Ethics 7th Media Monitor (The News Media 1) SPJ Code of Ethics Deadline Nov. 14

Ethics 7th Media Monitor (The News Media 1) SPJ Code of Ethics Deadline Nov. 14
The seventh media monitor (The News Media 1) (Fair, Foolish, or in a Fix: good practice, violation, or dilemma), can be posted here, either regular or bonus (but not both), using the first half of SPJ Code of Ethics (2014) as discussed in class, with deadline extended to Thursday Nov. 14, 2019 at 5pm.

The post can either be an embedded, or a pasted link leading to the student’s own site. Only a review of events that are current (a review of media coverage starting Nov. 2, 2019 up to Nov. 14, 2019) will be allowed.
Late submissions are considered a forfeit for the week  and would not be credited.
Instructions have been given in class. (As stated before: Students may use pseudonyms or pen names, and conceal their faces, and may also use their own platforms and simply paste the links in the comments section. (If pseudonymous, pls provide the department assistant with your pen name).
Pls use the comments section of this post. As stated, the media monitor commentary may either by typed as text in the comments section or as a link leading to the post in the platform of the classmember/ post author. Pls type in the first line whether the post is a regular media monitor (7th Regular Media Monitor, The News Media 1) or a bonus post (type the Bonus Title) to aid the checker in locating and categorizing each box. Tnx). The title of the Bonus topic for this window is the SPJ provision, “Giving Voice to the Voiceless
Baseless rants will not merit any points – the commentary should use, cite, and quote the pertinent provisions of the 2014 SPJ Code of Ethics as taken up in class this week. For the succeeding weeks, members of the class should be able to cite also the Philippine Journalists Code of Ethics (PPI Code of Ethics and PPI Expanded Code of Ethics), the KBP Broadcast Code, etc.) Failure to provide the pertinent provision will result in a score of zero. The SPJ provisions have been provided in the handouts online. The first half of the SPJ code was also discussed in powerpoint in class.                    BONUS: Giving Voice to the Voiceless. For double the points, a class member may evaluate any news media content that illustrates the following SPJ code of ethics provisions:            “-Be vigilant and courageous about holding those with power accountable. Give voice to the voiceless.”

      “-Recognize a special obligation to serve as watchdogs over public affairs and government. Seek to ensure that the public’s business is conducted in the open, and that public records are open to all.”

      “-Boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear.

      Happy monitoring!

26 thoughts on “Ethics 7th Media Monitor (The News Media 1) SPJ Code of Ethics Deadline Nov. 14

  1. 7th Bonus Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    On November 12, 2019, at 4:07 AM, the Inquirer.net published an editorial titled, “Yes to police body cams”. This editorial is written in relation to Vice President Leni Robredo’s suggestion as to the new drug czar. She is pushing for the use of body cameras in all “tokhang” operations by the police.

    Tokhang operations or anti-drug operations, in general, is and has long been the President’s main goal and flagship program. It has been relaunched for the third time since 2016 and was allegedly suspended in early 2017 after the illegal abduction of a South Korean businessman. But what does this program really entail?

    The editorial made it clear that the victims of Tokhang operations are our poor and helpless kababayan. The “war on drugs” of the President amassed to thousands of extrajudicial killings including children and innocent bystanders. But why does the government let it continue? The common narrative of the police force for shooting firearms is that the victims fought back and resisted arrest. This vicious cycle can be verified through the use of body cameras.

    Body cameras have long been a piece of indispensable equipment by law-enforcement organizations worldwide. This small device protects the people and the police themselves from suspicion of wrongdoings and prevents abuses committed by the police and in some cases by the people. The editorial clearly stated that the reason for not using body cams is that it defeats the purpose of oplan tokhang — “to dispense with rules and engage in shortcuts in order to physically eliminate as many suspects as possible, ostensibly to drive the fear of God or a ruthless President, into the hearts of alleged drug criminals.

    This editorial clearly speaks from the point-of-view of our poor countrymen who can easily be the collateral damage in our President’s war on drugs. Those who cannot outright speak for themselves because of their fear for their lives, fear for the lives of their family, or the sheer lack of knowledge that they have the right to say no and speak up to the policemen at their doorsteps.

  2. With the recent news about President Duterte favoring the ban on single-use plastic in the Philippines, ABS-CBN News published a news article last Nov. 12, 2019 about the ban’s effect in consumers.

    According to the article, the Philippines is the third largest contributor of plastic pollution in bodies of water next to China and Indonesia. Some cities and provinces in the Philippines have already been following a similar law. However, with the President’s approval, it would be effective nationwide and would start affecting people in a larger scale.

    The article was able to tell the opinions of local consumers of how it could affect them. One consumer said that even though the ban on single-use plastic is important to reduce the volume of plastic wastes we are producing, it would still be a problem for them because it would mean that they’re family would have to purchase in bulk. And it is something that they cannot easily afford. What their budget allows are “tingi” pieces or smaller portions which are usually packaged in sachets and single-use packagings.

