Sec.FWX Media Monitor 5th can be posted here

                        Sec.FWX Media Monitor 5th can be posted here

     The fifth media monitor of Section FWX can be posted here with the usual deadline on Thursday 5pm (Sept. 27).

      In addition to the 12 choices of bonus topics provided last August, any class member who attended any of the U.P. Day of Remembrance activities whether on-campus or off-campus or the September 20 multimedia presentation may review said event as outdoor media using the ethical standards on advocacy work provided last August 31, with the following instructions: 1)For Day-of-Remembrance activities, pls provide a photo showing your attendance by posting it with your comment (or pasting its link) or by emailing the material; for the Sept. 20 activity, if you are not in any of the group photos, pls state “see attendance sheet” if you signed it; or send a selfie of said activity; then 2) Review said event as outdoor media using the ethical standards on advocacy work provided last August 31. This will be counted as bonus even if you have already submitted a post on “Advocacy”.

       For those who are too lazy to look at the media monitor instructions given last August 31, here they are again: Derived from a leading internationally known public relations society as applicable to advocacy work (the paragraph being used as basis of the review/evaluation should be quoted)

ADVOCACY
Strive to serve the public interest by acting responsibly for the sectors they represent.
Provide a voice in the marketplace of ideas, facts, and viewpoints to aid informed public debate.
HONESTY
Adhere to the highest standards of accuracy and truth in advancing the interests of the sectors they represent and in communicating with the public.
EXPERTISE
Acquire and use responsibly all specialized knowledge and experience.
Advance one’s skills and work attitude through continued professional development, research, and education.
Build mutual understanding, credibility, and relationships among a wide array of institutions and audiences.
INDEPENDENCE
Provide objective advice to the sectors they represent.
Be accountable for one’s actions.
LOYALTY
Be faithful to the sectors they represent, while honoring the obligation to serve the public interest.
FAIRNESS
Deal fairly with the sectors they represent, with competitors, peers, the media, and the general public.
Respect all opinions and support the right of free expression.

      Any of the bonus titles (more than 12 choices have been given) can be used in any week provided only one media monitor post can be submitted every week (in order to build the habit among class members of reading and viewing media content with discernment). No bonus topic can be repeated except as stated above (on U.P. Day of Remembrance).

    Happy new chances everyone!

(photo derived from a poster-photo from the U.P. archives)

7 thoughts on “Sec.FWX Media Monitor 5th can be posted here

  1. 5th Media Monitor
    BONUS: #NeverAgain

    Facebook defines hate speech as “direct attack on people based on what we call protected characteristics — race, ethnicity, national origin, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, caste, sex, gender, gender identity, and serious disease or disability” in their community standards section of hate speech. Political affiliations or beliefs were not included in the categories stated above. In the comments that are embedded below, it is clear that they did not violate any rules based on the Facebook community standards on hate speech. Additionally, bullying policies do not apply to public figures since Facebook encourages and allows discourse. These comments can be considered as critical discussions on the consequences of Imee Marcos’ visit to UP Diliman’s Bahay ng Alumni for an event. Imee Marcos is a public figure who is frequently featured in the news and has a large public audience which fits the community rules of Facebook on exceptions to bullying policies. The comments provided below did not in any way attack Imee Marcos on the basis of her physical appearances or disability. They simply stated their opinions on the subject matter which were significant to the discourse of the people who were involved and concerned.

    Photos of comments:

    https://www.facebook.com/plugins/comment_embed.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fpermalink.php%3Fstory_fbid%3D707463449590526%26id%3D368582650145276%26comment_id%3D707608926242645&include_parent=false

    https://www.facebook.com/plugins/comment_embed.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fpermalink.php%3Fstory_fbid%3D707463449590526%26id%3D368582650145276%26comment_id%3D708012762868928&include_parent=false

    SOURCES:
    https://www.facebook.com/communitystandards/hate_speech
    https://www.facebook.com/communitystandards/objectionable_content
    https://www.facebook.com/communitystandards/safety

  2. 5th Media Monitor
    BONUS: Hate Speech

    Albeit occurring in a foreign setting, the general context of online incivility in social media platforms is an issue that is shared by the Philippine virtual sphere. This coverage of France-Presse (2018) posits that “Lawmakers in Honduras are debating a bill that wants to fine administrators of social media networks for online comments deemed offensive or promoting “hate campaigns.”” as a response to the clamors of those who opposed the current government of the country.

