since tabled to allow for further debate in the face of faculty opposition) is an example of the range of possible trigger topics: ‘racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism, cissexism, ableism, and other issues of privilege and oppression.’ It went on to say that a novel like Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart might ‘trigger readers who have experienced racism, colonialism, religious persecution, violence, suicide and more.’ It further cautioned faculty to ‘[r]emove triggering material when it does not contribute directly to the course learning goals.’”
    [Retrieved from https://www.aaup.org/report/trigger-warnings%5D
    “I’ll end this piece by highlighting an example of a college professor I had who did this right. Long before I knew about feminism or trigger warnings at all, I read the novel McTeague for a college course. In the run-up to the book, our professor told us that it would feature some implied sexual violence. In other words, she told us we might be a bit creeped out. She was right; it’s a pretty gross book. But we were prepared well ahead of time, and we came to class ready to discuss how the book navigated these topics.”
    [Retrieved from https://www.themarysue.com/trigger-warnings-arent-coddling/%5D
    “At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you ever feel the need to step outside during one of these discussions, either for a short time or for the rest of the class session, you may always do so without academic penalty. (You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually.)
    If you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to this material, either with the class or with me afterwards, I welcome such discussion as an appropriate part of our coursework.”
    [Retrieved from https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2014/05/29/essay-why-professor-adding-trigger-warning-his-syllabus%5D
    “We are discussing sexual assault tomorrow; this is especially difficult material, and, statistically speaking, there are some few sexual assault survivors in this class. I want to remind you that mental health services are available, and that you can come to office hours if you have thoughts about the material that you were not comfortable sharing in class.”
    [Retrieved from https://orgs.law.harvard.edu/halt/trauma-recognition-in-law-schools/why-professors-should-warn-about-course-content/%5D

  13. 2015-01557
    Comm 120
    1. “Content Notice: This semester our objects of study deal with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry, and violence. As a result, this class will be a space to think deeply about explicit and, in some cases, disturbing texts … ”
    — Ismail Muhammad, graduate student instructor at University of California, Berkeley
    2. “This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence … ”
    — Meredith Loken, doctoral student at the University of Washington

    “I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.”
    — Steven Hammer, assistant professor of communication and digital media, Saint Joseph’s University

    Retrieved from http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    4. “At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you suspect that specific material is likely to be emotionally challenging for you, I’d be happy to discuss any concerns you may have before the subject comes up in class. Likewise, if you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to course material with the class or with me individually afterwards, I welcome such discussions as an appropriate part of our classwork.
    If you ever feel the need to step outside during a class discussion you may always do so without academic penalty. You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually to discuss the situation.”
    Retrieved from https://studentactivism.net/2015/08/25/trigger-warnings-for-syllabi-a-how-to-one-year-along/
    5. “This course will explore the main themes, trends, and dilemmas in the history of the United States. In accord with our college’s new policy on trigger warnings, I have affixed a cautionary note to each week’s topic. If the topic threatens to provoke feelings of trauma or panic in you, please inform me beforehand and I will excuse you from class. I’m looking forward to learning together in a safe environment!”
    Retrieved from http://www.chronicle.com/blogs/conversation/2014/05/20/my-syllabus-with-trigger-warnings/

    “”If at any point you must leave the class, please do so quietly. Several of the readings could be triggers, and I want you to feel safe in the class at all times.”
    Retrieved from https://www.tolerance.org/magazine/why-i-support-trigger-warnings
    “The following episode contains scenes that some viewers may find disturbing and/or may not be suitable for younger audiences, including graphic depictions of rape and assault. Viewer discretion is advised.”
    -Netflix warning at the beginning of the first episode of Thirteen Reasons Why

    Photo from http://www.indiewire.com/2017/05/13-reasons-why-netflix-trigger-warnings-increased-1201811380/

    “Next week, we will be watching a film in class that includes scenes of military combat.”
    “In week five, we will read a novel that contains graphic depictions of sexual assault
    Please make a note so that you are prepared to encounter those sections when you read.”
    “I found an article about the kinds of personal barriers community college students• sometimes face. Before you read it, please know that some of the examples cover detailed explanations of child abuse.”

    Retrieved from: https://www.cccd.edu/employees/hr/equity/Documents/Inclusion/Inclusion_TriggerWarnings_Final_EIC_Accessible.pdf