    ABS-CBN News also included in the article a statement from the advocacy group Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives that we can follow alternatives in order to lessen our wastes. They also mentioned that the Philippines had a time where we used bayongs ang bags, meaning that we can still go back to this practice instead of using single-use plastic.

    Lastly, the article also included a statement from the DENR’s Undersecretary for Solid Waste Management and LGU Concerns Benny Artipoda who said that they are looking into alternatives for plastics like using cassava starch to lessen the burden on the Filipinos when the ban on single-use plastic becomes a law.

    With this, the article was able to gather statements from local consumers who will be affected the most when this ban becomes effective instead of simply interviewing people who are in the position to impose these rules. They were also efficient by adding statements from other groups who can help the public in adjusting to this practice.

  3. For emshaira: Thank you for this. Kindly specify the provision you are illustrating (please see instructions embedded in the post). Tnx. -marichu
    x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
    With the recent news about President Duterte favoring the ban on single-use plastic in the Philippines, ABS-CBN News published a news article last Nov. 12, 2019 about the ban’s effect in consumers.

    According to the article, the Philippines is the third largest contributor of plastic pollution in bodies of water next to China and Indonesia. With this, it is a big concern and issue that the country is facing right now.

    Some cities and provinces in the Philippines have already been following a similar law. However, with the President’s approval, it would be effective nationwide and would start affecting people in a larger scale.

    The article was able to tell the opinions of local consumers of how it could affect them. One consumer said that even though the ban on single-use plastic is important to reduce the volume of plastic wastes we are producing, it would still be a problem for them because it would mean that they’re family would have to purchase in bulk. And it is something that they cannot easily afford. What their budget allows are “tingi” pieces or smaller portions which are usually packaged in sachets and single-use packagings.

    ABS-CBN News also included in the article a statement from the advocacy group Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives that we can follow alternatives in order to lessen our wastes. They also mentioned that the Philippines had a time where we used bayongs ang bags, meaning that we can still go back to this practice instead of using single-use plastic.

    Lastly, the article also included a statement from the DENR’s Undersecretary for Solid Waste Management and LGU Concerns Benny Artipoda who said that they are looking into alternatives for plastics like using cassava starch to lessen the burden on the Filipinos when the ban on single-use plastic becomes a law.

    With this, the article was able to gather statements from local consumers who will be affected the most when this ban becomes effective instead of simply interviewing people who are in the position to impose these rules. They were also efficient by adding statements from other groups who can help the public in adjusting to this practice.

  4. For emshaira: Thank you for this. Kindly specify the provision you are illustrating (please see instructions embedded in the post). Tnx. -marichu

  5. 7th BONUS Media Monitor: Giving Voice to the Voiceless

    On November 9, 2019, The Philippine Star on their website philstar.com, published an editorial article addressing the state of women who were raped and how they should be identified as “courageous” and not as victims.

    In the article, statistics show that there are 70 million more men than women in Indo-Pacific countries. A study led by the United Nations, nearly 5,000 men admitted using physical and/or sexual violence against women, and nearly 2,500 admitted doing the act of rape against women. Further in the article, the writer mentioned a documentary which shows over 200,000 Bangladeshi women who were raped during the Liberation War of Bangladesh in 1971. The documentary featured the strength of women who faced such brutal actions from men and those in power. The director says it shows “their will to survive, and their fighting spirit in the face of rejection and stigma, for the sin of having been raped.”

    In most of the countries in the world, patriarchy is still evident thus giving men power in the society. Women are oppressed and seen as a minority group. The editorial article does not characterize women as victims or as silenced individuals. It highlights how women do not just aim to seek sympathy, but to be given a voice to speak out their rights as human beings. Such as in the case of the Bangladeshi women, they are recognized as “birangona” or “brave women of the war” because of their addition to the nation’s birth. In the article, women are portrayed as fighters; they are heroes.

  6. 7th Bonus Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    On November 11, 2019, bulatlat.com posted an article titled “The Mangyan struggle in Mindoro”. The article focuses on the voices of the Danlog community in Mindoro inhabited by indigenous Mangyan, sharing their struggles and stories about their agrarian life with basic necessities and how they rarely get government assistance for social services and in worst cases, hit by militarization and human rights abuses.

    The article was able to feature 2 interviews/ stories from the residents in Danlog. The first one shared that life in Danlog is simple, but difficult because there’s no bridge across the river. The second one, (another resident who makes a living as a farmer) also shared how planting palay is challenging because of the lack of proper irrigation. Just like the other resident, crossing the river to barangay Monte Claro is a challenge. During the rainy season, the river can reach waist-high and crossing becomes near-impossible. the resident said this is especially problematic when somebody is sick. “We don’t have a lot of medicine in our clinic and doctors sometimes only come here once a year. When there’s an emergency it takes us up to two weeks before we could come down and get help.”

