The 5th Media Monitor of the first class here

                         THE 5TH MEDIA MONITOR OF THE FIRST CLASS HERE

    The fifth media monitor of the first class can be posted here with the usual deadline on Wednesday 5pm (Sept. 26 here)

      In addition to the 12 choices of bonus topics provided last August, any class member who attended any of the U.P. Day of Remembrance activities whether on-campus or off-campus or the September 20 multimedia presentation may review said event as outdoor media using the ethical standards on advocacy work provided last August 31, with the following instructions: 1)For Day-of-Remembrance activities, pls provide a photo showing your attendance by posting it with your comment (or pasting its link) or by emailing the material; for the Sept. 20 activity, if you are not in any of the group photos, pls state “see attendance sheet” if you signed it; or send a selfie of said activity; then 2) Review said event as outdoor media using the ethical standards on advocacy work provided last August 31. This will be counted as bonus even if you have already submitted a post on “Advocacy”.

     For those who are too lazy to look at the media monitor instructions given last August 31, here they are again: Derived from a leading internationally known public relations society as applicable to advocacy work (the paragraph being used as basis of the review/evaluation should be quoted)

ADVOCACY
Strive to serve the public interest by acting responsibly for the sectors they represent.
Provide a voice in the marketplace of ideas, facts, and viewpoints to aid informed public debate.
HONESTY
Adhere to the highest standards of accuracy and truth in advancing the interests of the sectors they represent and in communicating with the public.
EXPERTISE
Acquire and use responsibly all specialized knowledge and experience.
Advance one’s skills and work attitude through continued professional development, research, and education.
Build mutual understanding, credibility, and relationships among a wide array of institutions and audiences.
INDEPENDENCE
Provide objective advice to the sectors they represent.
Be accountable for one’s actions.
LOYALTY
Be faithful to the sectors they represent, while honoring the obligation to serve the public interest.
FAIRNESS
Deal fairly with the sectors they represent, with competitors, peers, the media, and the general public.
Respect all opinions and support the right of free expression.

    Any of the bonus titles (more than 12 choices have been given) can be used in any week provided only one media monitor post can be submitted every week (in order to build the habit among class members of reading and viewing media content with discernment). No bonus topic can be repeated except as stated above (on U.P. Day of Remembrance).

A happy new week everyone!

     

19 thoughts on “The 5th Media Monitor of the first class here

  1. 5th Media Monitor
    BONUS: Disaster Reporting

    Two provisions in the SPJ Code of Ethics were properly adhered to by the article I’ve linked down below regarding Typhoon Ompong — “Gather, update, and correct information throughout the life of a news story” and “Identify sources clearly, the pubic is entitled to as much information as possible”.

    The article utilised multiple reliable sources such as the NDRRMC, the Cordillera Regional DRRMC, and the PNP to gather statistics and numbers regarding the victims and damages brought about by the typhoon. The sources of these numbers were explicitly stated in the article, allowing the readers to view the sources clearly.

    Source:
    https://www.rappler.com/nation/212296-affected-persons-typhoon-ompong-september-19-2018

  2. 5th Media Monitor

    BONUS TOPIC: Advocacy

    (Group photo attendance)
    https://www.pinterest.ph/pin/create/button/?guid=xfBxeH4CjVNM&url=https%3A%2F%2Fmarichulambino.com%2F2018%2F09%2F24%2Flaw-on-mass-media-comm-6th-exercise%2F&media=https%3A%2F%2Fmarichulambino.files.wordpress.com%2F2018%2F09%2Fcropped-plaridel.jpg%3Fw%3D930%26h%3D450%26crop%3D1&description=Law%20on%20Mass%20Media%20%26%20Comm%206th%20Exercise%20%E2%80%93%20marichulambino.com

    The Marcos Effect, an activity hosted by the COMM 120 class last September 20, 2018 highlighted experiences of resistance, nationalism and determination to fight for press freedom during the Martial Law period. Talks from Inday Espina-Varona and Prof. Danilo Arao clearly explained the how journalists fought for freedom of speech under a regime where censorship, media control and political persecution was rampant. During the Martial Law, hundreds of journalists were detained, tortured and charged with trumped-up cases. Inday Espina-Varona in her discussion mentioned names of journalists who courageously faced the tyrannical rule of the Marcos regime, citing the many human rights violations that the state inflicted upon them. Prof. Danilo Arao illustrated how they continued to write and publish in the most creative ways through the mosquito press and its evolution to the present situation in the alternative media.