  14. “Don’t try this at home.” (for dangerous stunts, etc.)
    “This game contains strong language and scenes of explicit violence and gore.” (computer games featuring violence)
    “The views and opinions of the guest do not necessarily reflect those of the host, the program, the management, and the network.” (The Bottomline by Boy Abunda, ABS-CBN)
    “We are not asking the LGBT community to change who they are. We are simply asking that they do not force us to change who we are either.” Barry H. Corey, President of Biola University (https://www.google.com.ph/search?q=religious+discrimination+in+american+universities&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiWkITmz-fVAhVGwbwKHf4uAhgQ_AUICygC&biw=1366&bih=652#imgrc=jQbbEshPg1IcCM
    There are religious institutions in California-Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, and Islamic- all accredited, everyone of whom, in accord with all the major religions in the world, believe that gender matters, that maleness and femaleness is not arbitrary, that it’s not interchangeable, that it’s not inconsequential. -John Jackson, President of William Jessup University (http://dailysignal.com/2016/07/25/californias-war-on-my-religious-college-and-others/)
    “We will be faithful to our biblical and religious convictions no matter what the economic consequences. However, the fundamental reality is that might mean a reduction in services, it might mean a reduction in programs.” -John Jackson, President of William Jessup University (http://dailysignal.com/2016/07/25/californias-war-on-my-religious-college-and-others/)
    “You’re welcome to come, as long as you know we expect you to abide by this moral code, because we’re Catholics.” Masteller, Thomas Aquinas College (http://dailysignal.com/2016/07/25/californias-war-on-my-religious-college-and-others/)
    “I want to reassure all of you that our Muslim students are welcome at our University. Our Catholic teaching instructs us to embrace our fellow human beings of all faith traditions. They enrich us with their presence and help to promote inter-religious and inter-cultural understanding. I regret very much that our Muslim students have been used as pawns in a manufactured controversy. I urge all of you continue to show one another the respect and goodwill that are the hallmarks of The Catholic University of America.” John Garvey, President of the Catholic University of America (https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/post/catholic-u-responds-to-lawsuit-charging-muslim-discrimination/2011/10/29/gIQAd1XmZM_blog.html?utm_term=.f7a9a2cdba47)
    “The following preview has been approved for appropriate audiences.” http://katiechromepictures.blogspot.com/2015/02/film-trailer-warning.html
    “Like so many texts in the Western canon, it contains triggering and offensive material that marginalizes student identities in the classroom. These texts, wrought with histories and narratives of exclusion and oppression, can be difficult to read and discuss as a survivor, a person of color, or a student from a low-income background.” – Ovid, Columbia University
    (http://www.chronicle.com/article/Academic-Ethics-The-Legal/238356)

  15. 1.graphic descriptions of or extensive discussion of abuse, especially sexual abuse or torture
    Source: http://geekfeminism.wikia.com/wiki/Trigger_warning
    2. graphic descriptions of or extensive discussion of self-harming behaviour such as suicide, self-inflicted injuries or disordered eating
    Source: http://geekfeminism.wikia.com/wiki/Trigger_warning
    3. “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that the following program may contain images and voices of deceased persons”.
    Source: http://geekfeminism.wikia.com/wiki/Trigger_warning
    4. “This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence … ”
    — Meredith Loken, doctoral student at the University of Washington
    Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    5. “Content Notice: This semester our objects of study deal with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry, and violence. As a result, this class will be a space to think deeply about explicit and, in some cases, disturbing texts … ”
    — Ismail Muhammad, graduate student instructor at University of California, Berkeley
    Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    6. “I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.”
    — Steven Hammer, assistant professor of communication and digital media, Saint Joseph’s University
    Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    7. The course examines issues that “might be sensitive for some” including underage sex, self-harm, drug use, homelessness, Aids, “queer lifestyles” and religion.
    Source:http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/trigger-warnings-universities-students-us-uk-a7353061.html
    8. Descriptions/pictures of medical procedures (even if they don’t contain blood or gore)
    Source: http://privilege101.tumblr.com/triggers.html
    9. Our classroom provides an open space for the critical and civil exchange of ideas. Some readings and other content in this course will include topics that some students may find offensive and/or traumatizing. I’ll aim to forewarn students about potentially disturbing content and I ask all students to help to create an atmosphere of mutual respect and sensitivity.
    Source: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger
    10. Next class our discussion will probably touch on the sexual assault that is depicted in the second last chapter of The White Hotel. This content is disturbing, so I encourage you to prepare yourself emotionally beforehand. If you believe that you will find the discussion to be traumatizing, you may choose to not participate in the discussion or to leave the classroom. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so if you leave the room for a significant time, please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.
    Source: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger

  16. TRIGGER WARNING EXAMPLES
    1. ”You will find that we expect members of our community to be engaged in rigorous debate, discussion and even disagreement,” part of the note reads. “At times this may challenge you and even cause discomfort.” (Holmes, 2017)
    2. “A quick heads-up. The reading for this week contains a graphic depiction of sexual assault.” (Manne, 2015)
    3. “Content Notice: This semester our objects of study deal with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry, and violence. As a result, this class will be a space to think deeply about explicit and, in some cases, disturbing texts … ” (Muhammad, n.d as cited in Smith, 2016)
    4. “This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence … ” (Loken, n.d as cited in Smith, 2016)
    5. “I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.” (Hammer, n.d ac cited in Smith, 2016)
    6. “The reading for this week includes a graphic description of sexual assault,” or a note on a syllabus that reads, “This course deals with sensitive material that may be difficult for some students.” (Downes, 2016)
    7. “Warning: Although this university values and encourages civil expression and respectful personal behavior, you may at any moment, and without further notice, encounter ideas, expressions and images that are mistaken, upsetting, dangerous, prejudiced, insulting or deeply offensive. We call this education.” (Rauch, n.d as cited in Adler, 2015)
    8. “This course will explore the main themes, trends, and dilemmas in the history of the United States. In accord with our college’s new policy on trigger warnings, I have affixed a cautionary note to each week’s topic. If the topic threatens to provoke feelings of trauma or panic in you, please inform me beforehand and I will excuse you from class. I’m looking forward to learning together in a safe environment!” (Zimmerman, 2014)
    9. “Course Content Note: At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you ever feel the need to step outside during one of these discussions, either for a short time or for the rest of the class session, you may always do so without academic penalty. (You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually.) If you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to this material, either with the class or with me afterwards, I welcome such discussion as an appropriate part of our coursework.” (Johnston, 2015)
    10. “If at any point you must leave the class, please do so quietly. Several of the readings could be triggers, and I want you to feel safe in the class at all times.” (Clemens, 2016)