    The second resident also shared stories about the military. There are too many stories and experiences, of harassment from soldiers. Moreover, Mindoro is no stranger to encounters between soldiers and the New People’s Army. According to the article, “some people still have horror stories of Oplan Habol Tamaraw under Jovito Palparan, from 2001-2005. Most residents of Sitio Danlog were hesitant to talk about the presence of soldiers in their sitio, with some even flat out denying it. When they do talk about it, it is always in hushed tones and cautious whispers.” Only one person from the community was brave enough to tell the stories about the military.

    Lastly, the article was able to emphasize that the “Mangyan are the target of intensified state violence due to counterinsurgency program dubbed as Oplan Kapanatagan. Last June, strafing, and bombing operations in Victoria and Mansalay, Oriental Mindoro, forced over 600 Mangyan to evacuate to the lowlands”. Mangyan is linked with development aggression. The article ended by saying that even though there are a lot of challenges, violence, and problems in their community, the Danlog community will remain hopeful. “As long as there are people who want to help us, we’ll manage,”. “We Mangyan have lived here before the soldiers arrived. We’ll be here when the soldiers leave. 

  7. 7th Bonus Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    On November 9, 2019, Rappler published the article “6 years after Yolanda, hundreds of families yet to rebuild houses”– a report that basically talks about how, to this day, close to 700 families in Samar have yet to receive the help that they need from the government to rebuild their houses and get back on their feet.

    According to the article, close to 50 residents from these Samar barangays slipped into the Tacloban Astrodome compound in Leyte during the 6th Yolanda commemoration on Friday, November 8, 2019, to voice their concerns, hoping these would reach President Rodrigo Duterte.

    The article mentioned the concerns that were voiced out by some of these residents. One of which was by a 49-year-old fisherman who stated that, though it’s been 6 years already, no help has reached them yet. Another was by a 53-year-old mother of 7 children who said that: “We were hit hard by that strong typhoon. My home and source of income were gone. But we are trying to rebuild our homes and grow crops now, but still we need help.”

    In my opinion, the article perfectly illustrates one of the provisions of the 2014 SPJ Code of Ethics, which is: “Boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear.” Why? Well it’s because, by creating an article about this, Rappler is able to give the voiceless, which in this case are the victims of Yolanda (which are comprised of fishermen and farmers, among others), a voice. By giving them a space/an avenue in a media (the internet) that’s very powerful, their voices are given the opportunity to be heard by a vast number of people and their concerns are given the chance to actually reach their intended recipient–the government.

  8. 7th BONUS Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    On 4 November 2019, Rappler posted an editorial article entitled “Duterte, tantanan mo na ang mind games”. This surfaced as President Rodrigo Duterte dropped a bomb, appointing vice president Leni Robredo as a drug czar for six months.

    The author has found cracks that entail discourses embedded within this explosion – “ Dahil alam mong ….. sineset-up na pumalpak. Scapegoat ang tawag d’yan. Malamang ay hindi na niya matapos, o tinatamad na siya. Posible ring nakita niyang ‘di niya pala kaya. Ano’t ano man, mawawalan ka ng respeto sa boss mo.”

    Apart from uncovering the cracks that hide different agendas by the president, the author also digs the history of the brutal war on drugs. “Sa 27,000, mahigit 50 sa kanila ay menor de edad. Si Kian delos Santos ay 18 taong gulang. Si Myca Ulpina ay 3 years old. Si Danica Mae Garcia ay 5…..Dugo nila ang umagos sa drug war. Mukha nila ang mukha ng TokHang. Sila ang dapat gunitain, maliban sa ating mga kamag-anak, ngayong Undas.”

    The article gives breath to the struggles of the poor, which are the real victims of the war on drugs. This manifests how media can be a watchdog that can expose the wrongdoings and abuse committed by those in power. It gives voice to people who cannot speak. It showcases the struggles of the countrymen. It opens the eyes of the people.

  9. 7th Bonus Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    On November 9, 2019, The Philippine Daily Inquirer published an article entitled, “Mental health absent in PH climate change plans.” The article discusses how, in the aftermath of Typhoon Yolanda, the survivors experienced mental health problems that had yet to be fully discussed or treated, as the primary interventions were mainly on physical and public health.

    There were concrete measures by the reporter to “give voice to the voiceless”, “boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience” and “seek sources whose voices we seldom hear.” The article presented its case by highlighting separate cases of Yolanda survivors. Despite psychological services given to hundreds if not thousands of them, many still do not receive adequate mental health care years after the storm. One of the informants, who was a noted community leader, even asked her siblings to already kill her should she go ‘crazy’. Another informant, who was now a social worker, also stated that there had been ‘no processing of their trauma’.