    While lawmakers in the Philippines are not planning to pass a similar act that limits the freedom of expression in the virtual setting, it could be argued that through the prevailing system and political decisions, our lawmakers are manifesting what can be labelled as “chilling effect” as witted in Filipino jurisprudence.
    Using this media coverage as the premise, it could be argued that there is a juxtaposition with our country and that of Honduras as the government bodies are sending a clear message that oppositional sentiments are a form of hate speech as they incite violence and prejudice to the lawmakers – despite them being public personalities and individuals of public concern (as discussed in class).

    In both cases and the different spectrum they entail, it is stark that the government of our country and that of Honduras – as cited in the media coverage – are manifesting an attempt to quash free speech by labelling those who oppose as bearers of baseless allegations (and hence, hate speech) that will build prejudice against them despite the nature of their identity in the context of society, law, and ethics.

    Sources:
    https://news.abs-cbn.com/overseas/02/13/18/honduras-lawmakers-debate-bill-seeking-to-curb-online-speech
    https://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp

  3. 5th Media Monitor
    BONUS: Recent Surge in the Prices of Food Items

    One of the most pressing issues our countrymen face today is the fact that the prices of the most basic of commodities has soared to untenable levels. The technical commentary written in the Philippine Star by Hannah Viola deduces the striking problem of inflation to the controlling factor of the prices of electricity and fuel. Citing studies undertaken by the government itself (Department of Finance), the writer states how the heightened price of electricity, in tow with the depreciating value of the peso, translates into higher fees for households. The same factors, aggravated by what is written as “food supply shock” have caused an 8.5 percent increase in inflation rate for food and non-alcoholic beverages.

    A solution brought forward in the article is that supply and demand must be balanced by the power sector. With almost all prices rising, a survey cited taken by Pulse Asia shows that a majority of respondents are dissatisfied with the price of electricity. Despite an encouraging decrease in power rates, prices remain high. It is noted with much emphasis that this all takes its toll on the poor.

    The article points out that the problem of inflation is not merely an economic concern, but a bureaucratic one; a direct after-effect of the government’s failure to ensure efficient means of procuring energy. It mentions the Energy Regulatory Commission which was recently embroiled in scandals reeking of corruption. Proper measures must be put in place to ensure the Filipino people of a competitive and untainted energy industry. Perhaps the only solution to the plight borne on our shoulders is the fix the problem from its deepest roots.

    Sources:

    https://www.philstar.com/other-sections/news-feature/2018/09/06/1849217/commentary-filipino-consumers-face-uphill-battle-inflation

    https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/890403/erc-chair-salazar-sued-for-misconduct-by-colleagues

  4. 5th Media Monitor
    Regular: Ex-detainees say Enrile lied about not jailing director’s foes

    In an article dated September 27, the Philippine Daily Inquirer reported that former Senators Aquilino Pimentel, Jr. and Rene Saguisag, former Commission on Human Rights chair Loretta Rosales and former Bayan Muna representative Satur Ocampo all united to retaliate former Senator Juan Ponce Enrile’s claim that prisoners of martial law did not exist. In Enrile’s conversation with Bongbong Marcos, the former Senator watered down the dehumanizing and emotionally scarring effects of martial law.

    Pimentel, Saguisag, Rosales and Ocampo were all widely-known detainees during martial law. Together, they recounted their horrific experiences while in prison, being tortured at the hands of the military. Pimentel was jailed four times and ousted from office twice for opposing former President Marcos. Saguisag was detained and Ocampo was imprisoned for nine years. Rosales was repeatedly tortured and sexually abused by military personnel. They also countered that Enrile simply rides wherever the political wave goes.

    This article manifested ethical journalism because it went against the appalling statements of former Senator Enrile. The article reported the side of those who were brutally treated, giving them a voice to speak to the audience. Through this article, people are reminded of our nation’s history. This allows them to stand against the repetition of history. The article also manifested the Society of Professional Journalists’ Code of Ethics provision that states that journalists should “boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear.” It did not succumb to the hegemony of the political giants.

    Sources:
    Reysio-Cruz, Matthew. “Ex-detainees say Enrile lied about not jailing director’s foes.” inquirer.net, 27 September 2018, https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1036776/ex-detainees-say-enrile-lied-about-not-jailing-dictators-foes.

    “SPJ Code of Ethics.” SPJ, 9 Sept. 2014, http://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp.