    Sources
    Adler, J. (2015, November 12). A new trigger warning for college campuses. Retrieved August 23, 2017, from The Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2015/11/12/a-new-trigger-warning-for-college-campuses/?utm_term=.2aa680e4c972
    Clemens, C. (2016, June 6). Why I Support Trigger Warnings. Retrieved August 23, 2017, from Teaching Tolerance: https://www.tolerance.org/magazine/why-i-support-trigger-warnings
    Downes, S. (2016, September 10). Trigger Warnings, Safe Spaces and Free Speech, Too. Retrieved August 23, 2017, from The New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/11/opinion/trigger-warnings-safe-spaces-and-free-speech-too.html
    Holmes, L. (2017, February 6). A Quick Lesson On What Trigger Warnings Actually Do. Retrieved August 23, 2017, from huffingtonpost.com: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/university-of-chicago-trigger-warning_us_57bf16d9e4b085c1ff28176d
    Johnston, A. (2015, August 25). Syllabus Trigger Warnings: A How-To, And Some Reflections, One Year Along. Retrieved August 23, 2017, from Student Activism: https://studentactivism.net/2015/08/25/trigger-warnings-for-syllabi-a-how-to-one-year-along/
    Manne, K. (2015, September 19). Why I Use Trigger Warnings. Retrieved August 23, 2017, from nytimes.com: https://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/20/opinion/sunday/why-i-use-trigger-warnings.html
    Smith, I. (2016, September 21). Content Notice: Here Are A Few Ways Professors Use Trigger Warnings. Retrieved August 23, 2017, from npr.org: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings
    Zimmerman, J. (2014, May 20). My Syllabus, With Trigger Warnings. Retrieved August 23, 2017, from The Chronicle of Higher Education: http://www.chronicle.com/blogs/conversation/2014/05/20/my-syllabus-with-trigger-warnings/

  17. We’ll embed the video here, with the warning that it contains images and language that viewers might find disturbing.

    Source: http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/07/07/485066807/police-stop-ends-in-black-mans-death-aftermath-is-livestreamed-online-video

    I would like to trigger warn that I am about to go into a detailed discussion about an experience of sexual assault. Please feel free to leave at any time throughout this discussion if you wish.

    Source: https://nowsa2017.com/trigger-warning-policy-2/

    Our classroom provides an open space for the critical and civil exchange of ideas. Some readings and other content in this course will include topics that some students may find offensive and/or traumatizing. I’ll aim to forewarn students about potentially disturbing content and I ask all students to help to create an atmosphere of mutual respect and sensitivity.

    Source: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger

    Next class our discussion will probably touch on the sexual assault that is depicted in the second last chapter of The White Hotel. This content is disturbing, so I encourage you to prepare yourself emotionally beforehand. If you believe that you will find the discussion to be traumatizing, you may choose to not participate in the discussion or to leave the classroom. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so if you leave the room for a significant time, please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.

    Source: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger

    The following reading includes a discussion of the harsh treatment experienced by First Nations children in residential schools in the 1950s. This content is disturbing, so I encourage everyone to prepare themselves emotionally before proceeding. If you believe that the reading will be traumatizing for you, then you may choose to forgo it. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.

    Source: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger

    A quick heads-up. The reading for this week contains a graphic depiction of sexual assault.

    Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/20/opinion/sunday/why-i-use-trigger-warnings.html

    At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you ever feel the need to step outside during one of these discussions, either for a short time or for the rest of the class session, you may always do so without academic penalty. (You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually.)
    If you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to this material, either with the class or with me afterwards, I welcome such discussion as an appropriate part of our coursework.

    Source: https://studentactivism.net/2015/08/25/trigger-warnings-for-syllabi-a-how-to-one-year-along/

    Warning: this comic occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors).

    Source: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ContentWarnings

    Striktong patnubay at gabay ng magulang ang kailangan. Maaring may maseselang tema, lengguwahe, karahasan, sekswal, horror, o droga, na hindi angkop sa mga bata.

    Source: http://freakylogo.wikia.com/wiki/Rated_SPG

    This program contains some material that many parents would find unsuitable for children under 14 years of age. Parents are strongly urged to exercise greater care in monitoring this program and are cautioned against letting children under the age of 14 watch unattended. This program may contain one or more of the following: intensely suggestive dialogue (D), strong coarse language (L), intense sexual situations (S), or intense violence (V).

    Source: http://www.tvguidelines.org/ratings.htm

  18. 2014-00404
    COMM 120
    1. “This is a post about trigger warnings. If the mere thought of a trigger warning upsets you, this post will upset you. You may also be upset by references below to the diverse things about which trigger warnings warn. Yes, this paragraph is a trigger warning. Read on at your own risk, or stop reading now.” By David Moshman

    Retrieved from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-moshman/a-generic-trigger-warning_b_8074320.html

    “This is college. You will encounter topics, facts, interpretations, ideas, claims, conclusions, metaphors, images, stories, hypotheses, theories and perspectives that upset you. Deal with it.” By David Moshman

    Retrieved from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-moshman/a-generic-trigger-warning_b_8074320.html

    “…We are reading this work in spite of the author’s racist frameworks because his work was foundational to establishing the field of anthropology, and because I think together we can challenge, deconstruct, and learn from his mistakes.”