    The author also problematized the concept of resilience, continuously used as an excuse for the government and other stakeholders to do nothing, and stated that we should go beyond it. The efforts of the reporter to recount the stories of those on the ground—then later to corroborate their anxieties with responses from mental health officials and medical practitioners, to criticize how it was handled, and to provide interventions going forward—adds a humanistic element to reporting that “recognizes a special obligation to serve as watchdogs over public affairs and government.”

    For these reasons, I believe that the article follows the practices as stated by the SPJ Code of Ethics. These approaches were effective as it provides readers with a full account of a case not just by stating facts, figures, and key personalities, but also by giving a voice to those largely overlooked.

  10. 7th Bonus Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    Today, November 13, 2019, at 1:56 pm, [name redacted] from Rappler published an article entitled “House panel wants in-city relocation for 18k informal settlers along QC’s Segment 8.2”. The news article discussed the relocation plans of the informal settler families (ISFs) of Quezon City, particularly the North Luzon Expressway-C5 North Link project, or Segment 8.2, airing both parties’ (government and ISFs) sides on the issue.

    It illustrates the SPJ provision of “Be vigilant and courageous about holding those with power accountable. Give voice to the voiceless.” because it openly calls out the shortcomings and lack of preparation of the government. In its subtitle, the article stated, “The National Housing Authority have made 1,000 relocation units available, but they are in Bulacan” already presenting us with the con of the government’s plan early on. It also mentioned that off-city relocation has been ineffective in the past.

    It also follows the provision “Recognize a special obligation to serve as watchdogs over public affairs and government. Seek to ensure that the public’s business is conducted in the open, and that public records are open to all”. The article provides facts and details of the operation from primary sources. It mentions that a hearing of the House committee on Metro Manila development was conducted on Nov. 12, that Metro Pacific Tollways Corporation (MPTC) said it can build around 2,500 to 9,400 units for the informal settlers, and that there are still no designs for the houses at the moment. It also revealed the plans of the National Housing Authority (NHA) for the informal settlers, relocating them in Norzagaray and Pandi, Bulacan.

    Finally, it gives a voice to the voiceless by reflecting the provision “Boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear.” The article contains the side of the ISFs through their representative Luz Savilla who said that “the families had not been provided a list of entitlements, census claims, and beneficiary selections from the NHA, as well as details of the proposed relocation site.” The ISFs are also pushing for in-city location, since it is better for them to live in economic centers for survival.

    Overall, the article follows the above provision in the SPJs because it gives a platform for those in the peripheries, the ISFs. It also exposed the shortcomings of the government and their lack of planning for this initiative. It was able to express the sentiments of both parties equally, helping the ISFs realize that they, too, are an important sector of society that should be listened to.

  11. 7th BONUS Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    On November 6, 2019, Rappler published a news article exposing the red-tagging of the Farmers Development Center and 17 other humanitarian and religious organizations by the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) and the Department of National Defense (DND) in a congressional briefing last Tuesday, November 5.

    Fardec is a non-governmental organization that promotes the rights of farmers. They have been representing and helping several farmers’ groups in Cebu, Bohol and Negros Oriental. The organization educates the farmers about their rights to promoting climate-resilient sustainable agriculture so they know how the government has been exploitative of their situation.

    Being a progressive organization in support of farmers, Fardec was red-tagged because they have helped farmers become critical towards government policies that oppress them. Such policies have displaced them repeatedly and have led to the rice tarrification law which kills the local agriculture.

    The news article diligently follows the 2014 SPJ Code of Ethics which revolves around giving voice to the voiceless. In the midst of the agricultural crisis in the Philippines, we never hear much from the country’s local farmers. But just when progressive groups start to spark movement forward, the AFP and DND would red-tag them. This steps on their right to be heard as a minority. To the very least, the published article somehow gave back and even enforced the cries these organizations have been sounding amidst the crises.

    Through Rappler’s published article, light has been shed on the topic, and the issue is brought to the surface. Fardec was able to relay their message: Their inclusion in the red list aimed to silence their advocacy for farmers’ rights. And this is not just for the farmers only but for all the organizations that were red-tagged as well.

    Rappler was able to boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. They were able to voice out the concerns of the farmers and the organizations that fight for them. And as a minority, it is crucial that they were given voices.

  12. 7th BONUS Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    Recently, news about the ongoing strike of the workers of food company Regent Foods Corporation began surfacing, making rounds especially on the internet. Various news outlets, both alternative and mainstream, covered the development of the strike.

    Regent Foods Corporation manufactures snacks like Cheese Ring, Snacku, Sweet Corn, and Tempura, among others. Their workers have been on strike since October 16, mounting their picket lines in front of their Pasig and Taguig plants. They are protesting against the corporation’s unfair labor practices, low wages, and union-busting schemes, as well as calling for their rights to security of tenure and proper benefits.