    Personally, the discussions created a very clear picture of the power of journalism and how it can influence social change. With the speakers’ familiarity, concrete examples, straightforward and honest knowledge about the media during the Martial Law and in the alterative media and how they connected it to the role of the students as future journalists, we can end that the Marcos Effect activity was successful in upholding the advocacy of press freedom and social justiace. They did not only fill the audiences’ minds with knowledge but more importantly reminded the future journalists of their task: “In the absence of freedom, it is the journalists’ responsibility to fight for it.”

  3. NOTE: Please ignore the first post. This is my final 5th media monitor. Thank you!

    5th Media Monitor
    BONUS TOPIC: Advocacy

    “ADVOCACY
    Strive to serve the public interest by acting responsibly for the sectors they represent.
    Provide a voice in the marketplace of ideas, facts, and viewpoints to aid informed public debate.”

    “EXPERTISE
    Acquire and use responsibly all specialized knowledge and experience.
    Advance one’s skills and work attitude through continued professional development, research, and education.
    Build mutual understanding, credibility, and relationships among a wide array of institutions and audiences.”

    Group photo attendance
    (Photo by: Miguel Salazar)

    [IMG]http://i68.tinypic.com/9lkd3d.jpg[/IMG]

    The Marcos Effect, an activity hosted by the COMM 120 class last September 20, 2018 highlighted experiences of resistance, nationalism and determination to fight for press freedom during the Martial Law period. Talks from Inday Espina-Varona and Prof. Danilo Arao clearly explained the how journalists fought for freedom of speech under a regime where censorship, media control and political persecution were rampant. During the Martial Law, hundreds of journalists were detained, tortured and charged with trumped-up cases. Inday Espina-Varona in her discussion mentioned names of journalists who courageously faced the tyrannical rule of the Marcos regime, citing the numerous human rights violations that the state inflicted upon them. Prof. Danilo Arao illustrated how they continued to write and publish in the most creative ways through the mosquito press and its evolution to the present situation in the alternative media.
    Personally, the discussions created a very clear picture of the power of journalism and how it can influence social change. With the speakers’ familiarity, concrete examples, straightforward and honest knowledge about the media during the Martial Law and in the alterative media and how they connected it to the role of the students as future journalists, we can conclude that the Marcos Effect activity was successful in upholding the advocacy of press freedom and social justice. They did not only fill the audiences’ minds with knowledge but more importantly reminded the future journalists of their tasks which is “In the absence of freedom, it is the journalists’ responsibility to fight for it.”

  4. 5th Media Monitor
    Bonus Title: Advocacy

    I attended the 4pm to 530pm activity dated September 20 (see attendance sheet).

    During that activity, UPRISE convenor Ice Punzalan talked about the First Quarter Storm (FQS) and the role of UP Diliman students in that important event during the Martial Law period. The first part of his talk focused on the history or events that led to the FQS, while the latter talked about the event’s implications in present times.

    While his talk gave me valuable insights as to what transported during the FQS, I believe he could have chosen to provide specific information about the actual event. Given that the ethical standards on Advocacy work dictate that speakers must “acquire and use responsibly all specialized knowledge and experience” in the retelling if past events, I think Mr. Punzalan’s discussion on the FQS would have been better had he specifically cited historical accounts to strengthen his descriptions. As he per his experience as an activist-student-leader, I have no doubt that he is very much aware of the facts surrounding the FQS. I suppose he chose to retell the events in a more lighthearted manner given the event’s time constraints plus his desire to keep the audience’s attention by avoiding information overload. Nevertheless, I think it can’t be denied that his talk lacked the presentation of historical anecdotes.