    Retrieved from: http://web.archive.org/web/20131122144749/http://new.oberlin.edu/office/equity-concerns/sexual-offense-resource-guide/prevention-support-education/support-resources-for-faculty.dot

    “…This documentary challenges heterosexism in an important way. It is vital to discuss this issue. I think watching and discussing this documentary will help us become better at challenging heterosexism ourselves.”

    Retrieved from: http://web.archive.org/web/20131122144749/http://new.oberlin.edu/office/equity-concerns/sexual-offense-resource-guide/prevention-support-education/support-resources-for-faculty.dot

    “Trigger warning: This book contains a scene of suicide.”

    Retrieved from: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/mar/05/trigger-warnings-can-be-counterproductive

    “The list includes each instance of sexual assault, rape and self-harm, emphasizing which episodes should be avoided if you think you’ll be triggered by a situation on the show. And, of course, even if you haven’t dealt with any issues pertaining to what the warnings are referencing, it is always nice just to know what you’re going to see before you sit down.” By Brianna Wiest

    Retrieved from: http://www.teenvogue.com/story/this-master-list-of-13-reasons-why-trigger-warnings-is-so-important

    “ TW: graphic rape scene in the pilot; insinuates lots of sexualized violence to come ” by flamingninjaofthemist

    Retrived from: http://www.imdb.com/list/ls056420051/

    “Trigger Warning: Allegations Of Off-Campus Sexual Assault”

    Retrieved from: http://cms.cerritos.edu/police/trigger-warning-03-02-17.htm

    “Trigger warning: This column will include discussion of ideas that may conflict with your own.” By Kathleen Parker

    Retrieved from: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-swaddled-generation/2015/05/19/162ea17a-fe6a-11e4-805c-c3f407e5a9e9_story.html?utm_term=.46e0b8b0d3e6

    “Warning: This course may cause emotional distress” By Kathleen Smith

    Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/monitor/2014/07-08/course-distress.aspx

  19. Comm 120 (Angelica Yang)
    2014-49323

    “You will find that we expect members of our community to be engaged in rigorous debate, discussion and even disagreement,” part of the note reads. “At times this may challenge you and even cause discomfort.”

    Retrieved from a Huffington Post Article about a controversial Ivy League welcome letter: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/university-of-chicago-trigger-warning_us_57bf16d9e4b085c1ff28176d

    “It consists of a professor’s saying in class, “The reading for this week includes a graphic description of a graphic sexual assault,” or a note on a syllabus that reads, “This course deals with sensitive material that may be difficult for some students.””

    Retrieved from an NY Times opinion piece about trigger warnings: https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/11/opinion/trigger-warnings-safe-spaces-and-free-speech-too.html?mcubz=0

    “I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial, and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge of trigger you.” -Steven Hammer, St. Joseph’s University.

    Retrieved from: http://dailycaller.com/2016/09/27/trigger-warnings-in-actual-college-courses-are-as-dumb-as-you-imagine-only-more-so/

    “MANY OF THE FOLLOWING IMAGES DEPICT GRAPHIC VIOLENCE.” -this was posted before the viewer would scroll down through a slew of EJK-related photos.

    Retrieved from: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/12/07/world/asia/rodrigo-duterte-philippines-drugs-killings.html?mcubz=0

    “He tells his students at the beginning of each course, “This is hard history. It’s hard to talk about, hard to absorb. It’s filled with trauma, sexual violence, racial violence, visual images of murder and chaos. You may walk into my classroom and see an image of a lynching that was put on a postcard. This is America.””

    Retrieved from: http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/09/07/492979242/half-of-professors-in-npr-ed-survey-have-used-trigger-warnings

    “Our classroom provides an open space for the critical and civil exchange of ideas. Some readings and other content in this course will include topics that some students may find offensive and/or traumatizing. I’ll aim to forewarn students about potentially disturbing content and I ask all students to help to create an atmosphere of mutual respect and sensitivity.”

    Retrieved from: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger

    “One undergraduate studying English was given a warning about Robert Lowell’s poem For The Union Dead, because it contains a racial epithet. She said: ‘We were warned that the poem contained a racial slur and that we could leave the room before it was read out or cover it up on the page.’ – a student who was given a trigger warning

    Retrieved from: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3579086/Oxford-law-students-fragile-hear-violent-crime-Undergraduates-given-trigger-warnings-traumatic-material.html

    “I settled for a trigger warning at the beginning of the session: “If you are going to be upset by images of semi-naked women don’t look at the Daily Star, pick one of the other papers.”” -a professor issues a trigger warning before the lesson

    Retrieved from: https://theconversation.com/trigger-warnings-about-war-graves-do-not-molly-coddle-archaeology-students-they-are-essential-66292

    “The first thing I explain is that Pope’s poem contains language, as in its title, that could trigger a stress response for a survivor of sexual assault; and further, the poem involves bodily violence against a woman. I give this warning even though I know Pope was writing in the mock-epic tradition, deliberately and ironically dramatizing a prank of little consequence as though it were an earth-shifting event.”

    Retrieve from: https://newrepublic.com/article/121820/my-students-need-trigger-warnings-and-professors-do-too

    “For example, a student might be forewarned that J. M. Coetzee’s “Disgrace” details colonial violence, racism, and rape with a note on the class syllabus that would read something like “Trigger Warning: This book contains scenes of colonialism, racism, and rape, which may be upsetting to students who have experienced colonialism, racism, or rape.””