    A video newscast by Altermidya entitled “Dispersal ng Welga sa Regent” showed how the police and private security forces violently dispersed the worker’s picket line situated in company’s Pasig and Taguig plants.

    The video was graphic as it showed how the police and private forces ganged up on the workers, hitting them with wooden bats and forcing them onto the ground. The wooden bats have sharp implements on their ends (probably nails sticking out of the ends) that added to the worker’s injuries. The video also showed the wounds and injuries sustained by the workers. 24 workers, paralegals, and bystanders were arrested by the police.

    The video also showed an interview with Tita Cudiamat, president of the Regent Workers Union. “Lalo kaming maninindigan at ilalaban naming ang aming mga karapatan,” said Cudiamat.

    This news media content of Altermidya clearly illustrates the provision “Boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear.” It was surely bold of them to feature the news from an angle that shows the reality of how the police violently disperse people who are just calling for their rights. So unlike the coverage of other news outlets that only angle the story in such a way that make it seem that it was the protesters who were violent instead of showing that the police forces were truly the violent ones.

    Other news outlets have headlines such as “23 workers arrested after dispersal at food plant In Pasig”. This removes the whole context and reduces it to a mere arrest situation that seems to put the blame on the workers due to the use of the active voice. Countering these, Altermidya covered the event in a way that focuses on the workers, showing the situations and voices of the workers that often go unheard and uncovered. It is common that when reporting about workers’ strike, only the side of the company are reported. Here, Altermidya clearly subverts this as they amplify the calls of the workers through their video newscast.

  13. 7th BONUS Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    On April 26, 2019, Rappler posted an article calling for help for the Aeta families who were victims of the Luzon quake that happened on April 22.

    After the disaster, the Aeta community had been begging for resources and assistance from the local government authorities. Those who had decided to evacuate in the centers in Sitio Cuyukot and Sitio Balangkas in Barangay Camias found out that their resources were insufficient, and they needed to travel three more kilometers to garner basic necessities such as food, water, and clothing. It has also been reported that some of them had already gotten sick and weak because of this insufficiency.

    That is why Anakbayan Pampanga and the Central Luzon Aeta Association posted on their social media handles some call for help and donations for the disaster’s victims. They further called out the government to help the Aeta community who are trembling in fear because of the quake’s current aftermath.

    I think that this article has followed SPJ’s provision “Boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear.” As we know, the indigenous peoples have not been seen that much in the mainstream media. Their struggles seem to be very foreign especially to the people in teh citya nd in the lowlands. I think the article has emphasized a lot about the state of the Aeta community in times of a disaster, and how they themselves also seek adequate help from the authorities. The article also blatantly stated in the end of the article some bank account information and contact persons, in any case the readers would want to share their help to the community. This is a good practice as aside from giving voice to this oppressed community, specific calls for action were stated to further alleviate their drastic situation.

  14. 7th BONUS Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    On November 13, 2019, The Philippine Star posted an article entitled “De Lima seeks Senate probe into task force blamed for rights violations.” This article describes how Senator Leila De Lima probes the Senate to investigate the alleged human rights violations and red-tagging of the National Task Force to End Local Communist armed Conflict (NTF-ELCAC), a group led by the President.

    According to De Lima, The NTF-ELCAC was established through Executive Order 70 in order to address problems of insurgency through a peaceful, civilian approach rather than one that uses military force. However, many reports have claimed that instead, it was used for “political persecution, harassment, and even violation of human rights.”

    The article aims to inform the public about the alleged abuse of power in how the government chooses to address the country’s insurgency problems. It also cites specific instances of red-tagging such as the arrest of over 50 activists in October 31 and November 1, as well as specific organizations (e.g. Bayan Muna, Gabriela, the National Federation of Sugar Workers, etc) that were raided by the government.

    Because of this, I believe that it illustrates the following SPJ’s provision: “Recognize a special obligation to serve as watchdogs over public affairs and government. Seek to ensure that the public’s business is conducted in the open, and that public records are open to all.”

  15. 7th Bonus Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    On November 7, 2019, the alternative news outlet Bulatlat published an article online titled “Independent think-tank alarmed over ‘notice of police inspection’.”

    The article talks about how the independent research organization IBON Foundation received a call from the National Capital Region Police Office (NCRPO), saying that a warrant of arrest will be served on someone within the organization’s office building. While the organization replied to the NCRPO that the person concerned in the warrant does not hold office in their building, the NCRPO still insisted on conducting an “ocular inspection” of the location.

    The IBON Foundation expressed their concern regarding the notice, believing that it was part of the government’s recent crackdown on various progressive and activist organizations red-tagged by the Duterte administration, as around 60 activists had been arrested the previous week. “The Duterte administration is attacking IBON because our research, education and advocacy work exposes Philippine economic realities that the government wants to conceal,” the organization said in the article.