    Despite not directly tackling the historically-verified happenings during the FQS, Mr. Punzalan’s was able to help me understand the importance of the FQS in relation to its context back then and even today.

  5. BONUS: Advocacy

    On September 20, 2018, I have attended the Marcos Effect alongside with my other COMM 110 classmates. Upon signing the attendance sheet, I was able to reflect on the purpose of this event. It was not only for us students to be aware of the Marcos regime and its’ problems but also of the ways former rallyists would address these issues. A comprehensive history of the student movements was also discussed. Although a value-adding discourse transpired, I still doubt that what I have seen and heard was not colored. This is because the source of information was Stand UP members. Stand UP is a political party here on campus. Violating the SPJ 2014 Code of Ethics, the organizers failed to “avoid conflicts, real or perceived.”

  6. 5th Media Coverage
    Bonus: Marcos Dictatorship

    SPJ Code of Ethics
    – “Gather, update, and correct information throughout the life of a news story”
    – “Boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear”

    The article regarding the 46th anniversary of Martial Law, has gathered information from the event. It also presented diversity by showing the protesters who were against Martial Law and those who support President Rodrigo Duterte. Rappler was able to abide the provisions of the SPJ Code of Ethics.

    Source:
    https://www.philstar.com/headlines/2018/09/21/1853459/martial-law-46th-anniversary-met-protest-rallies

  7. BONUS: Senate Siege
    5th Media Monitor

    Article: Colonel says Trillanes filed for amnesty
    ( https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1035815/colonel-says-trillanes-filed-for-amnesty )

    The following provisions in the SPJ Code of Ethics were abided in the said article: (1) “Provide context. Take special care not to misrepresent or oversimplify in promoting, previewing, or summarizing a story,” (2) “Gather, update, and correct information throughout the life of a news story,” and (3) “Support the open and civil exchange of views, even views they find repugnant.”

    The news article reports that Colonel Josefa Berbigal claims to have received the amnesty application of Trillanes. To provide context, the article was able to include a brief but sufficient background on the issue. It stated the attempt of President Rodrigo Duterte on voiding Trillanes’s amnesty because of his failure to file for an application and admit his guilt.

    It was also able to present the views of the parties involved. It reported Trillanes’s claim that he was able to file an application to Berbigal, which she confirmed by saying that she received the application. In the latter part of the report, it also stated the take of the Office of the Solicitor General or OSG. Despite Trillanes and Berbigal’s claim, they insisted that the Senator was not able to apply for an amnesty. For the reasons: (1) Trillanes was not able to provide a copy of the document when he filed his Supreme Court petition, and (2) the admission of Trillanes’ lawyer Reynaldo Robles that the Senator had no copy of his application form.

  8. 5th Media Monitor
    BONUS: Marcos Dictatorship

    This article clearly followed the provision of the SPJ Code of Ethics, “Give voice to the voiceless.” This is when Fr. Francisco shared a real life story of an evacuee during the siege in Marawi City. Fr. Francisco shared the kindness and the family values Filipinos have to protect not just their own family but also strangers. The inspiring story of the evacuee gave a voice to all the victims of the Marawi City to not give up during the war but as well as we don’t leave one another.

    The article also then abide to the provision of SPJ Code of Ethics, “provide context.” This is because the article shared the snippet preview about the issues with Marcos’ dictatorship by telling the story of Nonoy’s commemoration. In this way, we can see the significance of the Martial Law before and at present time.

    Source: https://news.mb.com.ph/2018/08/21/ninoy-supporters-commemorate-35th-death-anniversary-in-paranaque/

  9. 5th Media Monitor
    BONUS: Disaster Reporting

    SPJ Code of Ethics: Boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear. 