    Retrieved from: http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/trigger-warnings-and-the-novelists-mind

  20. “Once here you will discover that one of the University of Chicago’s defining characteristics is our commitment to freedom of inquiry and expression … Members of our community are encouraged to speak, write, listen, challenge, and learn, without fear of censorship. Civility and mutual respect are vital to all of us, and freedom of expression does not mean the freedom to harass or threaten others. You will find that we expect members of our community to be engaged in rigorous debate, discussion, and even disagreement. At times this may challenge you and even cause discomfort.
    Our commitment to academic freedom means that we do not support so called ‘trigger warnings,’ we do not cancel invited speakers because their topics might prove controversial, and we do not condone the creation of intellectual ‘safe spaces’ where individuals can retreat from ideas and perspectives at odds with their own.” – Dean of Students John Ellison to University of Chicago Class of 2020 students

    Source: http://www.snopes.com/2016/08/25/university-of-chicago-trigger-warnings/

    “The discussion that is unfolding at school is troubling. This series is rated Mature and the theme is the suicide of a high school student. This show includes graphic violence (rape) and gore, profanity, alcohol/drugs/smoking, and frightening/intense scenes. The purpose of this email is to provide you with this information. Please let your child know that discussion of 13 Reasons Why is not permitted at school due to the disturbing subject matter.”

    Source: http://nationalpost.com/entertainment/television/netflix-adds-trigger-warnings-to-13-reasons-why-after-canadian-school-board-bans-series-for-glamorizing-suicide

    “The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the causes, major events, and consequences of the Cold War, so that students may better understand current policies, global conflict, and political perspectives. This course will prepare students for advanced studies and careers related to teaching, political science, and service in government agencies.

    This course will explore ideas and events that may be shocking, distressing, or offensive to some students. Images and accounts of war atrocities, weapons testing, and violations of human rights are part of this curriculum. In exploring these matters, the instructor aims to foster students’ ability to analyze, critique, and synthesize information in thorough and objective ways as do professional historians.”

    Source: https://ctfd.sfsu.edu/content/trigger-warnings-college-classroom

    Trigger warning for talk of rape

    Source: https://bellejar.ca/2014/02/03/how-to-undermine-a-rape-victim-101/

    Trigger warning: rape, abuse, distress.

    Source: https://feminiam.com/2014/03/04/we-have-all-been-touched-by-evil/

    TW: Discussion of ableist language & bullying

    Source: https://ischemgeek.wordpress.com/2014/02/15/the-case-against-stupid/

    “This post comes with a trigger warning. Discussing a hate group and their leader, I had to chronicle what they’ve done. For those of you who come to my blog seeking writing advice, short fiction, and memoir entries, an article on Fred Phelps might seem off topic. I’ve met the man on two occasions, and as a commentator on trolls, cyber bullies, and internet culture, I felt compelled to weigh in.”

    Source: https://drewchialauthor.com/2014/03/24/fred-phelps-an-ironic-legacy/

    [TW: child abuse] Cry of the Tiger Cub

    Source: https://jaythenerdkid.wordpress.com/2014/03/13/tw-child-abuse-cry-of-the-tiger-cub/

    “…covers a wide range of perspectives on the world… You are therefore certain to encounter ideas that conflict with your values and worldview. Indeed, the art that we look at will sometimes contain messages about identity, religion, science, ethics, justice, equality, and other topics that contemporary people find naive or offensive.”

    Source: http://ncac.org/resource/ncac-report-whats-all-this-about-trigger-warnings

    “I found an article about the kinds of personal barriers community college students sometimes face. Before you read it, please know that some of the examples cover detailed explanations of child abuse.”

    Source: https://www.cccd.edu/employees/hr/title9/Documents/Inclusion_TriggerWarnings_Final_EIC_Accessible.pdf

  21. Comm 120
    2014-09430

    “Babala po mga Kapuso, maselan po ang susunod naming ibabalita.”
    Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHMEYdZ4edU (Unang Balita report on a beheaded woman)
    “A simple message saying ‘This lecture today pertains to sexual assault,’ perhaps, will give students some insight into what’s about to be discussed and those who feel it may influence their mental health will be warned accordingly.”
    Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/university-of-chicago-trigger-warning_us_57bf16d9e4b085c1ff28176d
    “I warned my students at Clemson because I knew that a significant number of them were practicing Christians, many of them self-identifying as Evangelicals, and they would find [God is Dead by Ron Currie Jr.] that explores the literal death of God as unsettling, a challenge to the validity of their faith.”
    Retrieved from https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/just-visiting/why-and-how-one-instructor-uses-trigger-warnings
    “We’ll embed the video here, with the warning that it contains images and language that viewers might find disturbing.” – National Public Radio
    Retrieved from http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/07/07/485066807/police-stop-ends-in-black-mans-death-aftermath-is-livestreamed-online-video
    “This is hard history. It’s hard to talk about, hard to absorb. It’s filled with trauma, sexual violence, racial violence, visual images of murder and chaos. You may walk into my classroom and see an image of a lynching that was put on a postcard. This is America.” – Hasan Jeffries, an associate professor of history at Ohio State University
    Retrieved from Hasan Jeffries, an associate professor of history at Ohio State University
    “Next week, we will be watching a film in class that includes scenes of military combat.”
    “In week five, we will read a novel that contains graphic depictions of sexual assault. Please make a note so that you are prepared to encounter those sections when you read.”
    “I found an article about the kinds of personal barriers community college students sometimes face. Before you read it, please know that some of the examples cover detailed explanations of child abuse.”
    Retrieved from https://www.cccd.edu/employees/hr/title9/Documents/Inclusion_TriggerWarnings_Final_EIC_Accessible.pdf
    “As you know, a course on catastrophe necessarily deals with several topics and sources that discuss, depict, and envision difficult subjects. I recognize that for some members of the course personal experiences may make a particular topic very hard to process, and even inappropriate for academic consideration at this time. If you are concerned about our engagement with a particular topic, issue or source, please come see me and we can determine an appropriate route forward. Alternate assignments can be arranged if needed, so please don’t hesitate to open this conversation with me. Of course such a discussion would be confidential.”- NANCY K. BRISTOW, History professor at University of Puget Sound in Tacoma
    http://tah.oah.org/may-2015/trauma-and-trigger-warnings-in-the-history-classroom/
    “WARNING: Deep-Sea Prisoner rates this game “ages 15 and up,” mostly due to graphic content later in the game.
    (This rating is Japan-centric and would likely be more strict by other countries’ standards; 18 and up may be more appropriate.) I would advise against playing if you think you may be upset by implied sexual assault and violent imagery.
    Deep-Sea Prisoner also insists that players should be able to keep reality and fiction separate.”