    As this article by Bulatlat shines a light on the current administration’s abuse of power by suppressing organizations critical of their activities, I believe it meets the 2014 SPJ Code of Ethics provision to “recognize a special obligation to serve as watchdogs over public affairs and government. Seek to ensure that the public’s business is conducted in the open, and that public records are open to all.”

  16. 7th Bonus Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    On November 13, 2019, Rappler posted an article entitled “House OKs on 2nd reading bill institutionalizing Malasakit Centers.”

    It talked about House Bill (HB) No. 5477, a bill that would institutionalize Malasakit Centers in Department of Health-run hospitals, as well as in PGH. It shall make Filipino health care more accessible and affordable, which will particularly be beneficial for the indigent and poor patients in need of quality medical assistance.

    It follows this SPJ code of ethics which is, “recognize a special obligation to serve as watchdogs over public affairs and government. Seek to ensure that the public’s business is conducted in the open, and that public records are open to all.” The article provides facts and details about the passing of the bill that would give annual funds to Malasakit Centers in public hospitals nationwide; and would consequently benefit many Filipinos. It was very transparent with the process of each reading and passage of the bill. It even documented the amendments made by various representatives such as Albay 1st District Representative Edcel Lagman, Deputy Majority Leader Juan Miguel Arroyo, and Deputy Majority Leader Xavier Jesus Romualdo.

    The news item was able to address this SPJ provision: “Be vigilant and courageous about holding those with power accountable. Give voice to the voiceless.” Because the article criticized Bong Go for using Malasakit Centers to promote his candidacy in the May 2019 elections. The article protested against the interference of his political campaign because he was taking all the credit of the opening these Malasakit Centers. It was further reported that these newly opened centers were putting up large posters plastered with the face of Bong Go, to increase his visibility.

    In a sense, it also adheres to the SPJ provision, “Boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear.” It was said in the article that citizens from various locations of these Malasakit centers “complained that government funds were being used to promote Go’s senatorial candidacy.” The article cited how citizens voiced out their dissent towards the politicization of a supposed medical aid that would complement DOH’s Universal Health Care Program. Again, the passing of this bill would greatly help indigenous and poor patients in need of quality medical assistance.

  17. 7th BONUS Media Monitor: Giving Voice to the Voiceless

    On November 14, 2019, Cebu Daily News (under inquirer.net) posted an article with the headline “Marawi: Failure, delay, confusion”. The article talked about how the present administration is managing and rehabilitating the now war-torn ghost town.

    Despite the creation of the Task Force Bangon Marawi (TFBM) and Marawi Reconstruction Conflict Watch (MRCW), Khalid Ansano, a Marawi resident and member of the Marawi development assistance team revealed that the plans for the rehabilitation of Marawi is a “failure, [and have] insufficiency and slow implementation of specific programs, projects, and activities”.

    The recent hearing of the House of Representatives subcommittee on Marawi rehabilitation has also revealed that the supposed P10 billion worth of money (for the sole purpose of Marawi’s rehabilitation) included in the 2018 national budget was yet to be released by the Department of Budget and Management.

    The article incited that government agencies should provide better transparency for its plans for Marawi, including timetables for events, resources available, and outputs to be expected. In addition, the government should also provide a clear accounting of the fund that is supposed to the use for the rehabilitation program. The accounting should also include whatever happened to the pledges of financial assistance the country has received 2 years ago.

    As the article used a source that qualifies as a proper representative/voice of the victims of Marawi, it illustrates that it has used the following SPJ code of ethics provision: “Boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear.”. The article has also urged for the government to take accountability for the results of the failed intelligence work of the military and administration two years ago, hence illustrating the SPJ code of ethics provision:“Be vigilant and courageous about holding those with power accountable. Give voice to the voiceless.”.

  18. 7th BONUS Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    On November 6, 2019, alternative media outlet Pinoy Weekly released an article on their website regarding the latest catastrophe that struck the island of Mindanao.

    The news piece kickstarted by delivering the latest statistics on the casualties after the earthquake. Despite the alarming conditions of the victims, the article revealed that only a small number of affected residents were able to get help, and this is because of the interventions of the government.

    Apparently, Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana, who is the Martial Law administrator in Mindanao, signed ML Instruction No. 2 wherein military forces put up checkpoints to ensure that only “legitimate and authorized relief workers” enter the affected zones. These military protocols, in actuality, made it difficult for groups to deliver aids to the residents as they have to undergo a very rigid process before relief goods were able to reach those who need them. Instead of ensuring safety and security, ML Instruction No. 2 only brought further suffering and hunger to the affected people.

    Furthermore, North Cotabato Police Chief Colonel Maximo threatened to arrest residents who result to beggary in the highways. This is without full consideration that residents opt for such thing because they are getting hungrier by the minute because of the delay the military protocols are causing.