  5. Collective Advocacies

    There were multiple events that lead up to the September 21 Walkout Commemoration. As a member of the student council, I attended many forums, cultural nights, and educational discussions on different topics before the walkout on the 21st.All these events were manifestations of multiple different advocacies from many different groups. Some of them were about martial law victims and human rights violations, but there were also other events that tackled militarization or press freedom The September 21 walkout against tyranny united these many different perspectives and advocacies to fight against the common threat against our society — the threat of a dictatorship.The September 21 protests was a channel for the united message that dissented martial law to get across to a larger sphere of people.

    I believe all these events served the public interest in the sense that it informed many people about the different advocacies we all carry and fight for. Despite the proliferation of fake news and disinformation, these events stood for the truths in our history and our modern day. These truths were not only told in one persons perspectives, but in the perspectives of people from different sectors. People who all had such different experiences in martial law, but who all agreed to one thing – human rights were violated back then and its so close to happening again.

    It was such an empowering experience to feel the fighting spirit among us, Filipinos. What I found even more empowering was an experience I had with those who dissented the opinions of the rallyists in lunette As we were walking down the street, we could hear people making side comments. Some passers-by were shouting their pro-du30 sentiments at us. Others also shouted asking, “nagrarally nanaman?”. The main thing that I found amazing was the fact that despite our anger toward the government, there was a a spirit of tolerance and understanding toward fellow Filipinos despite their opposing views.

    See photo here: feelsonfilms.wordpress.com/2018/09/27/collective-advocacies/ ; for the forum see attendance

  6. 5th Media Monitor
    BONUS: Advocacy

    Attendance in UP Day of Remembrance Activities: see e-mail for photo
    Attendance in September 20 ML Forum: see attendance sheet

    Last September 21, numerous organizations and protesters had marched from various points in Metro Manila and gathered in Luneta Grandstand in remembrance of Ferdinand Marcos’ 1972 Declaration of Martial Law. With the principal calls of “Never Forget” and “Never Forget”, the widescale anti-Marcos and anti-Duterte rally is an evocative example of outdoor media that not only sought out but forwarded the side of the oppressed – the masses who are continuously victimized from the time of the Marcosian dictatorship up to the tyranny of the current Duterte regime.

    Despite the usual negative views against militant collective action, in terms of advocacy work, protesters do aid in informing the public about certain realities that are marginalized or invisibilized in our society. By way of constantly raising their placards, giving out of flyers or polyetos, and spreading accessible, revolutionary works of art through a façade of “vandalism”, they are amplifying out voices that are generally unheard due to state repression.

    Such advocacy works are really genuine in being transparent – not only because the voices of Martial Law survivors and other state victims (both from the past and the present) were shouted out, but because all protesters were one in forwarding their demands from the government. What kind of protest action invites the New People’s Army, the state forces such as the PNP and the AFP, and even the few pro-Marcos and pro-Duterte supporters who loitered around Luneta to join? It was truly the United People’s Action.

  7. 5th Media Monitor (repost)
    BONUS: Advocacy

    Attendance in UP Day of Remembrance Activities: see e-mail for photo
    Attendance in September 20 ML Forum: see attendance sheet

    Last September 21, numerous organizations and protesters had marched from various points in Metro Manila and gathered in Luneta Grandstand in remembrance of Ferdinand Marcos’ 1972 Declaration of Martial Law. With the principal calls of “Never Forget” and “Never Forget”, the widescale anti-Marcos and anti-Duterte rally is an evocative example of outdoor media that not only sought out but forwarded the side of the oppressed – the masses who are continuously victimized from the time of the Marcosian dictatorship up to the tyranny of the current Duterte regime.

    Despite the usual negative views against militant collective action, in terms of advocacy work, protesters do aid in informing the public about certain realities that are marginalized or invisibilized in our society. By way of constantly raising their placards, giving out of flyers or polyetos, and spreading accessible, revolutionary works of art through a façade of “vandalism”, they are amplifying out voices that are generally unheard due to state repression.

    Such advocacy works are really genuine in being transparent – not only because the voices of Martial Law survivors and other state victims (both from the past and the present) were shouted out, but because all protesters were one in forwarding their demands from the government. What kind of protest action invites the New People’s Army, the state forces such as the PNP and the AFP, and even the few pro-Marcos and pro-Duterte supporters who loitered around Luneta to join? It was truly the United People’s Action.

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