    – TW fot Wadanohara and the Great Blue Sea, an indie game
    Retrieved from http://vgperson.com/games/wadanohara.htm

  22. 2015-05905

    From University of California, Berkeley graduate teasing assistant Ismail Muhammad:
    Content notice: This semester our subjects of study deal with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry, and violence. As a result, this class will be a space to think deaply about explicit and in some cases, disturbing texts.
    From University of Washington graduate teaching assistant Meredith Loken
    This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence.
    From Saint Joseph’s University communication studies professor Steven Hammer:
    I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address, and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.

    source for number’s 1-3: http://dailycaller.com/2016/09/27/trigger-warnings-in-actual-college-courses-are-as-dumb-as-you-imagine-only-more-so/

    From Angus Johnston’s, a historian and advocate of American student organizing, syllabus
    Course Content Note: At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you ever feel the need to step outside during one of these discussions, either for a short time or for the rest of the class session, you may always do so without academic penalty. (You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually.)If you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to this material, either with the class or with me afterwards, I welcome such discussion as an appropriate part of our coursework.

    From Angus Johnston’s revised syllabus
    Course Content Note:At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you suspect that specific material is likely to be emotionally challenging for you, I’d be happy to discuss any concerns you may have before the subject comes up in class. Likewise, if you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to course material with the class or with me individually afterwards, I welcome such discussions as an appropriate part of our classwork. If you ever feel the need to step outside during a class discussion you may always do so without academic penalty. You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually to discuss the situation.

    source for number 4-5: https://studentactivism.net/2015/08/25/trigger-warnings-for-syllabi-a-how-to-one-year-along/

    From Oberlin College in Ohio
    Be aware of racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism, cissexism, ableism, and other issues of privilege and oppression.

    source: https://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/18/us/warning-the-literary-canon-could-make-students-squirm.html?_r=1

    From Twitter’s new safety feature that tags certain accounts as potentially harmful
    Caution: This profile may include sensitive content

    source: http://www.adweek.com/digital/twitter-this-profile-may-include-potentially-sensitive-content/

    Standard content warnings on xkcd comic pages:
    “Warning: this comic occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors).”
    Standard facebook warning on graphic content:
    “Warning – Graphic video: Videos that contain graphic contant can shock, offend and upset. Are you sure you want to see this?”

    source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2909087/Facebook-adds-warnings-graphic-content-shock-offend-upset-does-measure-far-enough.html

    From McPherson Media Group’s video on youtube
    Warning: Video contains graphic content and may disturb some viewers

    source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OcO6p2FO8ww

  23. 2015-05905 – fixed

    From University of California, Berkeley graduate teasing assistant Ismail Muhammad:
    Content notice: This semester our subjects of study deal with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry, and violence. As a result, this class will be a space to think deaply about explicit and in some cases, disturbing texts.

    2.From University of Washington graduate teaching assistant Meredith Loken
    This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence.

    From Saint Joseph’s University communication studies professor Steven Hammer:
    I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address, and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.

    source for number’s 1-3: http://dailycaller.com/2016/09/27/trigger-warnings-in-actual-college-courses-are-as-dumb-as-you-imagine-only-more-so/

    From Angus Johnston’s, a historian and advocate of American student organizing, syllabus
    Course Content Note: At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you ever feel the need to step outside during one of these discussions, either for a short time or for the rest of the class session, you may always do so without academic penalty. (You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually.)If you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to this material, either with the class or with me afterwards, I welcome such discussion as an appropriate part of our coursework.