    Given the points discussed in the article, it is clear that the piece adheres to the SPJ Code of Ethics. The article is “vigilant and courageous about holding those with power accountable” and it “recognize(s) a special obligation to serve as watchdogs over public affairs and government” by providing the circumstances in which government officials paved the way in the worsening of the conditions of the victims of the earthquake. IThe article is also able to “boldly tell the story of diversity and magnitude of the human experience” by not just stating statistics but also providing concrete circumstances of the victims due to the lack of action – or inappropriateness of thereto – of the government.

  19. 7th BONUS Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    The editorial column of Philippine Daily Inquirer last November 5, 2019 titled “Scorched-Earth Threat” noted Duterte’s call for SEA nation to protect and not compromise the environment and the region’s biodiversity in exchange of development during the recent ASEAN Summit in Thailand.

    It was followed by a discussion on the controversial China-funded Kaliwa Dam where 10,000 indigenous people and local residents will be displaced, and a portion of Sierra Madre’s resources will be destroyed to give way to a dam that will supposedly provide for the water shortage in Metro Manila. The editorial cited Duterte who said that he would use his extraordinary power to push through the project, and emphasized the questionable permit of Kaliwa Dam without a Free Prior and Informed Consent of the citizens at stake.

    There was a criticism on the contradictory way that Duterte presents himself towards his constituents and the international community.

    Moreover, the article adheres to SPJ’s provision to “be vigilant and courageous about holding those in power accountable. Give voice to the voiceless” by calling out the government’s neglect of the Dumagat and other IP communities in Sierra Madre. For these indigenous groups, losing their land means losing their tradition, their life, their home. However, in the current situation, it seems that they were forgotten as citizens whose rights should be protected by the government.

  20. 7th BONUS Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    The Philippine Star posted an editorial yesterday, 13 November, regarding Vice President Leni Robredo’s challenge as the new co-chairperson of the Inter-Agency Committee Against Drugs.

    The editorial follows the latest significant statistics on the illegal drug situation in the country. It also meticulously recounts the actions taken by the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency from the time of Duterte’s appointment as President in 2016 up to the end of June 2019.

    Drawing its focus on those parcels of information, the editorial’s impact on me became the inability of the Duterte administration to hold up to its core of ending the so-called war on drugs, even utilizing violence and murder. The extreme medium of violence was not able to eliminate the issue at hand, where suppliers and distributors still need to be hunted down and a reconfigured approach must be made. What I can takeaway from the editorial was ultimately the transfer of burden from Duterte to Robredo, a promise the former by himself made and was not able to live up to, veiled as a “challenge.”

    The report is able to follow the SPJ code of ethics provision, “recognize a special obligation to serve as watchdogs over public affairs and government. Seek to ensure that the public’s business is conducted in the open, and that public records are open to all.” The editorial featured a great deal of statistics, information, and actions taken by the government which are not widely broadcasted to the public but are essential in shaping the people’s idea of the current administration hence becoming informed of the latest happenings and developments on certain issues at hand.

  21. 7th BONUS Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    On June 28, 2019, Bulatlat.com’s Janess Ellao, wrote an online article entitled, “Why Pepmaco workers are on strike”. Images of bloodstained Peerless Producers Manufacturing Corp. (PEPMACO) workers showed how they were attacked by armed people.

    The article further explained how these workers were underpaid, receiving around P373 a day, while working for at least 12 hours each day. It is also reported that they do not have proper equipment and gear to handle chemical substances. The exposure to these chemicals led to health complications. Furthermore, the workers are not provided with health insurance. They are also under contractualization. Anakpawis Rep. Ariel Casilao stated that the “pending ‘secure of tenure’ bill allows job-contracting by big firms and will fail to regularize workers…Thus, contractual workers will be at their mercy, enduring low wages and without benefits”. Casilao criticized the Duterte administration’s failure for not putting an end to contractualization.

    The exploitation of PEPMACO employees, gave rise to strikes and the PEPMACO Workers Union. They have put up their union’s Facebook page, “Pepmaco Workers Union-NAFLU-KMU” where testimonies and statements from their workers are uploaded. These are available to the public.

    With images as proof and the establishment of their own FB page, the article showed the reality in which workers are abused as they fight for their rights. I think that this article is an example of SPJ’s Code of Ethics provision, “Be vigilant and courageous about holding those with power accountable. Give voice to the voiceless.” PEPMACO tried to shut down their calls by laying off most of their workers. The gravity of their situation is dire and it is the media outlet’s goal to put forward their plight so that the general public could see and listen to their stories.

  22. 7th Bonus Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    On September 6, Altermidya.net published a feature article entitled “NutriAsia 17 and the search for justice”. The article talks about the workers of NutriAsia and their experiences during the strike and after their arrest. This illustrates the SPJ Code of Ethics provision that “Boldly tells the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear”. We usually know about the company and their products but we rarely hear the stories of the factory workers behind the creation of these products. This article shines a light on their struggles as NutriAsia workers and as human as well.