    This provision applies to this article released by the New York Times since it was able to capture different experiences of the victims of the recent Typhoon Ompong. Its writers interviewed people from Northern Luzon, Marikina, Manila, and more, allowing their voices to be heard and their emotions and struggles to surface in an incredibly raw and ultimately sympathetic form.

    SPJ Code of Ethics:  Acknowledge mistakes and correct them promptly and prominently. Explain corrections and clarifications carefully and clearly.

    This provision also applies because at the end of the article, its writers were able to acknowledge that they made a mistake in the earlier released version of the article. It stated explicitly, “An earlier version of this article misstated the name of a Philippine government official. He is Francis Tolentino, not Frank Tokentino.”

    SOURCE: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/14/world/asia/ompong-typhoon-philippines-mangkhut.html

  10. 5th Media Monitor
    Bonus: Disaster Reporting

    News Article: Typhoon Hits Philippines, Bringing Heavy Rains and Stirring Painful Memories (New York Times)

    The Philippine Press Institute Expanded Code of Ethics: Anonymous sources shall be discouraged, especially if they are coming from the public sector or publicly accountable agencies.

    The article above adheres to this provision from the PPI Expanded Code of Ethics as it provided and clearly named the different sources from the people or departments concerned. The article gave relevant information on the damages caused by the super typhoon, as well as other possible effects the typhoon can cause. It also provided other important statistics from the National Weather Service of the Philippines, the governor of Cagayan Province, and the head of Catholic Relief Services in the Philippines. This practice of naming sources helped increase the article’s credibility as the information presented could be backed up with evidence, and was not just based from hearsay alone.

    Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/14/world/asia/typhoon-mangkhut-philippines-luzon.html

  11. 5th Media Monitor

    BONUS: Advocacy (see attendance sheet)

    ADVOCACY
    Strive to serve the public interest by acting responsibly for the sectors they represent. Provide a voice in the marketplace of ideas, facts, and viewpoints to aid informed public debate.

    EXPERTISE
    Acquire and use responsibly all specialized knowledge and experience. Advance one’s skill and work attitude through continued professional development, research, and education. Build mutual understanding, credibility, and relationships among a wide array of institution and audiences.

    Last September 20, the Comm 120 HWX-1 organized The Marcos Effect, a film showing and discussion on youth, media, and martial law. It featured “Mga Alingawngaw Sa Panahon ng Pagpapasya”, a film by Hector Calma which illustrates the social and political struggles of the “Bagong Lipunan” during the Marcos regime. The event also featured talks led by journalist Inday Espina-Varona and Prof. Danilo Arao on the media control and censorship, and how the media strived through the mosquito press, during the martial law.

    In line with the anniversary of the declaration of martial law, and the spread of fake news that the Millenials have “moved on” from the atrocities of the Marcos regime, The Marcos Effect was very timely and fitting, specially that it caters to students, to inform and remind us that it certainly isn’t something we can move on about. The event also exhibited Expertise by inviting prominent speakers who talked about their first-hand experiences as journalists during the martial law, building credibility to the discussions brought upon during the event. The event was also able to voice out their advocacy in many ways, such as the film-viewing, talk discussions, and cultural performances.

  12. 3rd Media Monitor

    Regular

    SPJ Code of Ethics: Test the accuracy of information from all sources and exercise care to avoid
    inadvertent error. Deliberate distortion is never permissible.

    The article posted by The Philippine Star naming the Liberal Party senatorial candidates whom they announced themselves, adhered to the provision stated above as it complete facts and contexts about the liberal party and the other bodies(government) that surround them and are affiliated with them. An important note in this article is the statement by Harry Roque saying that he believes Leni Robredo is not part of the conspiracy to oust the government, thus giving full information from all sources that were involved. It was fairly written and informative to the public.