    From Angus Johnston’s revised syllabus
    Course Content Note:At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you suspect that specific material is likely to be emotionally challenging for you, I’d be happy to discuss any concerns you may have before the subject comes up in class. Likewise, if you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to course material with the class or with me individually afterwards, I welcome such discussions as an appropriate part of our classwork. If you ever feel the need to step outside during a class discussion you may always do so without academic penalty. You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually to discuss the situation.

    source for number 4-5: https://studentactivism.net/2015/08/25/trigger-warnings-for-syllabi-a-how-to-one-year-along/

    From Oberlin College in Ohio
    Be aware of racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism, cissexism, ableism, and other issues of privilege and oppression.

    source: https://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/18/us/warning-the-literary-canon-could-make-students-squirm.html?_r=1

    From Twitter’s new safety feature that tags certain accounts as potentially harmful
    Caution: This profile may include sensitive content

    source: http://www.adweek.com/digital/twitter-this-profile-may-include-potentially-sensitive-content/

    Standard content warnings on xkcd comic pages:
    “Warning: this comic occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors).”
    Standard facebook warning on graphic content:
    “Warning – Graphic video: Videos that contain graphic contant can shock, offend and upset. Are you sure you want to see this?”

    source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2909087/Facebook-adds-warnings-graphic-content-shock-offend-upset-does-measure-far-enough.html

    From McPherson Media Group’s video on youtube
    Warning: Video contains graphic content and may disturb some viewers

    source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OcO6p2FO8ww

  24. 2014-89567

    “Content Notice: This semester our objects of study deal with issues like race, class, gender, sexuality, bigotry, and violence. As a result, this class will be a space to think deeply about explicit and in some cases, disturbing texts…” (University of California, Berkeley graduate teaching assistant Ismail Muhammad)
    Retrieved from: http://dailycaller.com/2016/09/27/trigger-warnings-in-actual-college-courses-are-as-dumb-as-you-imagine-only-more-so/
    “This course is about sexual violence. We willl be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and description of sexual violence.” (University of Washington graduate teaching assistant Meredith Loken)
    Retreived from: http://dailycaller.com/2016/09/27/trigger-warnings-in-actual-college-courses-are-as-dumb-as-you-imagine-only-more-so/
    “I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.” (Saint Joseph’s University communication studies professor Steven Hammer)
    Retrieved from: http://dailycaller.com/2016/09/27/trigger-warnings-in-actual-college-courses-are-as-dumb-as-you-imagine-only-more-so/
    “At times this semester we will be discussing historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatizing, to some students. If you ever feel the need to step outside during one of these discussions, either for a short time or for the rest of the class session, you may always do so without academic penalty. (You will, however, be responsible for any material you miss. If you do leave the room for a significant time, please make arrangements to get notes from another student or see me individually.)

    If you ever wish to discuss your personal reactions to this material, either with the class or with me afterwards, I welcome such discussion as an appropriate part of our coursework.”
    Retrieved from: https://studentactivism.net/2015/08/25/trigger-warnings-for-syllabi-a-how-to-one-year-along/

    “The subject matter of this course can be difficult intellectually and emotionally. We are likely to touch on tough topics, including (but not limited to) police brutality, racism, homophobia, sexual assault, abuse, class and gender issues, and more. If you anticipate acute distress as a result of encountering a particular topic, talk to me ahead of time to arrange an alternative written assignment in lieu of your in-class participation. If you become so distressed that you need to leave during class, talk to me afterward and we can arrange an alternate assignment. I will not “warn” students about particular topics, because sensitivity to different topics varies from person to person, and because topics may arise unexpectedly in class discussion. Additionally, as you may know, there is a difference between being triggered (in the sense of post-traumatic stress disorder) and feeling uncomfortable. Feeling uncomfortable (and sometimes even angry or offended) is part of intellectual growth. Feeling triggered or psychologically traumatized is not. Please take care of yourselves and each other, and let me know if I can do anything at all to help.”
    Retrieved from: https://vptl.stanford.edu/faculty-instructors/diversity-inclusion/trauma-and-trigger-warnings

    6.“I will not give trigger warnings for individual readings and assignments, as it is hard to know what will trigger whom. But I want to say something about triggering for the overall course. Course content will address multiple forms of violence, which may include rape, child abuse, physical assault and murder, genocide, as well as systemic violence derived from racism, ethnocentrism, ablism, homophobia/heterosexism, and/or transphobia. Be aware of that, take care of yourself, support each other. This material will push us emotionally, intellectually, and psychically. I want you to understand the difference between feeling bad about something and recognizing your emotional response vs. being triggered, experiencing symptoms of PTSD, flashbacks, or reliving past trauma. If you feel yourself being triggered, you may leave the room without explanation, excuse yourself from a conversation, or contact me about alternative assignments.

    Because this is a course in which we will be working with materials in sexuality studies, gender studies, race and ethnicity studies, and disability studies, the assigned readings and film/video viewings may include mature language, racially charged content, sexually explicit materials, visual representations of bodies in various states of dress and/or sexual acts, and descriptions of sexual activity. If you have any personal concerns about viewing or reading such materials, please talk to me individually. Modified or alternative readings can be arranged on an individual basis if necessary. We should all work together to foster a respectful atmosphere for discussion (“safe space, brave space”). If you are feeling triggered by material and do not wish to be present during a particular discussion, you may excuse yourself without need for explanation. I recognize that the theme of this course can bring sensitive topics to the fore, and I hope that you will communicate with me by email or during office hours to work together to address any concerns you might have.”
    Retrieved from: https://vptl.stanford.edu/faculty-instructors/diversity-inclusion/trauma-and-trigger-warnings

    7.“Warning: Although this university values and encourages civil expression and respectful personal behavior, you may at any moment, and without further notice, encounter ideas, expressions and images that are mistaken, upsetting, dangerous, prejudiced, insulting or deeply offensive. We call this education.”
    Retrieved from: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2015/11/12/a-new-trigger-warning-for-college-campuses/?utm_term=.4aeac638f7fc