    The feature article gives a chance to those arrested workers during the strike to tell how they were treated like animals and what different types of inhumane actions they had to undergo in fighting for their rights. It was also mentioned in the article how slow and long the judicial process has been to poor people like them. It has been over 2 months since their arrest and justice is still nowhere to be found. In the meantime, the best they could do is to be positive with the help of their families cheering them up and being there for them throughout their struggles in obtaining justice.

    This article is a representation of the cry for help of the NutriAsia 17 given the fact that the justice system for our poor citizens is unfair. Through this, they are given an opportunity to fight for equal rights as we are all human no matter what status in life we are in. This is their voice that hopefully a lot of us would now listen to especially our government.

  23. 7th BONUS Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    Last July 8, 2019, the Philippine Daily Inquirer released an article titled, “P607-B Clark ‘green city’ to displace Aeta communities”. They challenged the idea of Clark being established and reconstructed into a climate change resilient city, because of how it will affect the lives of the Aeta community, which is a notable indigenous group. Despite the project seemingly having good intentions which include decongesting Metro Manila, developers disregarded the impact the project would have on the Aetas. Many of their lands were disturbed, all for the sake of progress and flattening the roads. The issue was described to be a case of development aggression.

    The article did adhere with the provision that “-Recognize a special obligation to serve as watchdogs over public affairs and government. Seek to ensure that the public’s business is conducted in the open, and that public records are open to all.” because it vividly describes how the plans for the New Clark City is costly – it would cost 607 billion pesos to establish a climate change resilient city. At the expense of this, the Aeta communities are displaced. They can no longer use their lands to harvest crops and food for themselves. Their homes have been taken away from them.

    In addition, the authors gave a humanized take because of its feature on Aeta individuals. The story of Melba, an Aeta Mahawang in Kalangitan, was mentioned to emphasize how the Meta’s lands have been home for generations. Lastly, the article held the businesses and government officials directly involved, in order to truly deliver the message that the project is business-centric. These groups claimed to have collaborated with the affected Aeta communities, but the article disproves it by mentioning the casualties.

    To summarize all my points, the news article definitely revealed the capitalist intentions of business, while masking it under a project that supposedly aims to give greener pastures.

  24. 7th Bonus Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    On September 6, Altermidya published a feature article entitled “NutriAsia 17 and the search for justice”. The article talks about the workers of NutriAsia and their experiences during the strike and after their arrest. This illustrates the SPJ Code of Ethics provision that “Boldly tells the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear”. We usually know about the company and their products but we rarely hear the stories of the factory workers behind the creation of these products. This article shines a light on their struggles as NutriAsia workers and as human as well.

    The feature article gives a chance to those arrested workers during the strike to tell how they were treated like animals and what different types of inhumane actions they had to undergo in fighting for their rights. It was also mentioned in the article how slow and long the judicial process has been to poor people like them. It has been over 2 months since their arrest and justice is still nowhere to be found. In the meantime, the best they could do is to be positive with the help of their families cheering them up and being there for them throughout their struggles in obtaining justice.

    This article is a representation of the cry for help of the NutriAsia 17 given the fact that the justice system for our poor citizens is unfair. Through this, they are given an opportunity to fight for equal rights as we are all human no matter what status in life we are in. This is their voice that hopefully a lot of us would now listen to especially our government.

  25. 7th BONUS Media Monitor: Giving Voice to the Voiceless

    A Facebook news page published today, November 14, a coverage of a mobilization of the group Bantay Bigas. The mobilization was held yesterday in front of the House of Representatives. They have acquired 50,000 signatures against the Rice Liberalization Law. Most alternative media news outfits have covered this mobilization and this issue.

    They give voice to the voiceless by highlighting the issues of the farmers and those peasant groups involved. The post garnered 35 reactions and 10 shares. The comments on the post are agreeing with the note to junk the Rice LIberalization Law.

    The same Facebook news page has given voice to other oppressed groups like the lumads and the news outfit was on site covering the PEPMACO workers’ struggles. They do not falter based on the issue. They diligently follow the 2014 SPJ Code of Ethics which is giving a voice to the voiceless.

  26. 7th Bonus Media Monitor: “Giving Voice to the Voiceless”

    On November 14, 2019, BBC News posted an online article entitled “Duterte’s health: ‘Work from home’ raises questions in the Philippines,” following the announcement of the Office of the President that President Duterte will take a three-day rest and will work from home instead.

    Following the announcement, Filipinos have expressed concern over the health of the president which, according to the constitution, must be disclosed to the public as a public concern.

    This article by the BBC featuring the concerns of the public follows the provision of the SPJ stating that “Recognize a special obligation to serve as watchdogs over public affairs and government. Seek to ensure that the public’s business is conducted in the open, and that public records are open to all.” Given that the health of the President is a public concern, the article highlights the need to ensure that important issues or concerns must be disclosed to the public.

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