    Source: https://www.philstar.com/headlines/2018/09/26/1854858/liberal-party-field-bam-aquino-jose-manuel-diokno-erin-taada

  13. 3rd Media Monitor

    Regular

    SPJ Code of Ethics: Diligently seek out subjects of news stories to give them the opportunity to respond to allegations of wrongdoing.

    This provision is violated in the article in which Duterte alleges that the AFP are in collaboration with the “opposition” party, the Liberal Party. Despite the title, no clear representation from the military was gotten as a source to dispute or affirm the claim of the president. For an institution so important in a nation and of public interest, it was important for the soldiers to address these accusations to give further context to the entire issue.

  14. 5th Media Monitor

    On August 16, 2018, Cathrine Gonzales published an article with the headline “3 brothers arrested in Quezon City buy-bust.” The three brothers and their cohort were arrested on the basis of an alleged possession of “shabu, drug paraphernalia, and the buy-bust money of undisclosed amount.”

    Without fair trial, these men’s names were printed on the website of the Inquirer, hurting their reputation within their community. According to the SPJ code of ethics, journalists must “balance a suspect’s right to a fair trial with the public’s right to know. Consider the implications of identifying criminal suspects before they face legal charges.”

    Sources
    http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1022126/3-brothers-arrested-in-quezon-city-buy-bust
    https://www.spj.org/pdf/spj-code-of-ethics.pdf

  15. 5th Media Monitor
    Regular: “Duterte: ‘Soldiers in cahoots with Liberal Party’. ”
    Provision violated: – Diligently seek subjects of news coverage to allow them to respond to criticism or allegations of wrongdoing

    The article discusses the administration’s allegations regarding the Liberal Party’s plans to oust the president and the soldiers that are allegedly in league with them. Citing mostly the president and members of his office, the first few paragraphs express Duterte’s disappointment regarding the allegations. As the article progresses, different members of his office explain their general plan in countering communist attempts to topple the current administration.

    The news story fails to present the side of the Liberal Party in regards to talks of ousting the president. Instead of seeking defense or opinion, the piece only goes off on a tangent on the communist scare and does not even provide even a bit of concrete evidence to substantiate the government’s claims of an oust attempt. It is very biased because it delves into the personal feelings and thoughts of the president, then transitions into a topic that is way off the headline and the lead-in. There seems to be little to no ounce of diligence in seeking the other party’s side.

    Source: Regalado, Edith. “Duterte: ‘Soldiers in cahoots with Liberal Party’ .”, The Philippine Star. Sept. 26, 2018. https://www.philstar.com/headlines/2018/09/26/1854861/duterte-soldiers-cahoots-liberal-party

  16. 5th Media Monitor
    BONUS: Advocacy

    September 20 (4:00-5:30PM) – See attendance sheet

    Mr. Ice Punzalan of UPRISE had discussed the events during Martial Law Era which focused on the First Quarter Storm towards the Diliman Commune and the historical mass demonstrations of Filipino people during that time. It has build the foundation of the event which is a Day of Remembrance for those heroes during Martial Law.

    It was an enlightening session due to its very significant notion. It showed how Marcos Regime put many lives away from them and how the people responded to this. Mr. Punzalan has shared how the voices of the masses should be heard especially pertaining to the ones ostracized and killed, as said in the ethical standards for Advocacy works, “Strive to serve the public interest by acting responsibly for the sectors they represent and provide a voice in the marketplace of ideas, facts, and viewpoints to aid informed public debate.”

  17. 5th Media Monitor
    Bonus Title: “Advocacy”

    I attended “The Marcos Effect” held last September 20 at the CMC lobby (See attendance sheet). I went by 4:30 pm as UP Sikat and Alay Sining were performing. My friend, Justine, sang for UP Sikat, their performance was partnered with a startling interpretative dance. Alay Sining composed a song illustrating the gory blood of Martial Law and how we’re already living in that moment. I think this is the whole rationale of the event since I find this theme in all their given activities.