    “I would like to trigger warn that I am about to go into a detailed discussion about an experience of sexual assault. Please feel free to leave at any time throughout this discussion if you wish.”
    Retrieved from: https://nowsa2017.com/trigger-warning-policy-2/
    “I can’t predict what material may trigger someone suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder or what will upset people for other reasons. If you are concerned or uncertain about this course, please closely review the course materials and decide whether you want to continue taking it.”
    Retrieved from: https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2015/10/09/middle-ground-trigger-warnings-essay
    “Be aware of racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism, cissexism, ableism, and other issues of privilege and oppression.”
    Retrieved from: https://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/18/us/warning-the-literary-canon-could-make-students-squirm.html?_r=1

  25. Comm 120 Th 4-7
    1. From a syllabus by Caroline Heldman, a professor in Occidental University’s politics department:
    “Over the course of the semester, we will be examining topics that may be emotionally triggering for trauma survivors.”
    http://flavorwire.com/520346/teaching-trigger-warnings-what-pundits-dont-understand-about-the-years-most-controversial-higher-ed-debate

    Dr. Mo Pareles, a postdoctoral fellow in Medieval Literature at Northwestern University, uses a disclaimer for her Medieval Humans and Beasts class:
    “I will not give trigger warnings, except to say here that the literature in this course contains a good deal of nontrivial sexism, racism, violence, and so forth.”
    http://flavorwire.com/520346/teaching-trigger-warnings-what-pundits-dont-understand-about-the-years-most-controversial-higher-ed-debate
    Josh Lambert, a visiting assistant professor of English at University of Massachusetts-Amherst, had used this spoken introduction in his Holocaust-related courses:
    “We’ll be dealing with some harsh images and subjects. These are topics about which many people are understandably sensitive, and yet in this class I specifically want to deal with some texts that are excessive, or strange, or humorous, or difficult to take, or offensive.”
    http://flavorwire.com/520346/teaching-trigger-warnings-what-pundits-dont-understand-about-the-years-most-controversial-higher-ed-debate
    A number of books now come with trigger warnings at some universities: for instance, Ovid’s Metamorphoses.
    “Trigger: sexual assault.”
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/05/11/trigger-warnings-at-oxford-would-threaten-academic-freedom-and-i/
    A number of books now come with trigger warnings at some universities: for instance, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby.
    “Trigger: suicide, domestic abuse and graphic violence.”
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/05/11/trigger-warnings-at-oxford-would-threaten-academic-freedom-and-i/
    An article from BBC used this warning:
    “TRIGGER WARNING – rather ironically, this article could be a trigger. If you feel your mental health could be affected by reading stories about how others can be affected, we advise you read no further.”
    http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-ouch-26295437
    An article from the Huffington Post used this warning:
    “Warning: This post contains graphic depictions of sexualized violence.”
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/soraya-chemaly/syrian-rape-and-chemical-_b_2370638.html
    In 2012 the student newspaper at Amherst College included a warning at the top of a column providing a firsthand account of a sexual assault.
    “TRIGGER WARNING: This content deals with an account of sexual assault and may be triggering to some people.”
    http://amherststudent.amherst.edu/?q=article/2012/10/17/account-sexual-assault-amherst-college
    From James Lindsay’s HIST 435 Jihad and Reform in Islamic History class syllabus:
    “Warning: Although this university values and encourages civil expression and respectful personal behavior, you may at any moment, and without further notice, encounter ideas, expressions and images that are mistaken, upsetting, dangerous, prejudiced, insulting, or deeply offensive.”
    https://collegian.com/2016/02/csu-professors-on-trigger-warnings/

  26. COMM120
    2014-62909

    I will assign and ask that we discuss works that address and/or contain strong language, violence, sexual content, racial and gender inequity, and other representations that may challenge or trigger you.”
    — Steven Hammer, assistant professor of communication and digital media, Saint Joseph’s University

    “This course is about sexual violence. We will be discussing rape and other forms of sexual abuse in class and you are expected to complete assignments concerning these topics. Some of the readings and films for this course are graphic and include narrative, testimony, and descriptions of sexual violence … ”
    — Meredith Loken, doctoral student at the University of Washington

    Source:
    http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/09/21/493913099/content-notice-here-are-a-few-ways-professors-use-trigger-warnings

    “The event conducted just beyond this sign may contain triggering and/or sensitive material. Sexual violence, sexual assault, and abusers some topics mentioned within this event. If you feel triggered, please know there are resources to support you.”

    Source:
    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-09-26/hofstra-university-unveils-trigger-warning-ahead-tonights-debate

    “Our classroom provides an open space for the critical and civil exchange of ideas. Some readings and other content in this course will include topics that some students may find offensive and/or traumatizing. I’ll aim to forewarn students about potentially disturbing content and I ask all students to help to create an atmosphere of mutual respect and sensitivity.”

    “Next class our discussion will probably touch on the sexual assault that is depicted in the second last chapter of The White Hotel. This content is disturbing, so I encourage you to prepare yourself emotionally beforehand. If you believe that you will find the discussion to be traumatizing, you may choose to not participate in the discussion or to leave the classroom. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so if you leave the room for a significant time, please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.”

    “The following reading includes a discussion of the harsh treatment experienced by First Nations children in residential schools in the 1950s. This content is disturbing, so I encourage everyone to prepare themselves emotionally before proceeding. If you believe that the reading will be traumatizing for you, then you may choose to forgo it. You will still, however, be responsible for material that you miss, so please arrange to get notes from another student or see me individually.”

    Source:
    https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/trigger

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