    After that, Isaac Punzalan provided the history of Martial Law—generally and then in details. He was also connecting Macoy’s administration to our current one—how the first quarter storm and Diliman commune greatly affected Macoy’s oust and how we should do the same today. Nothing’s really changed. In a smaller scale, he also associated it with CMC’s administration—how it’s a metaphor to the current situation the press face as the press during Marcos was daunting, one similar to what Rebel Kule and TNP’s facing right now.

    Overall, I think the event was preparing us for the march due to the Q&A’s. The event addresses how we should never forget, and as UP students we ought to know.

    Ice Punzalana did hold up to the ethical standards for Advocacy: Strive to serve the public interest by acting responsibly for the sectors they represent. Provide a voice in the marketplace of ideas, facts, and viewpoints to aid informed public debate. I have no doubts about his knowledge with regards to Martial Law, Marcos, and the like. However, if we consider the expanded PPI Code of Ethics, this might exude a conflict of interest. There is no doubt as a student-leader to not have their own bias, especially one that’s the past runner for STAND-UP. But then again, he more than anyone-especially one doing so to serve the public interest is sensible to have lectured the talk since he represents the voice of the masses-the sector he represents.

  18. 5th Media Monitor
    Bonus Title: “Advocacy”

    I attended “The Marcos Effect” held last September 20 at the CMC lobby (See attendance sheet). I went by 4:30 pm as UP Sikat and Alay Sining were performing. My friend, Justine, sang for UP Sikat, their performance was partnered with a startling interpretative dance. Alay Sining composed a song illustrating the gory blood of Martial Law and how we’re already living in that moment. I think this is the whole rationale of the event since I find this theme in all their given activities.

    After that, Isaac Punzalan provided the history of Martial Law—generally and then in details. He was also connecting Macoy’s administration to our current one—how the first quarter storm and Diliman commune greatly affected Macoy’s oust and how we should do the same today. Nothing’s really changed. In a smaller scale, he also associated it with CMC’s administration—how it’s a metaphor to the current situation the press face as the press during Marcos was daunting, one similar to what Rebel Kule and TNP’s facing right now.

    Overall, I think the event was preparing us for the march due to the Q&A’s. The event addresses how we should never forget, and as UP students we ought to know.

    Ice Punzalan did hold up to the ethical standards for Advocacy: Strive to serve the public interest by acting responsibly for the sectors they represent. Provide a voice in the marketplace of ideas, facts, and viewpoints to aid informed public debate. I have no doubts about his knowledge with regards to Martial Law, Marcos, and the like. However, if we consider the expanded PPI Code of Ethics, this might exude a conflict of interest. There is no doubt as a student-leader to not have their own bias, especially one that’s the past runner for STAND-UP. But then again, he more than anyone-especially one doing so to serve the public interest is sensible to have lectured the talk since he represents the voice of the masses-the sector he represents.

  19. 5th Media Monitor
    Bonus Title: Recent Surge in the Prices of Food Items

    The article published by Fenol and Guinto on ABS-CBN news entitled, “‘Shrinkflation’ creeps into carinderia plates as prices soar,” explained how to recent surge in the prices of food items are affecting small food businesses such as our carinderias.

    The article was able to successfully give context as to why the idea of “Shrinkflation” was happening, by giving a background of the percentage of increase of the rates of various food items. It made mention of how food prices rose to 8.5 percent in the month of August, surpassing the previous record of 6.4 percent. The article also indicated that the prices of only vegetables rose to 19.2 percent.

    The text was also able to comply with the SPJ provision, “gather, update and correct information throughout the life of a news story,” as it indicated that the rates and prices stipulated within the article only apply to the specified date.

    It was also able to present the issue of the troubling inflation in a way that was understandable to the masses, as it depicted it through a scenario that was relatable to most Filipino masses.

    Source: https://news.abs-cbn.com/business/09/06/18/shrinkflation-creeps-into-carinderia-plates-as-prices-soar

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